Posted by Kendall Harmon

Just as Christians can never retire from serving the Lord Jesus Christ, so also we can never retire from serving other people. The work of prayerfully proclaiming Christ, his cross and resurrection is a way of life more than an occupation.

One form of this service is that of a pastor: that is a shepherd or under-shepherd of the Great Shepherd. Being a pastor involves caring for and leading a flock. We misuse the word ‘pastor’ when we confine it to ‘counselling’, especially counselling an individual. Pastoral work is different to the work of the modern counsellor and a pastor does more than care for an individual sheep; he leads a flock.

A shepherd whose flock consists of one sheep is not a very profitable shepherd. He is a hobby farmer with a pet, and the emphasis is on hobby rather than farmer and pet rather than sheep. A pastor may leave the ninety-nine to search for the one lost sheep, but his aim is to bring it back to the flock, not spend all his time caring for the one that was lost. The nature of the gospel is to bring people into fellowship with each other and the pastor is to draw them together. While the good shepherd of Ezekiel 34 and John 10 will lay down his life for the sheep, the work of the pastor in these passages is more specific than simply self-sacrifice. It involves gathering the scattered sheep into a flock, leading them to rich pasture and judging between them so that the fat sheep do not trample the lean.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted July 5, 2014 at 2:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Church has decided to give priests in Australia the option of breaking the confidentiality of confessions.

The general synod, meeting in Adelaide, has voted for the historic change to cover serious crimes, such as child abuse.

It has decided it will be up to individual dioceses to adopt the policy.

Adelaide's Anglican Archbishop Jeffrey Driver says the change makes sense but there will not be a hard-and-fast rule.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

4 Comments
Posted July 3, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Melbourne archbishop Philip Freier was today chosen to lead the Anglican Church in Australia, elected by a special synod of laymen, clergy and bishops from across the country, convened in Adelaide.

He said sustaining a national presence and strengthening the church’s contribution to rural communities were among the most important challenges facing the Anglican Church.

“The church across its parishes, schools and service agencies makes a powerful contribution to Australian society,” Dr Freier said.

He takes over from Brisbane archbishop Phillip Aspinall, who is stepping down after nine years.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted June 30, 2014 at 11:08 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Archbishop Peter Jensen and Archbishop Benjamin and Gloria Kwashi are visiting the Diocese. Both Archbishops preached in Diocesan churches on Sunday, June 29.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaChurch of Nigeria* AdminFeatured (Sticky)* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the OrdainedPreaching / Homiletics* South Carolina* Theology

0 Comments
Posted June 30, 2014 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon


(Craige Borrett photo)

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaChurch of Nigeria* General InterestPhotos/Photography* South Carolina

10 Comments
Posted June 29, 2014 at 5:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

NSW public schools should spend government funding on tackling obesity and promoting wellness and positive psychology rather than the untested chaplaincy program that are in hundreds of the state's schools, the head of Sydney's Anglican Education Commission has argued.

As the Federal Government considers the fate of its National School Chaplaincy Program after the High Court ruled the commonwealth could not fund it, the executive director of the commission, Bryan Cowling, said there was no evidence the chaplaincy program was effective.

Dr Cowling, a former head of curriculum in the NSW Department of Education, said a long-term goal of public schools should be to replace scripture classes with a mandatory "world view and ethics" class providing students with a "broad exposure" to many religions.

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchEducationReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted June 25, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dr [Glenn] Davies attended Evensong with the ACNA bishops in Pennsylvania, where the decision was announced.

"Bishop Foley will be a strong conservative voice within this newly formed province, among the GAFCON Primates and throughout the Anglican Communion. He is a man who has stood firm for the gospel in difficult circumstances, and has not been afraid to contend for the faith once delivered to the saints." Dr Davies said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Anglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted June 23, 2014 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dr Anderson has been the Head of the Department of Mission at Moore Theological College, Sydney since 2007.

He has had a long standing interest in the Aboriginal church and in ministry in the Territory.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted June 23, 2014 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The divine love is a costly love. It could not stand idly by while human creatures destroyed themselves. It had to get involved. As the French philosopher Alain Badiou says of love: "Love without risk is an impossibility, like war without death." This makes sense of the passage that brides love so much: Paul's hymn to love in 1 Corithians 13. It is not an ode to an abstract principle. It is a description of love as the divine being expresses it within the broken world of our experience - and thus it has to be patient, and kind, and keep no record of wrongs, since this is a world in which there wrongs, and irritations, and cruelties. It demands not disinterested objectivity, but deep involvement in the world. It cannot help but draw you in.

The pattern of the divine love then teaches us that the way to the good is neither through pure self-expression, nor through a complete and rational disinterest. Love demands costly action for the sake of the other, but its demands cannot be calculated by some formula. Love may involve not pleasure but suffering - not a suffering imposed on others in conformity to some principle, but a suffering for the sake of others. To act out of love can never be to act out of complete selflessness, because the acts that love forms result in joy for those who do them. But this joy does not corrupt the act and make it less good in some way.

Could we then ask, not what brings the greatest happiness to the greatest number, nor what universal law does my action fulfil, nor what freedom to express my inner self does it allow, but rather what is an expression of the ethics of love? Could that form the basis for an extraordinary social, moral and political vision?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchPsychology* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyThe Trinity: Father, Son and Holy SpiritTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted May 27, 2014 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The current-day church sits on the same patch of land as the original cathedral when it was built in 1848.

"Unfortunately in this area, there's a river bed right down low and the old cathedral didn't have good enough foundations," says the co-ordinator of the cathedral's guides, Lalage Gabb.

"In 1895 they decided to put heating in and they put in a furnace below ground, which dried-out the clay and caused the old cathedral to crack.

"In 1911, the Bishop wanted to replace the cathedral. If the present occupational health and safety laws had been in, the cathedral would've been closed because it was dropping bits off it," she says.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryLiturgy, Music, WorshipParish Ministry* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted May 15, 2014 at 5:26 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Paul Barnett, a leading historian of early Christianity, investigates the period sometimes labelled the “unknown years” of Paul’s ministry (i.e. the 14 years between his Damascus Road experience and first missionary journey), in order to provide a foundation for interpreting Galatians. He convincingly accounts for Paul’s activities during that span, and offers a compelling interpretation of sections of Galatians based on his reconstruction.

Barnett refutes the assumption that Paul spent those years in Antioch and was formed by his experiences there. Where many assert that Paul’s view of the Christ was shaped by his interaction with pagans in Antioch (and so distorts a simpler, early Jewish faith), Barnett argues that Paul worked for eight of the 14 years in Tarsus, with hardly more than 12 months in Antioch. And during his extended time in Tarsus and Cilicia, preceding both Antioch and the first missionary journey, Paul was already preaching to Gentiles.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchBooks* TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted May 12, 2014 at 6:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Anglican leaders are hailing the report Nudging Anglican Parishes to Prevent Violence Against Women, saying it points to a paradigm shift in the way Anglican communities assist in tackling family violence now and in the future.

In Australia, one in three women has experienced violence and one woman dies each week as a result of violence in the home. Most of their tormentors are not strangers lurking on busy streets, but their friends, acquaintances, husbands, brothers and fathers. The rest of the data on violence against women is equally disturbing.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyMenSexualityViolenceWomen* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted May 2, 2014 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchUrban/City Life and Issues* Economics, PoliticsEconomyHousing/Real Estate Market

0 Comments
Posted April 30, 2014 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

One of Tasmania's leading religious leaders has used his Easter message to criticise one of the new Government's key reforms.

The Anglican Bishop John Harrower has urged the government not to scrap suspended sentences, saying there is too much focus on locking up criminals rather than rehabilitating them.

Reverend Harrower today urged the congregation at St. David's Cathedral to show compassion and love towards all.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEaster* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesPrison/Prison Ministry* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted April 22, 2014 at 3:50 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Listen to it all from Saint Helena's, Beaufort (it begins with the Gospel reading followed by some music, the sermon itself starts at about 3:05)

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEasterParish MinistryMinistry of the OrdainedPreaching / Homiletics* TheologyChristologyEschatologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted April 22, 2014 at 4:41 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

...the resurrection of Jesus, which we celebrate this Easter weekend, was unique.

The words he spoke alongside Lazarus’ tomb touch us all.

Jesus said ‘I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.’

These words have been said at funerals since the time of the New Testament.

They speak of hope and resurrection life, which is available to all who put their trust in Jesus – risen from the dead.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEaster

0 Comments
Posted April 20, 2014 at 6:04 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

An evangelist and former actor, who is currently the rector of an central London church, has been elected as the new Bishop of Riverina.

63 year old the Rev Alan Robert (Rob) Gillion, is Rector of Holy Trinity, Sloane Square, and St Saviour, Upper Chelsea, in the Diocese of London.

He is a member of the Archbishops’ (of Canterbury and York) College of Evangelists and a contributor and advisor to the BBC for religious broadcasts, taking part in radio programmes such as 'Pause for Thought' .

The new bishop-elect trained as an actor at the University of London and worked an actor and theatre director for 12 years before entering the ministry.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted April 9, 2014 at 6:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In His teaching Jesus continually made claims for Himself both explicitly and by implication, and claims that we should regard as fantastic did any other make them. He said He could forgive men’s sins, and indeed, on one occasion worked a miracle to prove His point (Mark 2: 10ff.). He said that He would raise men up at the last day (John 6:40). He said that He would be the Judge of men at that day (John 5: 25ff.), and that men’s attitude to Him and His words now would be the criterion by which they will then be judged (Mark 8:38). He spoke of Himself as the bread of life (John 6: 35), as “the light of the world” (John 8: 12). He said that He was “the way, the truth, and the life” and He added, “no man cometh unto the Father, but by me” (John 14: 6).

He issued the gracious invitation, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls” (Matt. 11:28f.). We have come to take these beautiful words very much for granted. But when we reflect on them they involve an extraordinary claim. We cannot imagine anybody else making them, not Confucius nor Mahommet, not Julius Caesar nor Francis of Assisi nor the Archbishop of Canterbury. In fact not any of the sons of men. But the words sound natural enough as an utterance of Jesus. Furthermore, through the centuries all sorts of weary and heavy laden people have been coming to Him and finding, as He said they would, rest unto (their) souls.”

The making of such claims demands that one of three things be true, namely Jesus was an impostor, or He was deluded, or He was divine. There seems no other possibility.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* TheologyChristologyTheology: Scripture

1 Comments
Posted March 21, 2014 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Dr Macneil's Public Teaching
During a series of lenten sermons in 2013, whilst preaching on the parable of the Prodigal (Luke 15), Dr Macneil stated the following:
Although we tend to hear [the parable of the Prodigal] as a parable highlighting God's welcome to all sinners, expecially those who have lurid pasts, like the younger son, its placement in the Gospel of Luke aims it straight at the religious authorities - the goody two shoes upholders of the faith. Will they join the party? Or will they stick to their rigid adherence to the Torah, tithing even the herbs in their cupboards, but neglecting mercy and compassion?

We can ask where it is that we are working within rules that neglect mercy and compassion.

Is it the Anglican Church of Australia's reluctance to allow the ordination of gay people in same sex relationships?

While this is a rhetorical question, the intended meaning is transparent. Macneil is advocating for the ordination of people in same sex relationships as something that is good and godly "mercy and compassion".

In a sermon at St Luke's Enmore, Sydney, in October 2010, Dr Macneil gave a clear description of Penal Substitution and then labels it as 'mechanistic and grim'.
It is clear from the gospel [Luke 10:1-9] and from Acts that Luke is not thinking of salvation and atonement in terms of what we now call penal substitution. This view uses the logic of retributive justice and argues that it was Jesus' death on the cross that saved us from our sins and brought us into right relationship with God. A debt had to be paid for human sin and disobedience in order to satisfy God's demands of justice. This is what made Christ's death upon the cross necessary. In his great love for us, Christ is therefore said to had taken the punishment deserved by all humanity upon himself.

This rather mechanistic and grim understanding of atonement, prevalent not so very far from here, was not part of early Christian thought and clearly not part of Luke's thought world. Nor does Luke regard Jesus's death as a sacrifice or as an expiation for sin. His focus is more on Jesus' life and on the wholeness that is brought to humanity through contact with the suffering Messiah.

There is no doubt in the gospel that Jesus is the Messiah, no doubt that he will suffer and die, but the wholeness that comes to people because of him, comes from their encounter with him.

Jesus' presence is what brings life, peace, forgiveness of sins and right relationship to God

This same redefining of the atoning death of Jesus, is expressed in her Sermon for Christmas 2012:
Of course, some would argue that this is irrelevant - that Jesus' sole purpose was to provide our passport to salvation, a mission he fulfilled very effectively, if somewhat mysteriously, by dying. He was, in short, a man born to die. If we believe that he is God, then everything will be OK. In this way of seeing things, the focus really belongs on his death and resurrection. The events of the 33 years or so between birth and death were pretty irrelevant really and just show us that he really was the long expected chosen one of God.

But I want to argue a very different kind of line. For I believe that the birth of Jesus as a human child, as one of us, has a much richer significance than that and is indeed infinitely more challenging. The incarnation is not some sort of crazy rescue plan; it is a systematic and timeless revelation to humanity about what it is to be human and about our relationship with God. Jesus' life is not so much to show us who he is but rather to show us who we are, and who we are in relationship with God.

What Dr Macneil responds to here is a false dichotomy (that those who teach the atoning death of Jesus insist that his life is irrelevant), the same movement away from Jesus' atoning death to an exemplar life, as she attempted to do at St Luke's in 2010, is clear.

How Dr Macneil's teaching conflicts with Anglican formularies and the Scriptures...

Read it all from here


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

2 Comments
Posted February 28, 2014 at 7:49 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There will be some notable absentees when history is made in Grafton tomorrow.

The Right Reverend Sarah Macneil will attend a ceremony in the Grafton Cathedral to be consecrated as Australia's first female leader of an Anglican diocese.

But she says some senior figures in the church will not be attending...

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted February 28, 2014 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The new Archbishop of Sydney, Dr Glenn Davies, has raised the issue of image and the 'selfie' phenomenon in his first Christmas message as Archbishop....

Oxford Dictionaries declared 'selfie' word of the year, saying its use had increased by 17,000 percent in the last 12 months.

The Archbishop compared the social trend with the fact that Christmas celebrates the Son of God coming to earth.

"At Christmas time we should remember that there is an ultimate self-image, the image of God, which far outweighs the supercilious picture of a face filling our screen" he said. "We are all stamped with the image of God and it is this image that makes us precious in his sight."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsChristmas

0 Comments
Posted December 26, 2013 at 4:29 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Andreas Leowe, the Dean of Anglican cathedral, will deliver the morning sermon and he spoke to the Star Observer about why they felt it was an important event to host.

“Anglicans live with HIV. That’s the most basic reason, and Anglicans also do a lot of work with overseas HIV communities,” said Leowe, describing work the church does in the Solomon Islands and Kenya.

“There’s a fortunate combination this year in that World AIDS Day falls on a Sunday, which helps us put on a much larger celebration than we usually do,” he added.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchGlobalizationHealth & Medicine

0 Comments
Posted December 1, 2013 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

EMILY BOURKE: The Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia, Phillip Aspinall, is the most senior religious leader to come before the Royal Commission.

PHILLIP ASPINALL: If I might use a commercial analogy: if people think that the Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia is the CEO of Australia's Anglicans, then nothing could be further from the truth. The Primate has very, very limited powers.

EMILY BOURKE: Nevertheless, under questioning Dr Aspinall provided some insights into the Anglican Church.

PHILLIP ASPINALL: The politics are very difficult and it's very difficult to get any kind of uniform approach to any matter.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

1 Comments
Posted November 27, 2013 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

After 50 years in the church, an Anglican priest says he doesn't know if he can say he's a Christian.

The priest, who was central to handling a group claim from people who suffered abuse in a NSW Anglican children's home, has announced he is quitting the clergy.

In a surprise revelation at Monday's hearing into how the Anglican Church dealt with victims of abuse at a children's home in Lismore, the former registrar of the Grafton Diocese, Pat Comben, said he had relinquished holy orders.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted November 26, 2013 at 5:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Read it all

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

1 Comments
Posted November 18, 2013 at 10:36 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican church's first female bishop has described the announcement of her historical appointment as "messy" after it was brought forth at the same time a royal commission focused on her new diocese.

The Reverend Dr Sarah Macneil, 58, was elected unanimously as the 11th bishop of the Anglican diocese of Grafton.

Her appointment was announced at church services on Sunday, a day before the Anglican church and Grafton diocese appeared before the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted November 18, 2013 at 3:18 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A church minister has been left with a broken jaw after going to the aid of a pizza delivery driver who was robbed in Sydney.

Up to six men attacked the 17-year-old driver while he was making a delivery at Naremburn on Sydney's north shore on Saturday night, police say.

Some of the teenage attackers managed to flee with the pizzas and started walking south on Willoughby Road.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchViolence

0 Comments
Posted November 13, 2013 at 5:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Archbishop of Sydney, Dr Glenn Davies, has announced that a church planter, with experience in Australia and overseas, is to be the next Bishop of North Sydney.

The Rev Chris Edwards was the founding minister of Holy Trinity Adelaide Hills, in South Australia, which grew more than tenfold under his leadership. He later led St Paul’s Anglican Church, Tervuren, Belgium and was chairman of its school.

He is 52 years old.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted November 13, 2013 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

AS the Anglican Church gets ready for its next round of royal commission public hearings, the Bishop of the Diocese of Newcastle has sent out a letter warning of the potential for news that “this diocese could have done better”.

Diocese of Newcastle administrator Bishop Peter Stuart’s pastoral letter will be read out in parishes diocese-wide.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenSexualityViolence* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted November 10, 2013 at 5:16 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rev Baden Stace, rector of St Cuthbert’s Carlton and chair of the Jesus brings steering committee says the aim is really to support the local parishes to push particularly hard in 2014 with mission.

“We’re trying to energise the parishes,” he says. “Connect 09 was a great time for many churches across the Diocese, and they sounded energised to be part of something bigger, and to be part of something together... we’re wanting to equip them and give a mission focus such that 80,000 Christians in Anglican churches across Sydney and the Illawarra can collectively shout out to our region what Jesus brings, and get to the heart of the gospel.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryEvangelism and Church Growth* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted November 5, 2013 at 4:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Archbishop of Perth has rejected for the second time a motion by his church synod to formally recognise same-sex relationships.

Earlier this month, the synod voted two-thirds majority in favour of legal acknowledgement of the civil unions of gay people.

...Archbishop Herft says he cannot assent to the motion.

"What we have in the Diocese of course is a number of people in same-sex relationships amongst the clergy and amongst the laity and we have always said that people of all forms of sexuality and orientation are welcome," he said.

"I think that's what the synod was trying to do was to express hospitality but what this particular resolution does is asks me, in the first instance, to recognise diversity within the diocese of Perth, both in our sexual identities and in our theologies of human sexuality, that's the first part and I mean that's a fact; there is a diversity within the diocese of Perth, both in our sexual identities and in our theologies....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted October 29, 2013 at 3:23 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This post is sticky - look below GAFCON Links entry for new posts
The video of Abp. Peter Jensen's address to the Primates luncheon and the Abp. of Canterbury in Nairobi on Sunday Oct. 20.

Watch it all.

Update: There is also a Transcript of this talk available on the GAFCON site [pdf] and on the AAC site here and on Anglican Ink copied below

TRANSCRIPT: DR PETER JENSEN, General Secretary of the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans

Your graces, my lords, ladies and gentlemen, actually brothers and sisters, it is a very wonderful thing to stand here and look around and see so many whose faces I know so well who I count as comrades, brothers and sisters in the long, arduous business of being Christian. As well as that, I see quite a number whose acquaintance I have just made.

My first duty today is to say particularly to the local committee who have arranged for GAFCON to take place here, how very, very grateful we are to you for the extraordinary amount of work you have done, for the skill with which you have done it, and for the endless hours of time you have put into this. I might say with the High Commissioner how much this has enhanced if I can say so and will enhance the reputation of Kenya and Nairobi.

You have been through two horrendous incidents with the fire at the airport and of course this last tragedy. You have continued on, faithfully and steadfastly. You have looked again at the security for example, I know that, but you have been so faithful in doing all this. We will not be adequately able to thank you but please accept these words as our deepest thanks to you for making this great convention possible.

Can I also say that I didn’t think it would be possible until I walked into the Trinity Centre and then I knew, since we could never build that centre in Sydney, I knew I was in the presence of people who can run a convention and do it well. So I want to lead the rest of us in applause to the local committee. (Applause).

Your Grace the Primate of Kenya we want to thank you. It is not an easy thing to extend an invitation to hundreds and hundreds of people to come. My whole aim in Sydney I have to say was to avoid the General Synod occurring ever in Sydney, always have it somewhere else. I know what it’s like, and that was nothing compared to having GAFCON here. So again and very publicly I want to say how very grateful we are to you. And today of course I want to thank you, on behalf of all your guests, for this magnificent meal that you and Mama Rhoda have been hosting for us and I want to say how grateful we are; but also I want to assure you publicly that you are loved, you are deeply loved, both here in Kenya but also around the world, and we love and honour you for all you have done for us – thank you. (Applause)

I have also been asked to say just a few words about GAFCON. One of the reasons why it is so appropriate to be here for GAFCON this week is that it was born in Nairobi, Room 1216 of the Hilton Hotel to be exact, well I have to check my records, but I think it was 1216. A number of people sitting here today were present at that meeting. And it was intentionally held here in Kenya. The leader of the meeting of course was Archbishop Akinola, and I can remember Archbishop Okoh at his right. And Archbishop Okoh’s great contribution to the meeting, amongst others, was to tell us that the word GAFCON was the word we should have. So I think it was you sir, I can’t see you, but it was you sir who gave us the word GAFCON and for that we are very grateful because it is the Global Anglican Future Conference which we decided on.

Now a number of the folk here today were present at that. How little we could have guessed that we would be here five years later and asking ourselves what has been accomplished. I heard earlier today - Archbishop Wabukala said - that in a sense the crisis has passed, and that’s true because you can’t live in a state of crisis. The crisis having been passed, the results have become permanent, or at least permanent for the time being if I can put it like that. Something has happened with grave consequences which now go on. And what indeed has happened and why?

Well, the genesis of GAFCON as you know was the authority of Scripture: Is the word of God the word of God?

Long ago, even before GAFCON, Bishop Nazir-Ali said to me that the debate we were having was about the clarity of Scripture. I’ll never forget him saying that. And I thought yes, he’s right of course: Is the Bible the Bible for everybody, that all can read, in a way in which it interprets itself? Is it the Bible for the lay people as much as it is the Bible for the clergy and anyone else? And this was Bishop Nazir-Ali’s point: that we can read the Bible too; and we can understand what it is saying to us. And the clarity of the Scriptures - particularly in the area of human sexuality - which is so important for our identity, means that we believe that we know – always ready to look again - but when we look again, the same message appears:: that human sexual expression needs to occur within the bonds of marriage between a man and a woman, and anything else is unholy matrimony, if you like.

Now it’s those great issues, aren’t they: the Bible and our obedience to the Bible, which gave us the explosion if you like which occurred at GAFCON. Since then, I see GAFCON – it’s interesting, you occasionally hear what people say about GAFCON and the FCA, not always very nice – it is often far from accurate.

I often hear it said that it is a ‘schismatic movement’, which is very funny considering how many Anglicans are involved in it - ‘it’s a schismatic movement’. And I’ve heard a view that ‘it is homophobic’ of course, and all the other terms of abuse that’s it’s so popular to throw.

I want to say to you that the GAFCON movement is a movement for Unity. I remember the Saturday night after GAFCON I, we had gathered in the room, the Primates gathered there, I gathered as the boy in the room, and the discussion was held. And I think it was I, but someone asked the question: ‘Are we leaving the Anglican Communion?’ And immediately all said: ‘No we are not leaving the Anglican Communion; that is not the intention, we would never do that.’ But our intention is to gather up the fragments of the Anglican Communion. And what GAFCON has done, particularly in North America, has been to gather up the fragments and to unite and to make sure that our beloved friends like Archbishop Bob Duncan here today, our beloved friends are kept and recognised as the authentic true Anglicans that they are, and that they don’t have to pretend to be something else. (Acclaim and applause)

And of course it is not only the North Americans but others as well, and this is going to happen in other places around the Communion, indeed it has begun to happen in other places around the Communion, where to stand for Biblical truth is going to cost you very, very dearly indeed, as it has cost our brothers here. And then you will have to ask yourself: who are our friends? Who will stand with us? And GAFCON is a way of delivering friendship, it is a way of delivering unity, it is a way of making sure that to quote the immortal words of a Nigerian bishop at our last meeting in London: ‘Now we know we are not alone’ [Approval]. I’ve never forgotten him saying that.

That’s GAFCON: Now we know that we are not alone.

Now, as we heard this morning, the Anglican Communion 21st Century is going to look very, very different from the Anglican Communion that began the 21st Century – that’s obvious. Indeed it is not only going to look different, it is different, it already is different. The events of 2008, little did we know it, was the birth of something new in the Anglican Communion. And in a sense GAFCON is called I believe to model what a Communion could be, a different Communion. I like to put it this way: that the British Empire is dead but the British Commonwealth of nations has followed.

There’s a different partnership, a different equality between the partners now, a bringing together of bishops, laity and clergy, altogether in a great conference where all may play their part, and a way of modelling and being the Anglican Communion for the sake of the whole Gospel, of Christ and the Gospel, in a way which will bring our gifts to bear for the sake of one another. That’s a great picture, and I believe in microcosm this is what the FCA movement is already and has begun to be.

Here is, when thirteen hundred and - now last night it was thirteen hundred and fifty-two, this morning it is thirteen hundred and forty-eight and one baby from Nigeria I believe – are gathering in Nairobi.

1,352 Anglican Christians are gathering here in Nairobi for a week in which we are going to seek, according to Archbishop Wabukala, we are going to seek the Glory of God.

Our prayer is that we may see the Glory of God in this week together and go home changed. We are going to hear about the East African Revival. We are going to be challenged by it. We from the West are going to be deeply challenged about the East African Revival. We are going to hear about the Persecuted Church. We are going to hear from each other. We are going to minister to each other. We are going to hear the Word of God together and sit underneath the teaching of the Word of God. It is I believe that we are going to sing the praises of God and worship together.

It is I believe going to be an extraordinary week, not just a sort of missions conference, something I know +Bob Duncan was worried about, but it is an ecclesial conference - it is more than that. [Oh you mean I’ve learned something from you?] Archbishop Duncan is always hoping I am going to learn something from him, and I have. (laughter). It is more than just a conference, it is more than that.

Now we are deeply in prayer, Archbishop Wabukala told us to be in prayer we will see the Glory of God. For my part I have asked that we will see that the Lord will maintain the unity of the Spirit and the bond of peace, because Unity is what we are about.

Now that’s the genesis of FCA, GAFCON, and I have talked about it’s meaning.

And just to conclude by saying it has two great Purposes:

- First of all to recognise and authenticate Anglicans, who for no fault of their own, in a stand for Biblical truth have become disaffiliated from their own denomination or original church – to gather up the fragments of Christ’s church, and to maintain them in unity.

- And then Secondly, to bring together Anglicans from all around the world - [we’re not the only Anglicans, of course, that would be nonsense] – but to bring together Anglicans from all around the world, to release the energy of the Anglican Communion for the sake of: the Mission of the Gospel; the Sovereignty of God’s Word; the Glory of God’s Name; and the Good of God’s People.

Dear brothers and sisters as we are here today enjoying this wonderful occasion together, let’s remember what’s drawn us together, the Glory of God, and let us join in prayer that we will indeed see the Glory of God this week in Nairobi. (Applause)

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaAnglican Church of KenyaGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* AdminFeatured (Sticky)

2 Comments
Posted October 23, 2013 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

After morning tea we turned to the opening plenary session and the chairman’s address. Archbishop Wabakula of Kenya is a softly-spoken man but even his gentle voice could not disguise the power of what he had to say. We reported yesterday that Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, had been challenged by the Primates in their meeting and Wabukala had equally firm words to say. Here’s the key paragraph,
Five years on, the paralysis of which we spoke has intensified. And it has become clear that the Communion now needs new wineskins, a new way of ordering its affairs to fulfil the world wide scope of the Great Commission. Even the Archbishop of Canterbury has now come to this conclusion and I am grateful for

His Grace’s honesty in acknowledging that the Anglican Communion’s neo- colonial leadership structures need to be replaced when he preached here at All Saints Cathedral last Sunday. However, it is difficult to see how stable and effective leadership can be developed unless the depth of the spiritual crisis we face is acknowledged. Organisational change on its own will not be enough. Even the very weak theological discipline of the Anglican Covenant has failed to win consent despite years of negotiation and the Archbishop of Canterbury is no longer able to gather the Communion.
Or, put in simpler terms, it’s not enough for Welby to visit GAFCON and tell them that he recognises that the current structures are failing. If he will not deal with the real issues (the apostasy of the American and Canadian churches) then GAFCON will continue on without him. He no longer commands any leadership amongst them.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury --Justin WelbyAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaAnglican Church of KenyaGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet

0 Comments
Posted October 23, 2013 at 5:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Reality struck home today.

There are forces within the Anglican Church that are making it hard for some of our brothers and sisters to remain Anglican. There are forces outside the Anglican Church that are making it hard for some of our brothers and sisters to remain Christian.

Just recently I gave a talk in which I quoted Paul in 2 Timothy 3: In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evildoers and impostors will go from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived. I almost want to go back to that group of people and apologise for trying to unpack what Paul meant without any real understanding.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet

0 Comments
Posted October 22, 2013 at 4:28 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Makes the heart glad--KSH (Photo courtesy of David Ould).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* South Carolina

4 Comments
Posted October 21, 2013 at 3:19 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Marriage equality advocates have spoken out after Sydney Anglican Archbishop Glenn Davies labelled the prospect of same-sex couples marrying as “unholy matrimony”.

Archbishop Davies (pictured) also referred to “so-called gay marriage” as contrary to God’s law during his first presidential address to the Sydney synod, while warning of consequences for the entire country if Australia “slipped further and further away from the tenets of scriptural authority and biblical morality”. Davies, 62, was elected as Sydney’s new Anglican Archbishop in August.

“Specious arguments for ‘marriage equality’ and ‘equal opportunity’ have become the mantra of many, without any serious engagement with the nature of marriage,” the Archbishop said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

2 Comments
Posted October 18, 2013 at 5:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Archbishops says he will now carefully consider his position....if you take the first part of the resolution - it says the diocese 'recognises diversity within the diocese of Perth, both in our sexual identities and our theologies of human sexuality'.

"What I said last time is that I thought that this was theologically flawed. I am speaking to you as a human person made in the image of God. I don't see you or engage with you on the basis of your sexual identity.

"The other big issue for me, with the royal commission [into child abuse] clearly attentive to how we use language and words, what this resolution says is that I must formally accept people with an open ended recognition of diverse theologies on sexual identity.

"I think we have to be very careful there...."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted October 9, 2013 at 6:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Commonwealth Bank has frozen several of the Bathurst Anglican diocese’s accounts as it moves to recover as much of the $36 million debt owed as possible.

The sale of the Orange Anglican Grammar School and the Macquarie Anglican Grammar School in Dubbo, finalised last Monday, “crystallised” the amount of debt hanging over the head of the troubled diocese, according to Bishop Ian Palmer, but has left it in a “very difficult place”.

“I am unable to see clearly what the diocese may look like in the future,” Bishop Palmer said in a letter read out to parishes across the diocese.

“[The debt] is large and we cannot repay the bank in full.”

Read it all and the diocesan website is there.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* Economics, PoliticsEconomyThe Banking System/Sector* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

3 Comments
Posted October 8, 2013 at 7:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The church synod voted by a two-thirds majority to call for legal acknowledgment of civil unions between people of the same sex.

Rector of Darlington-Bellevue Anglican parish, the Reverend Chris Bedding, presented the motion to the synod.

"We presented a motion saying that the Anglican Church and the Diocese of Perth would like to acknowledge that legal recognition of same-sex relations can coexist with legal recognition of marriage between a man and a woman," he said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted October 8, 2013 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

If you can hear church bells ringing in Manly on Sunday night, the NRL premiership trophy is likely on its way back to the northern beaches.

Reverend Bruce Clarke from St Matthew's Anglican Church in Manly has cancelled his regular Sunday night service and will transform the house of God into an Eagles nest as a live viewing site for this year's grand final.

More than 300 people are expected to flood into the church to watch the Sea Eagles do battle against the Sydney Roosters. It will be the second time in three years the church has cancelled its Sunday night service for a Manly grand final.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchReligion & CultureSports* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

1 Comments
Posted October 3, 2013 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all (about 14 1/3 minutes).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted September 9, 2013 at 11:11 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Ever wanted to live in a landmark gothic mansion? Now's your chance ... if you have a spare $25 million.

Home to seven Anglican archbishops over more than a century, one of the city's largest private estates - it's a nifty 6216sq m - is up for grabs.

The historic Bishopscourt at 11 Greenoaks Ave, Darling Point, would be a nice piece of business for the Anglican Church Diocese of Sydney, which paid just 6750 pounds for the propery in 1910.

After decades of speculation both inside and outside the church, the Synod of the Anglican Diocese finally authorised the sale in 2012 with a five-year "sale window" option.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Economics, PoliticsEconomyHousing/Real Estate Market

0 Comments
Posted September 3, 2013 at 5:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* TheologySacramental TheologyEucharist

12 Comments
Posted August 16, 2013 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop Greg Thompson could return to the Hunter next year to become the new leader of the Anglican Diocese of Newcastle.

The Newcastle Synod will consider the sole candidate for the Bishop of Newcastle when it meets on Saturday, September 14.

Bishop Thompson is the current Bishop of the Northern Territory and was raised at Muswellbrook.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 13, 2013 at 7:31 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Davies dislikes factions, closed-door dealings and secrecy. He wants, he told me, "a diocese that is motivated by love and not by fear. Transparency is my word. And loving communication. I won't be drawn by nitpicking and infighting and savaging each other. We have seen a wonderfully unified synod in this election process that is the work of God's grace''. As Andrew Katay told me, Davies is "his own man with fresh ideas''.

Much like Pope Francis has found, I suspect Davies will be noticed first of all for a difference in tone. He speaks about needing to recognise the dignity of asylum seekers, and allow them to work instead of sticking them behind barbed wire with "looks of desperation''.

Davies is a true conservative, but is kindly, more tolerant of female preaching than his predecessor and, crucially, of dissent. People will not be blacklisted for airing different views. This could be the greatest sign of what promises to be a fascinating sea change in the Sydney Diocese.


Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 11, 2013 at 2:55 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dr Davies faced a range of newspaper and television reporters only 24 hours after he was elected, fielding questions ranging from refugees and asylum seekers to the role of the Anglican Church in contemporary Australia.

While some reports concentrated on his views on current debates, the Archbishop-elect was forthright in his comments on the challenge of mission in Sydney.

He told reporters he sought to “lead and galvanise the diocese in a unified concern to bring the love of God to the people of Sydney, the Illawarra, the Northern Beaches and the Blue mountains, so that God’s word might be preeminent and people understand the challenge that God’s word brings.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 11, 2013 at 2:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Sydney's first new Anglican Archbishop in more than a decade says he will use the role to lobby the Federal Government to treat asylum seekers with more dignity and humanity.

Bishop Glenn Davies was elected as the Anglican Church's 12th Archbishop of Sydney last night by the church's synod, or governing body.

The synod is make up of 800 members from 280 churches around the diocese.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

1 Comments
Posted August 9, 2013 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dr Davies will be installed as Sydney’s 12th Anglican Archbishop in St Andrew’s Cathedral on 23 August. Archbishop Aspinall will attend the service.

"I’ve known Glenn for many years," Archbishop Aspinall said. “I am sure I join the leaders of Australia’s other Anglican dioceses in welcoming Glenn, in praying for his leadership and in offering any practical help we can as he assumes these new responsibilities.

“Glenn is a well known and regarded contributor to the life of the national Church, having served on both the General Synod Standing Committee and the national Doctrine Commission for many years. He has demonstrated a commitment to listen, discuss and reflect upon issues that are sometimes painful and difficult, and to do so in a conciliatory way while holding on to his personal convictions. I see that as a hopeful sign for the future.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 7, 2013 at 5:48 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop Glenn Davies has been elected as the new Archbishop of Sydney.

Dr Davies was elected on Tuesday afternoon by the church's synod, the governing body comprised of 800 members from 280 churches around Sydney.

The church described Dr Davies' election victory as "overwhelming". But it was only reached after problems with vote tallying forced a recount.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 7, 2013 at 1:55 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

A synod of more than 800 members has overwhelmingly elected Bishop Glenn Davies as the 12th Archbishop of Sydney.

Dr Davies replaced Dr Peter Jensen who held the post for 12 years. For much of Archbishop Jensen's tenure, Dr Davies served with him as the Bishop of North Sydney.

Read it all and there is a biography here and the statement of Canon Rick Smith is here

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

13 Comments
Posted August 6, 2013 at 12:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

While we contend with the election of the next federal government and Prime Minister of Australia, there's another kind of political battle afoot in Sydney.

With the retirement of Peter Jensen last month, competition has been hotting up for who will be the next Anglican Archbishop of Sydney

ABC Religion & Ethics editor Scott Stephens outlined why the election is important and quirks of the Sydney Anglican community.

Listen to it all (a little under 16 minutes).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted August 6, 2013 at 7:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

More than 130 years after it was founded opposite St Peter's Cathedral, St Barnabas' Theological College is coming home to North ­Adelaide.

The college is planning a $1.3 million building behind the Anglican Archbishop's historic home, Bishop's Court, in Palmer Place.

Construction will start in October ahead of an opening next July.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologySeminary / Theological Education

0 Comments
Posted August 1, 2013 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In principle, what needs to be known about the nominees can already be known. It is a candidate’s past performance, outside the walls of Synod Hall, that really matters. Evidence can be gathered from the spheres in which his ministry has been exercised, for that evidence already exists in the real world amongst the real people who have experienced his ministry already. There is nothing mysterious about any candidate, the data simply needs to be gathered:

Has he been gospel focussed (or not)? Has he encouraged Christ’s mission (or not)? Does he clarify gospel truth and stand for it (or not)? Has he made good appointments of other people (or not)? Has he built and encouraged a ministry team (or not)? What is his track record of growing a congregation in strength and size (or not), or of successfully planting and growing new congregations (or not)? Does he know the world of the laity—has he encouraged ‘people like me’ in my part of Christ’s mission-field (or not)? Does he know the weaknesses and struggles of being a human being in a suffering world, so that, having been comforted himself, he can bring the comfort of the grace of God to others (or not)? Does he know how to encourage his fellow clergy to keep at their task of shepherding God’s flock with patience and joyful endurance (or not)?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted July 24, 2013 at 5:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The inference to be drawn from [Bill ] Lawton's argument is that an emphasis on discontinuous and futurist eschatology has had an impact on the way in which Anglicans from Sydney have responded to the rising tide of secularism since the 1960s. What I would like to show is that, while Sydney's Anglicans have not always responded well to the challenges of the new secularism, they were not in fact given to the kind of world-abandonment supposedly characteristic of them in the late nineteenth century.

The period of secularization following the 1960s does indeed have some strong echoes of the late nineteenth century. In between these two eras was the high-water mark of church influence in Australian life, and in Sydney especially. In the midst of the Great Depression, Sydney Anglicans like the extraordinary R.B.S. Hammond (1870-1946) at St Barnabas' Broadway distinguished themselves in remarkable service of the poor. The 1950s in particular was a time in which Australian society seemed more congenial to the influence of the church than it had been previously.

This was demonstrated by the dramatic impact of the Billy Graham crusade of 1959 - an event which had all the appearance of the dawn of a new glorious age of Christian social influence through the work of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of the thousands of people who went forward in Sydney and Melbourne. More than 130,000 people made a commitment to Christ, a figure which represents nearly 2% of the Australian population at the time.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: AnalysisAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* TheologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted July 16, 2013 at 5:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Bishop of Plymouth, Rt Revd John Ford, has been elected to serve as Diocesan Bishop of The Murray, South Australia.

The diocese has been without a bishop for three years and in a statement it said there was “great joy” in being able to announce Bishop John’s appointment as the fourth bishop of The Murray.

Bishop John has served as Bishop of Plymouth since 2005. He is married to Bridget and has three grown up children.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops

0 Comments
Posted July 5, 2013 at 2:34 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

BRISBANE's Anglican Archbishop Dr Phillip Aspinall has been accused of bullying in a discrimination complaint brought by a former church director, a tribunal has heard.

Lawyers for the Archbishop and the synod of Brisbane diocese have failed to get key elements of the sexual harassment and discrimination case thrown out of Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

Peta Smith, former executive director of the Anglican Schools Commission, lodged Anti-Discrimination Commission complaints in 2009, shortly before her five-year contract expired.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted May 14, 2013 at 3:39 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Archbishop Philip Freier, who led a team to Myanmar in February, is now promoting efforts – incorporating organisations and individuals beyond the diocese - to follow up the two week visit to the country which is only now emerging from 60 years of isolation under a military dictatorship.

In April, he hosted at Bishopscourt a diverse group of 35 people, including several Burmese clergy and other leaders, to discuss priorities in building on the links now established – which has already triggered further networking to plan action.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* International News & CommentaryAsiaMyanmar/Burma

0 Comments
Posted April 24, 2013 at 3:55 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

An historic Anglican church in Sydney's inner west has been gutted by fire.

Authorities say Dulwich Hill's Holy Trinity Church has been severely damaged by the blaze that broke out in the early hours of Sunday.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted April 21, 2013 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Among the statistics cited are theses:
One in every four young people will experience a mental disorder in any 12 month period (most commonly substance abuse or dependency, depression or anxiety, or a combination of these).

Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health issues experienced by young people, with around 30% of
adolescents experiencing a diagnosable depressive episode by the age of 18 years.

Mental disorders were the leading contributor to the burden of disease and injury (49%) among young Australians aged
15–24 years in 2003, with anxiety and depression being the leading specific cause for both males and females
Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenEducationMarriage & FamilyPsychologyReligion & CultureTeens / Youth* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted April 14, 2013 at 3:58 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This is my 12th and final Easter message as Archbishop of Sydney.

As I think on my time as Archbishop, naturally I look back and try to judge myself – not with much success!
Like you, I have a real judge. Think how much more God, who knows all the secrets of our hearts, must be able to hold me to account. It should make us tremble.

But I am filled with hope. Why?

Because of Easter. What happened at the first Easter reminds me of the love of God.

Through the death of Jesus even I, and all of us, can have forgiveness as we turn to him in sorrow and trust him for our lives. Our failures are not the last word over our lives. And, through the resurrection of Jesus I have a great and undeserved hope of my own resurrection and future.

I can only quote the words of John Newton, the man who wrote the song, Amazing Grace: ‘I am a great sinner, but Christ is a great Saviour’. Thank the love of God for that.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEaster

0 Comments
Posted March 31, 2013 at 5:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop [Ian] Palmer said the church needed to focus on its core roles during difficult times.

“I think we can meet the challenges we face by concentrating on our core business, which is drawing people into the worship of God and living in a way that expresses our love for God in and through our love for our neighbours,” he said.

A packed cathedral welcomed Bishop Palmer as the 10th Bishop of Bathurst.

Read it all and please note there is a slideshow with 14 different pictures available.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted February 11, 2013 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A moratorium on betting on some of our major sports, including football codes and cricket, should be considered for 2013 as one of the immediate responses to the Australian Crime Commission’s devastating report on Australian Sport, Bishop Philip Huggins said today.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchGambling

0 Comments
Posted February 9, 2013 at 3:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Canberra's Anglican Diocese has begun preparing historic and contemporary church documents which may be useful to the Royal Commission on Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

In a pastoral letter to the Anglican congregations and people of Canberra and Goulburn, Bishop Stuart Robinson said the diocese was entering into a new phase of ministry and care as the royal commission got under way.

''As your bishop I am calling us all to prayer; justice, compassion, transparency, truth and Christ's honour must be front and centre in all we do,'' Bishop Robinson wrote.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted February 3, 2013 at 3:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In Luke-Acts there are no less than sixteen texts that connect Luke’s narrative with famous named people in world history, like Sergius Paulus Proconsul of Cyprus, to take one example. Then there are dozens of lesser figures like the centurion Cornelius in Caesarea Maritima who are no less authentic. In other words, the geography, topography and history of the New Testament coheres with the geography and history of the era in which it is located. This is the more impressive because such references are made in passing, matters of incidental detail, easily missed because of the weightiness of the narrative.

Luke-Acts is an amazing text covering 70 years from the birth of John the Baptist to Paul’s imprisonment in Rome and represents 25% of the volume of the New Testament. It is widely commended by great secular historians like Mommsen, Meyer and Sherwin-White, but surprisingly spurned by many specialist Christian scholars. Crossan’s index to his Birth of Christianity, for example, does not have a single reference to the book of Acts and declared the first thirty years of Christian history to be ‘dark decades…cloaked in silence’. That is a convenient viewpoint if you want to write your own history of Christianity and present your own revisionist, designer theology! Luke-Acts is critical to recovering Christian origins, the beginnings of Christianity. Only this continuous text connects the rise of early Christianity to the impulse of Jesus, his identity, his saving death and his glorious resurrection.

Take the time to read it all and do not miss the wealth of good material at Bishop Barnett's website there (the above was his address this week at the Mere Anglicanism Conference).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch History* Culture-WatchHistory* TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted January 27, 2013 at 6:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Roman] Catholic school enrolments in the Maitland-Newcastle diocese are predicted to exceed 18,000 this year for the first time, as families choose Catholic schools over state schools.

There are no kindergarten vacancies in at least nine primary schools across the region, and very limited vacancies at many others.

The director of Catholic schools for the Maitland-Newcastle diocese, Ray Collins, said growth for the past four to five years was steady, with the greatest demand in the Maitland area.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenEducationMarriage & FamilyReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted January 25, 2013 at 3:10 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The change to the fourth Mark of Mission reflects the importance of God's mission in peace, conflict transformation and reconciliation.

ABM has responded by revising its fourth Mark of Mission to “Challenge violence, injustice and oppression, and work for peace and reconciliation”. Previously the fourth mark has been to “Challenge injustice and oppression”.

Education Missioner for ABM, Brad Chapman, explained that the Five Marks of Mission are more than just words.

"The Marks of Mission emerge from the lived experience of God's people throughout the Anglican Communion," Mr Chapman said. "They reflect God's active presence in the world today".

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Consultative CouncilAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted January 19, 2013 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Christmas is reconciliation time.

The carol says ‘God and sinners reconciled’. That’s us.

Fundamentally, we are out of sorts with God, we are trying to escape from him.

But God loved the world and sent his only Son, Jesus Christ. He draws near to us with mercy and forgiveness. The message of Christmas is - Be reconciled to God through his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsChristmas

0 Comments
Posted December 28, 2012 at 5:31 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This Christmas the American Atheists have posted a large billboard in Times Square New York. It has two pictures: one of Santa Claus and the other of Jesus on the cross. The captions under the pictures are “Keep the Merry” and “Dump the Myth”. Apart from having the captions under the wrong pictures, the sentiment is one I agree with.

Christmas is a merry season that is based on truth, not myth. Confusing the truth with myth doesn’t help people understand the event, or experience the merriment.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsChristmas

1 Comments
Posted December 27, 2012 at 3:45 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The spiritual leader of Australia's 3.5 million Anglicans, Phillip Aspinall, believes that priests may be able to report child abuse revealed during the rite of confession without breaking the seal of the confessional, putting him at odds with Catholics.

The Anglican Primate says the sanctity of the confessional should be examined by the royal commission into child sexual abuse called this week by Julia Gillard, which he regards as being a decade overdue.

Dr Aspinall's predecessor as Archbishop of Brisbane, Peter Hollingworth - who lost his job as governor-general after a scandal erupted over his handling of sex-abuse cases in the diocese - also backed the inquiry.

Dr Hollingworth warned yesterday that the abuse of children was "more widespread than previously thought", and welcomed the royal commission as an important national initiative and a means to help victims.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchChildrenLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureSexuality* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

2 Comments
Posted November 16, 2012 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At 4.06pm, less than 30 minutes before Synod rose for the year, the first count of this year’s meeting was held on a proposed amendment during a debate on church planting (the establishment of new congregations across Melbourne and Geelong). This time, the amendment was carried.

Synod called on the Diocesan Council to review how the living requirements of clergy in the Melbourne Diocese were met, including the setting of stipends, recompense for travel costs, housing, superannuation, benefits, stipend continuance insurance and retrenchment.

A senior clergyman, the Revd Dr David Powys of St John's Cranbourne, said in his mover's speech that the fundamental way in which clergy remuneration and provisions were conceived had not changed very much in 30 years but "very many other things" about ordained ministry had changed very substantially. These included the dwindling proportion of clergy who were vicars, a reduction in ministry households where the stipend was the main source of income, the decline in clergy living in vicarages and church-owned accommodation, the increasing number of clergy in part-time appointments and the fact that women now made up a significant proportion of clergy ranks.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the OrdainedStewardship* Economics, PoliticsEconomyCorporations/Corporate LifeLabor/Labor Unions/Labor Market* TheologyEcclesiologyPastoral Theology

1 Comments
Posted October 25, 2012 at 3:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Melbourne’s Anglican Synod contemplated its own future – and that of the way the Church prepares candidates for ordination and provides continuing professional development for clergy – on its third night, Friday 19 October.

Synod commended a review of its own size and composition that proposed that lay parish representatives be in proportion to full-time equivalent ministry staff in each parish. It endorsed the principle that its House of Laity should have at least as many members as its House of Clergy and asked the Diocesan Council, which meets regularly between sessions of Synod, to bring recommendations on clergy representation to next year’s Synod with a view to introducing new representation in time for the 52nd Synod, which is to meet from 2016-18.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted October 24, 2012 at 6:46 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I see three particular fruits of the Second Vatican Council as significant for Anglicans, and other non-Roman Christian traditions.

First was putting the liturgy into the vernacular: the Mass was no longer a mystery, but something all could understand. ICET's Prayers we have in Common emerged in 1970, and many saw that we were closer theologically than previously realised. One unhappy consequence was growing misunderstanding of 'hospitality': few non-RCs would want to receive communion at a Latin Mass (and only a small proportion of Catholics then did so regularly).

Common language, and reception becoming normal across most Christian traditions, saw hospitality become a possibility — and a barrier.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

4 Comments
Posted October 20, 2012 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Adelaide diocese of the Anglican Church must change radically as it faces the tough choice of closing at least a third of its parishes within the next five years.

This was the blunt message from Archbishop Jeffrey Driver to the church last night as he opened its senior decision-making forum, the diocesan synod.

Resources had been drained and the church had endured nine years of turmoil from dealing with the hurt caused by abuse perpetuated by its own ranks.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Economics, PoliticsEconomyThe Banking System/Sector* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted October 20, 2012 at 8:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In his last presidential speech before retirement, Dr Jensen said society's shift towards ''deadly individualism'' had been driven by material wealth and technological mastery.
The cost of individualism, and the shift to self-love, had consequences for the quality of our community, family life and how we treat death. That was evident in the choice of ''our swan song of this generation'', Frank Sinatra's classic I Did It My Way, Dr Jensen said in his speech, titled ''Last Words''.
''It seems that we do not need each other as once we did. Nor do we need God. To think that a person is so proud of the phrase 'I did it my way' that they would use it as a summary of their life's achievement reveals an astounding moral ineptitude, a sort of vulgar egotism.''

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted October 10, 2012 at 4:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We are in a place and time of growing evangelistic opportunity and obligation....Our secure, wealthy and beautiful region is alive with people, especially new people. Many of these people know nothing about Jesus and they need to hear about the way to eternal life. We are here for them. It is as simple as that....

You could say [after looking at the statistic profile of Australia's spiritual landscape], don’t fret: Our business is to look after the religious needs of the descendants of the English. We are a declining chaplaincy church. Christianity is a religion of consolation rather than salvation.

You had better say: The gospel itself utterly forbids us to think like that. The gospel addresses all men and women without exception in the same tone of voice, with the same demands and the same promises, the same Lord and the same Saviour. It is a matter of salvation, not consolation: of salvation, not of growing our numbers. Any gospel church is aptly described as One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic, universal words which embrace all nations and peoples and languages. If our denomination, will not accept the challenge posed by the new and increasingly different world which has come to us, we are not being faithful to the gospel which has formed our churches and saved our souls.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryEvangelism and Church Growth* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyPastoral TheologySoteriology

1 Comments
Posted October 9, 2012 at 10:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Revd Gloria Shipp, from the Gamilaroi tribe in New South Wales, has been elected Chair of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Anglican Council (NATSIAC) by members at their Annual Gathering in Brisbane.

Ms Shipp, the Indigenous Ministry Coordinator and Chaplain at Orana Juvenile Justice Centre in the Parish of Dubbo (Diocese of Bathurst), is the first woman to be elected as Chair, having previously held the Treasurer’s position.

She said she was “excited and honoured” to be elected Chair.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

0 Comments
Posted October 8, 2012 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Church in Melbourne said today it welcomed the announcement by the Victorian government that it will increase its funding to tackle family violence by $16 million.

Bishop Philip Huggins, Chair of the Melbourne Anglican Social Responsibilities Committee, said: “This is a timely and compassionate response to the evidence of a growing need for services to tackle the problem. This week’s release of new statistics demonstrates that the crime rate is rising. Police are reported to attribute this largely to a rise in family violence-related crime which climbed by 39.9%!

“Tragically, more than 100,000 women in Australia experience violence by a partner or ex-partner. At least 60% of these cases are witnessed by children. We must do all we can to prevent such suffering.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenReligion & CultureViolenceWomen* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted September 6, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The call has gone out to help save a local church dating back almost 150 years.

The All Saints Church in Lawrence is one of five Anglican churches in the Maclean parish.

All Saints warden Terry Bird said the Grafton diocese had ordered a review of Maclean Parish and wanted one, possibly two, local churches to close.

"As in many other country dioceses, the Grafton diocese has requested the Maclean Parish review the number of centres and reduce the number by at least one," Mr Bird said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry

1 Comments
Posted September 6, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A post-adoption support group has welcomed a move by the Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane to apologise for forced adoptions.

Dr Phillip Aspinall yesterday apologised to families affected by the policies used at St Mary's Home at Toowong and The Church of England Women's Refuge at Spring Hill.

Between 1951 and 1975 it is estimated up to 150,000 unmarried women across Australia were forced to give up their babies.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenHistoryReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted September 1, 2012 at 11:05 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

On Friday the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane released a statement saying it was sorry, and acknowledging the church's role in forced adoptions.

In the apology, Brisbane Archbishop Phillip Aspinall said mothers had suffered shame, isolation and humiliation while in the care of the church, resulting in significant grief and loss.

"We deeply regret that we did not always provide the care, information, protection and support which these mothers, fathers and children should have received," Dr Aspinall said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchChildrenMarriage & Family* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 31, 2012 at 4:12 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The role of deacons in Australia has had a seismic shift in the past 20 years and the Church needs to review, clarify and educate Anglican leaders and members about this distinctive ministry, starting with a revision of the Ordinal, Bishop Tom Frame said in Melbourne recently.

Dr Frame, the Director of St Mark's National Theological Centre in Canberra, said he was increasingly of the view that the distinctiveness of the diaconate would be protected and preserved by a change in the Church’s approach to ordination. There was no Biblical warrant or scriptural injunction for the custom that candidates destined for priesthood be ordained deacons first.

He told the annual gathering of Melbourne deacons at Christ Church South Yarra on 7 August that a critical difference between priestly and diaconal ministries seemed to be evolving, with the former’s emphasis being on the gathered community (ministry) and the latter being most active with those not active in the Church (mission).

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 30, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A biography of Northern Territory indigenous leader and Anglican priest, Gumbuli of Ngukurr, has been chosen as Australian Christian Book of the Year from more than 40 entrants – and given Melbourne publishing house Acorn Press, co-founded by the late Bishop John Wilson, its second consecutive win in the awards.

The author, Melbourne Anglican Dr Murray Seiffert, received the award at the annual awards evening organised by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Australia and the Australian Christian Literature Society at St Alfred’s Anglican Church, Blackburn North, on 16 August.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchBooksReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted August 24, 2012 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Australians must understand that conservative Christian lobbyists do not speak for all people of the faith, according to the Brisbane Anglican leader heading a new progressive advocacy group.

The Very Reverend Peter Catt, the Dean of St John's Cathedral, announced yesterday the creation of the new group called A Progressive Christian Voice (Australia).

He said the aim of the group was not to be in conflict with the Australian Christian Lobby, which often argued for conservative positions on issues such as gay marriage and surrogacy, but to ensure there were several Christian voices in public debates.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* Religion News & CommentaryOther Churches* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 23, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The disciplinary processes for dealing with rogue priests in almost every Anglican diocese in Australia are in doubt because of a landmark court challenge to their validity.

The head of the Anglican Church in Australia, Dr Phillip Aspinall, has asked to be heard in the legal action, which could open the floodgates for civil claims against the Church by priests who have been sacked or disciplined.

The application filed on behalf of Dr Aspinall warns that if the challenge to the standards ordinance succeeds, "it may have widespread and adverse consequences for all of the dioceses that make up the Anglican Church of Australia".

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 18, 2012 at 10:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Prostitutes have been using a Woodville Gardens church garage to solicit men.

Father Graham Head said the St Augustine of Canterbury Anglican Church was aware for some time that women had been using the grounds surrounding the church for the illegal activity.

Father Head said the tenant, who is now being evicted, denied all knowledge of the activity. He did not suggest she was involved but said she was given an eviction notice in April so the house can be used by the church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

2 Comments
Posted August 17, 2012 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Anglican Bishop Stuart Robinson fears changes to the ACT Discrimination Act could lead to religious disputes ending up in court and increase tension between faiths.

The head of the Canberra and Goulburn Archdiocese has also criticised the ACT government for not consulting religious leaders about the proposed changes, which will make religious vilification in the territory illegal....

Bishop Robinson said he supported improving basic human rights, especially the freedom to choose and practise a religion. But he said open societies also gave citizens the right to disagree on religious beliefs and practices.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

1 Comments
Posted August 16, 2012 at 5:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Contrary to Fr Christopher Seton’s reported comments (“New world order as Anglican priests move to a Catholic environment”, The Age, 8/8), the Anglican Church respects those who cannot accept, in good conscience, the ordination of women to the priesthood and the episcopate....Moreover, Fr Seton’s reported assertion “that you’ve got to believe in same-sex marriage” to remain in the Anglican Church is inaccurate and misplaced.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchMediaReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman CatholicPope Benedict XVI* Theology

1 Comments
Posted August 9, 2012 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Christopher Seton leaves one job on September 2 and starts another six days later. In one sense it is exactly the same job, and in another it is completely different. Father Seton is one of four Anglican priests who will be ordained into the Catholic Church in Melbourne on September 8.

Father Seton holds his last service at All Saints Kooyong on September 2. Then he and - so far as he is aware - his entire congregation will regather a week later at the Holy Cross Catholic Church in Caulfield South. There he will minister to the same people (and, doubtless, some new ones), using the same liturgy and singing the same hymns. But now they will be on the opposite side of a once-bitter sectarian divide.

''In a sense, we are just moving office,'' Father Seton said yesterday. But he, along with Fathers James Grant, Ramsay Williams and Neil Fryer, will now be priests in the Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross, the Catholic Church's new Anglican wing set up by Pope Benedict for those who felt disenfranchised by the ordination of women and other developments in the Anglican Church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman CatholicPope Benedict XVI* TheologyAnthropologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted August 9, 2012 at 3:40 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Chris Mulherin, featured here on Eureka Street TV, similarly has a foot in both camps; an Anglican clergyman with a substantial academic background studying and lecturing in science and the philosophy of science.

He is now doing his doctorate on the relationship between scientific and theological ways of knowing. He argues they are different but complementary ways of understanding, and summarises the difference by saying that while science deals with mechanics, religion deals with meaning....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchPhilosophyReligion & CultureScience & Technology* Religion News & CommentaryOther FaithsAtheism

0 Comments
Posted July 28, 2012 at 4:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Clarence Valley celebrates the first Grafton woman to be accepted into the role of Archdeacon this morning as Reverend Gail Hagon of the Anglican Diocese of Grafton takes on the most senior position in the life of the church.

"While I accept my new role with honour, in some ways I'm not about hierarchical structure," [the] Rev[.] Hagon said.

"I am passionate about what I do and what I believe in."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained

2 Comments
Posted July 28, 2012 at 12:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A variety of tools and gadgets will be presented at St Paul's Anglican Church on Sunday morning to celebrate the business end of the financial year.

St Paul's assistant priest reverend Mark Vincent said everything from shovels, trolleys, mobile phones and tablets are welcome at the ceremony.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchReligion & CultureScience & Technology

1 Comments
Posted June 20, 2012 at 3:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Church heavyweights have been spurred into action by the bills, with the heads of the Catholic, Anglican and Greek Orthodox churches issuing strong statements to their congregations yesterday urging them to oppose any move towards same-sex marriage.

The Anglican Archbishop of Sydney, Peter Jensen, wrote a letter to parishioners that was then distributed to the rectors of every Anglican church within the diocese. It was up to individual church leaders to decide whether to read the letter to congregations or simply make a copy available to them.

''It is likely that some time in the near future our parliamentary representatives will be asked to vote on a proposal to change the legal definition of marriage,'' the letter reads.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted June 18, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A German-born university chaplain has been appointed head of Melbourne's flagship Anglican church, St Paul's Cathedral.

The Reverend Dr Andreas Loewe, senior chaplain at the University of Melbourne, will be installed as Dean of the cathedral, the church announced on Sunday.

Dr Loewe, 39, succeeds Bishop Mark Burton, who resigned earlier this year.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained

0 Comments
Posted June 17, 2012 at 6:20 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I’ve tried to understand what matters most to those who want ‘marriage equality’. The arguments go like this. Current law affects gay and lesbian mental health because it discriminates against them, and so denies them basic human rights (to marry whomever they want and to not experience discrimination). ‘Marriage equality’ affirms gays and lesbians in their identity and ends the ‘state-sanctioned bullying’ they take to be inherent to marriage law. ‘Marriage equality’ celebrates love and gives people what they want – so extending the freedom of choice that we demand of a liberal society.

Let’s observe the assumptions in these claims.

Firstly, love is the sole defining element of marriage. Second, any assertion that gay and lesbian people are different psychologically damages them. Third, it is the state’s responsibility to limit such damage. Finally, every society and generation can renegotiate marriage as it sees fit. A deep attachment to – and ‘love’ for – this cluster of ideas drives the quest for marriage revision.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

1 Comments
Posted June 13, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Anglican Archbishop Jeffrey Driver has accused the Commonwealth government of gambling with the future of young Australians as it considers changes to gambling regulations.

Proposed changes to online betting laws outlined in the government’s interim report on the Review of the Interactive Gambling Act 2001 include the legalisation of new forms of online gambling that the Archbishop believes could create a new wave of problem gamblers.

“The proposed changes to online betting have the potential to open up more opportunities for Australians, especially young Australians, to gamble online,” Archbishop Driver said. “Young people are the most attuned to the digital revolution but also the most vulnerable to its disadvantages or dangers.”

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* Culture-WatchGamblingReligion & Culture* Economics, PoliticsEconomy* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

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Posted June 10, 2012 at 12:38 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

It seems to me, from my now thirty years in Melbourne Diocese, that the hierarchy, supported by many of the clergy, have launched into politics and socio-economics, not because they are aflame with the Gospel, but as a last ditch attempt to find relevance in society. Hence the recent attack on the banks appears to be a natural extension of this process.

Unless Anglicanism can set out on the difficult journey of faith recovery, we can expect to hear more about ageing gracefully, the violence of Melbourne’s CBD, climate change and the evils of banking and gambling. But don’t expect to hear too much of Jesus – nor of contentious moral issues. An Anglicanism of compassion without faith and sound doctrine is no longer a church but a socio-political organisation.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

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Posted June 2, 2012 at 11:46 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Archbishop of Melbourne, Dr Philip Freier, has finished a whirlwind four-day trip to central Victoria.

The Archbishop yesterday met clergy and various leaders in Bendigo.

“Part of my role as the Archbishop of Melbourne is to have a relationship with the other Anglican diocese in Victoria,” he said.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia

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Posted May 31, 2012 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaGlobal South Churches & PrimatesFCA Meeting in London April 2012* TheologyEcclesiology

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Posted May 30, 2012 at 7:34 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bathursty will become the sixth diocese in Australia to formalise the relationship between its Anglican and Catholic churches when Bishops Richard Hurford and Bishop Michael McKenna sign a covenant of friendship next week.
Representatives will travel from across the state on Thursday to witness the historic event, which will consolidate the connection between the two Christian denominations.

Catholic Bishop McKenna said the covenant was a celebration of a “long-standing friendship and cooperation”.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

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Posted May 20, 2012 at 2:22 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Pope Benedict XVI will continue the expansion of the new Catholic Church structure created for former Anglicans by launching an ordinariate for Australia on June 15.

“I am confident that those former Anglicans who have made a journey in faith that has led them to the Catholic Church will find a ready welcome,” said Archbishop Denis Hart of Melbourne, who serves as president of the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of Australia* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman CatholicPope Benedict XVI

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Posted May 13, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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