Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

We announced last month on August 20th that the Standing Committee and I were in agreement on a course of action regarding the future of the Diocese of South Carolina and the challenges many of us face because of decisions by the recent General Convention of the Episcopal Church. However, for many reasons it was then and is now, imprudent to reveal that course of action. Things are progressing—we have not stopped or dropped the ball. Please know that I understand the level of anxiety and concern of many in the diocese. Nevertheless I must ask you all for your continued patience and prayers as we seek to deal wisely and carefully with a fluid situation that requires great discernment and sensitivity on a regular basis. I will communicate to you the details at the very earliest moment such a communication is prudent.

Faithfully yours in Christ,

--(The Rt. Rev.) Mark J. Lawrence is Bishop of South Carolina


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SchoriTEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South Carolina* South Carolina* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral TheologyTheology: Scripture

4 Comments
Posted September 22, 2012 at 8:52 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop Alphonza Gadsden was one of two Reformed Episcopal Church Bishops, and three Reformed Episcopal Church leaders, who attended and processed in the Eucharist at the recent diocese of South Carolina Convention.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause PartnershipEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Diocesan Conventions/Diocesan Councils* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical Relations

2 Comments
Posted April 1, 2010 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

This elf has been slacking lately and it is only today that it dawned on me that we need a new ACNA category on the blog. So from today onwards, you will now find all stories related to the ACNA here: Anglican Church in North America (ACNA)

News stories, primary source documents and commentary specifically about this week's ACNA Assembly will be found here: ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009. (we have re-categorized relevant blog entries from the past week or so)

All past blog entries about the ACNA from the past 6-7 months are under this category: --Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province* Admin

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 9:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet

4 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 8:03 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rev. Craige Borrett, my coworker in the parish where I serve, is going to watch and take notes and report to the diocese. I am posting this because I have already gotten many questions about it.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province* South Carolina

9 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The link and the schedule is here.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:39 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

As a result of developments in the Diocese of Springfield, Bishop The Rt. Rev. Peter Beckwith, Bishop of Springfield, will not be attending the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) Assembly which is scheduled to begin tomorrow at St. Vincent’s Cathedral in Bedford, Texas.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Bishops

20 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rev. Bill Thompson, Rector of All Saints Anglican Church, Long Beach, California, is the first Bishop of the Diocese of Western Anglicans of the Anglican Church in North America.

“My first reaction upon my election,” the Bishop‐elect said, “was to feel very humbled that the College of Bishops felt that I was the person to do this job. Being the Bishop of Western Anglicans is a job that neither I nor anyone else can do on their own. I will need the prayers, support, and hard work, of many to make our diocese what God wants it to be.”

Read the whole thing.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



This clip includes brief comments from Bishop Iker and Bishop Duncan among others.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province* Culture-WatchMovies & Television

1 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

3 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:18 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Episcopal Bishop Jerry Lamb announced that the first service at St. Paul's in Modesto will be held July 5 at 10 a.m., instead of the two services originally scheduled.

He said a diocesan committee decided it would be better to have everyone gathered at one time to celebrate the renewal of Episcopal services at the church on Oakdale Road just south of Briggsmore....

Also last week, the nine other self-incorporated parishes with ties to the Anglican diocese headquartered in Fresno received letters from Lamb "to arrange the transition of all properties and assets back to the Episcopal Church." Two of those parishes are St. Francis in Turlock and St. James (the historic Red Church) in Sonora....

The Rev. Gerry Grossman, pastor of St. Francis, said Lamb's letter "amounts to the harassment of a local congregation by a national organization. We've received 'invitations' from him before, but this is the first request to, quote, "give back" something that's ours. We're not going to have this taken from us. The story of David and Goliath comes to mind."

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: San Joaquin

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop Robert Duncan of Pittsburgh, who led the network of hundreds of congregations that broke from The Episcopal Church for the past five years under the banner of the Anglican Communion Network, will be installed as the new church body’s first archbishop on June 24 at Christ Church in Plano, Texas. Visiting bishops from as far away as South America, Africa and Asia, representing millions of Anglicans, are expected to attend the June 22-25 assembly.

“We look forward to celebrating the miracle that is the formation of a biblical, missionary and united Anglican Church in North America,” Duncan said in the days leading up to the assembly. “This meeting is historic because it heals decades of division and represents the answer to many years of prayer. It will be a momentous time for orthodox Anglicans everywhere.”

Leaders in the Anglican Communion Network – which will cease operation when the new province launches – had been calling on The Episcopal Church to repent and to get back in line with traditional Anglicanism and Scripture since it consecrated an openly gay bishop in 2003. But over the past couple of years, Duncan and other conservative bishops saw little hope that the U.S. church body would change direction from what breakaway Anglicans claim to be a departure from Christian orthodoxy.

Read the whole article.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Ian] Douglas is not convinced that this week's assembly is all that important.

"I've seen it before," he said, referring to earlier gatherings of those disenchanted with the Episcopal Church.

But another Episcopal priest, the Rev. William Sachs – a historian and author of the forthcoming book Homosexuality and the Crisis of Anglicanism – called the Bedford meeting "a very big deal."

He said the new group will be taken much more seriously if it emerges seeming united and willing to work through established procedures for recognition by the Anglican Communion.

Sachs added: "The challenge before them is to come out of there with a message that is positive and distinctive and not simply a shared spirit of protest."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 6:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A congregation in York expects to be part of a proposed Anglican province in the U.S. whose leaders meet this week in Bedford, Texas.

In its 10th year, St. Alban Anglican Church meets in the basement chapel of Trinity United Church of Christ downtown and averages six to nine worshippers at Mass.

Parishioners said Sunday they're excited about being part of a larger church body.

"If you want to have something going for the future generations, you need to be part of something bigger," said the Rt. Rev. Barry E. Yingling, parish rector. "So you're taken seriously."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

St. John's Anglican Church in Vancouver will join a new group of conservative parishes, the latest move in an ideological battle over same-sex marriage with the local Anglican authority.

St. John's Rev. Canon David Short will be in Texas this week for meetings to create the Anglican Church of North America. It will include roughly 700 parishes, which are united in their belief in orthodox principles. All 30 parishes that make up the conservative Anglican Network in Canada will join.

The new group will be a permanent home for St. John's, the largest Canadian Anglican parish, with four services and roughly 1,000 worshippers most Sundays.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 6:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The head of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, is sending a "pastoral visitor" from his staff, says Duncan, which he says shows that "we are part of the family."

Williams himself will attend the Episcopal Church's governing meeting this summer to give a seminar on combating global poverty.

Jurisdictions that have joined together to form the 28 dioceses and dioceses-in-formation of the Anglican Church in North America are: the dioceses of Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, Quincy and San Joaquin; the Anglican Mission in the Americas (including the Anglican Coalition in Canada); the Convocation of Anglicans in North America; the Anglican Network in Canada; the Reformed Episcopal Church; and the missionary initiatives of Kenya, Uganda, and South America's Southern Cone. The American Anglican Council and Forward in Faith North America also are founding organizations.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Representatives from breakaway Episcopal congregations and dioceses — bound together in opposition to gay priests and same-sex marriage as well as in their desire to preach the Gospel — will gather here this week to create a new Anglican province.

Some say the provincial assembly gathered at St. Vincent’s Episcopal Cathedral Church in Bedford may create something geographically unprecedented in the United States: a second Anglican province.

One province would be the new and theologically conservative Anglican Church in North America; the other, the established and theologically liberal U.S. Episcopal Church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 22, 2009 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In his office at the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh (Anglican), Bishop Robert Duncan has mounted a Scottish broadsword, like that of the hero in his favorite movie, "Braveheart." It was a gift from a priest after the Episcopal Church accepted a partnered gay bishop.

The legend of "Braveheart" "is about somebody who rallies people to stand up against what is very wrong," Bishop Duncan said. "It's a two-edged sword, and the holy scriptures describe scripture as sharper than any two-edged sword."

Tomorrow in Texas, he is slated to become archbishop of the new Anglican Church in North America. Its 100,000 members broke with the Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada, believing they failed to uphold biblical authority and classic doctrine about Jesus when they approved the consecration of a partnered gay bishop and failed to discipline another bishop who denied Jesus was God incarnate.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

5 Comments
Posted June 21, 2009 at 6:26 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The status of the new Anglican Church in North America, of which Archbishop-elect Duncan will lead, remains uncertain within the global Anglican Communion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted June 21, 2009 at 5:43 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Martyn Minns recalls the moment he knew he had to leave the Episcopal Church, the U.S. branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It was 2005. He was rector of Truro Church in Fairfax, Va., and he was talking with a young family who told him they could no longer attend a church that accepted gay bishops or diverged from what they called Orthodox Christianity.

"As I looked at them, I realized that I had a decision to make," he says. "Either I moved with them into a rather uncertain future, or I lost the heart of the congregation. So for me it was a matter of, 'Do I want the church of the future, or the church of the past?' "

Soon after that, Minns' church bolted from the American Episcopal Church and aligned itself with the conservative archbishop of the Anglican province of Nigeria. Now he and other church leaders representing more than 700 congregations, four dioceses and up to 100,000 churchgoers are meeting in Bedford, Texas. They hope to form a new Anglican province in the U.S. — one that would rival the Episcopal Church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts

1 Comments
Posted June 21, 2009 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

5 Comments
Posted June 20, 2009 at 11:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Springfield, Illinois – June 19, 2009

Notwithstanding suggestions to the contrary, Bishop Beckwith remains a faithful Christian within The Episcopal Church (TEC) as the Bishop Diocesan of Springfield, and intends to keep that status intact. Bishop Beckwith has also served as the Vice President of the American Anglican Council (AAC) for a number of years. A majority of AAC’s membership consists of communicants of The Episcopal Church. It is in this capacity that he has been involved in the Anglican Communion Network (ACN) and the Common Cause Partnership (CCP). Any involvement in the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) Assembly scheduled for next week in Bedford, Texas, would be limited to being an observer. Furthermore, as an Episcopalian, Bishop Beckwith was asked to be a TEC Liaison to the Ecumenical Relations Task Force. In no sense is he a structural part of either the Task Force, or the ACNA.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC Conflicts

13 Comments
Posted June 19, 2009 at 5:47 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Episcopal Church of Rwanda has elected three new Bishops to serve in one of the provinces of the Anglican Church in North America.

The election took place on Saturday 13 at the Anglican Diocese of Kigali.

The Bishops who were elected are: The Rev. DR. Todd Hunter, The Rev. Canon Doc Loomis and Rev. Silas TAK Yin Ng.

According to the communiqué the first two bishops will serve in US while one Silas TAK Yin Ng will serve in Canada.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of RwandaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

29 Comments
Posted June 18, 2009 at 4:40 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Church in North America will be formally founded next week, challenging the legitimacy of the U.S. Episcopal Church and posing a dilemma for the worldwide Anglican Communion over who represents Anglicanism in the United States and Canada.

When 232 delegates to the ACNA convention at St. Vincent's Cathedral in Bedford, Texas, approve the organization's constitution and canons on Monday, Pittsburgh Bishop Robert Duncan will become archbishop for this "emerging" 39th province of the communion, consisting of several groupings that have left the Episcopal Church over issues related to sexuality and biblical authority.

A ceremony celebrating Bishop Duncan's installation is set for June 24 at Christ Church in the Dallas suburb of Plano, the ACNA's largest parish, with more than 2,000 members. Also among the ACNA's members are 11 Northern Virginia parishes, including the historic The Falls Church and Truro parishes, which left the Episcopal Church to found the Convocation of Anglicans in North America.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

15 Comments
Posted June 17, 2009 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Bishops

0 Comments
Posted June 17, 2009 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Three Christian leaders, Pastor Rick Warren, Metropolitan Jonah, and the Rev. Todd Hunter have agreed to be among those addressing the organizing Assembly of the Anglican Church in North America scheduled for June 22–25 at St. Vincent’s Cathedral in Bedford, Texas.

Pastor Rick Warren, author of The Purpose Driven Life and pastor of Saddleback Church, will speak on June 23. Warren, a longtime friend of orthodox Anglicans, has been repeatedly recognized as a key spiritual leader in America. Named “America’s Most Influential Pastor” by Christianity Today in 2003, Warren has also been called one of “America’s 25 Best Leaders” (US News and World Report 2006), and one of the “15 People Who Make America Great” (Newsweek 2006). Saddleback Church, founded by Warren in 1980, is an innovative evangelical congregation of 22,000 in Lake Forest California.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

7 Comments
Posted June 16, 2009 at 12:03 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Third reason refers to other concerns that have been articulated about structure and governance in Articles IV to XIV. Some point out that this ecclesiastical structure and way of operating is rather novel and does not continue the patterns with which we are familiar in North America. That is true. Those of us who have lived and exercised leadership in those familiar patterns find these new ways bear a note of fresh air, wisdom and promise. Let’s give them a try. If they prove to be cumbersome or lop-sided in any way, we can alter them. The procedures to make modifications are in place in the Proposed Constitution.

In summary, by all means, let us move ahead. Let us make our concerns clear so that the Council can do its work between Assemblies, just as we all in our dioceses, units, and congregations will have work to do. But, let us sign the Proposed Constitution so that we can do this together, as one in the Lord.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted June 9, 2009 at 5:06 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Canons restore the Catholic teaching concerning Christian Marriage as a lifelong union of one man and one woman, restoring the impediments to valid marriage historically a part of Catholic practice enshrined in Anglican Canon and repealed by The Episcopal Church in 1973. Remarriage after a civil divorce is permitted only if one of the impediments to a valid marriage is determined to have existed, or if the divorce is for the permitted circumstances in Our Lord's teaching in Matthew's Gospel, chapter 19, or St. Paul's exception in 1 Corinthian 7.

The Canons make it clear that sexual relations are permitted only between a man and a woman within the confines of holy matrimony. Fornication and adultery, including all homosexual acts, are prohibited. Further, the Canons affirm the sanctity of every human life from conception to natural death.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

10 Comments
Posted June 9, 2009 at 4:31 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Editor's Note:Bishop Robert Duncan, Bishop of Pittsburgh and moderator of the Common Cause Partnership gives his view on the proposed Constitution and Canons of the Anglican Church in North America

How do we renew what was best about the tradition that produced us? How do we not repeat the patterns that subverted our life as a biblical and missionary province? How do we adapt learnings from the vibrant newer branches of the Anglican Communion? How do we restore our role as the bridge among and between the various denominational expressions of the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church? How do we have both freedom and accountability? How can we be truly catholic, truly evangelical, truly charismatic and truly conciliar in a 21st century context – both North American and global? These are all questions that shaped the deliberations of the Governance Task Force, and the wider consultations the Governance Task Force undertook, and that resulted in the Constitution and Canons proposed for ratification at the inaugural Provincial Assembly of the Anglican Church in North America.

The Constitution and Canons go much further than anyone imagined possible just a year ago....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

12 Comments
Posted June 8, 2009 at 11:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I debated posting an excerpt, but there is simply too much there and I do not want to lead you in any direction. You just need to read it--and, yes, all of it--very carefully. It has so much to say about the current situation in the Episcopal Church--KSH.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

15 Comments
Posted June 6, 2009 at 11:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Leaders of a conservative group of Anglicans in the United States will hold an organizational meeting later this month.

The inaugural assembly of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) will take place at the end of June in Bedford, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. The meeting will bring together more than 700 congregations into a growing North American province in the worldwide Anglican Communion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

4 Comments
Posted June 2, 2009 at 1:12 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted May 22, 2009 at 12:38 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

“We want the rest of the church to know that our bishop has our support,” said the Very Rev. Peter J.A. Cook, president of the Western Louisiana standing committee and rector of St. Michael and All Angels’ Church, Lake Charles. He added that the standing committee and the bishop have no plans to leave, but are committed to working for reform from within the church.

Fr. Cook said the statement also was intended to prepare the diocese for the possibility that it will need to approve the proposed Anglican Covenant on its own if General Convention fails to do so when it meets in Anaheim later this summer.

“If General Convention does not approve the Covenant or fails to consider it, I’d be most surprised if our diocese did not take up a resolution to approve it for ourselves with the encouragement of our bishop,” he said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Polity & Canons

4 Comments
Posted May 9, 2009 at 5:27 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Eastertide, 2009

Dear Friends in Christ:

I am writing to you with news that may not be surprising to some, but may require some explanation for others. After over 13 years of discernment, I will be chrismated and received into the Eastern Orthodox Church on Orthodox Pentecost, June 7th. I will be making my church home at St. George Antiochian Cathedral in Oakland (Pittsburgh) along with my husband Chris, who was received in November 2007, my oldest daughter Meredith, my son-in-law Josh, my grand-daughter Katherine, and the child soon to be born into their family. Though my husband and my daughter became Orthodox before me, our attraction together to the Orthodox Church began several years before our move to Pittsburgh.

I understand that some will not understand why I am doing this, since we have worked together for the health of the Anglican communion, and since many Anglicans are now realigned and looking towards the recognition of a newly formed North American province. Please be assured that my efforts for our communion have always been wholehearted, and hopeful. Once the leaders of TEC and the Anglican Church of Canada made it clear that they were not prepared to walk with the historic Church and the rest of the Anglican communion in areas of ethics and doctrine, the Realignment seemed to me the most authentic response for faithful Anglicans: unrepentant heterodoxy must be given a clear answer. While in Jerusalem and Jordan I was very encouraged by the ability of leaders with different expressions of Anglicanism to listen and to learn from each other, and was optimistic that the interplay between evangelicals, charismatics and anglo-catholics would bring about something very good. I pray that God will continue to guide Anglicans who care about orthodoxy and right practice in the Anglican communion.

At the same time, I have wondered for several years about the possibility of our continuing together, given the foundational differences that we have in our understanding of the Church, of the sacraments, and of the place of tradition. Recent developments, including the continuing autonomy of AMIA within the proposed new Province, suggestions that we can continue in parallel with TEC, Primatial statements that expressed satisfaction with the last Primates’ meeting when it seems to contradict GAFCON, and continued attention to pragmatics rather than to the nature of the Church have been very problematic, in my view. All the while, I have been drawn for some time in a compelling manner towards the Eastern Christian tradition, and have gained deep appreciation for its apostolic claims, its ancient theologians, its healing disciplines, its sacramental spirituality and its rich liturgical tradition. Despite my temptation to stay and fight for the Anglican way, it seems clear to me now that I must go where the Lord is directing me.

I have been an Anglican for a quarter of a century, and am grateful for all that this communion has given to me—a sense of the mystery of God’s love, awe and joy in the liturgy, a grasp of the breadth of God’s Church, its purpose in mission, and its faithfulness in witness, even in very difficult times. I owe so much to many brothers and sisters, and to special fathers (and mothers) in Christ! You are in good hands with leaders in the realignment, Bishop Duncan and others. I hope that you will not be disappointed in me, but will bless me as I do what I believe God has been drawing me to do for over a decade. God willing, we will in time find ourselves in a single faithful and united body, fulfilling the Lord’s “high priestly” prayer for us! Be assured that I will continue to pray for you in your courageous stand for the gospel and the truth. I love you all, and will miss worshiping with you and working with you on a regular basis.


The Peace of Christ be with you all,


Your sister,

Edith Humphrey

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesOrthodox Church

7 Comments
Posted May 6, 2009 at 12:31 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Finally, for those who are alienated within the Episcopal Church, the aim of the "professionally mediated discussion" has already been determined: "WCG believes that the advent of schemes such as the Communion Partners Fellowship and the Episcopal Visitors scheme instituted by the Presiding Bishop in the United States should be sufficient to provide for the care of those alienated within the Episcopal Church from recent developments."[4] (emphasis added)

According to this recommendation of the WCG, those within TEC will have two alternatives to choose from: a Communion Partners Fellowship scheme that has no details as yet beyond DEPO and mere fellowship, or an Episcopal Visitors scheme imposed by the Presiding Bishop. What is the point of gathering those alienated by TEC for a "professionally mediated conversation" when the results have already been pre-determined? Is it an opportunity for further indoctrination in the false gospel of TEC? Or institutional loyalty? Or simply an exercise designed to wear down their resistance to false teaching?

This report from the WCG is the culmination of five years of conversation, dialogue, schemes, reports, and committees that have all failed to adequately address the crisis before us. These efforts have failed in part because they have not adequately talked with or heard from those most hurt by this crisis, those persecuted orthodox Anglicans in North America. Skeptics will be forgiven for recognizing in these WCG recommendations the same processes that have failed to hold the Communion together, and the same processes of delay that TEC will take advantage of while imposing a false gospel at home and throughout the rest of the Communion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican Consultative CouncilAnglican CovenantCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts

38 Comments
Posted May 6, 2009 at 8:33 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The primate of the Anglican Church of Uganda, Henry Luke Orombi, has written a strongly-worded letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, protesting the decision by the Joint Standing Committee (JSC) not to allow an American priest who was appointed as the clerical representative of the Ugandan church to the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC) meeting here.

Archbishop Orombi called the decision “unjust, unbiblical, unconstitutional, …short of imperialistic,” and appealed to Archbishop Williams in his capacity as president of the ACC “to help the Joint Standing Committee understand the limits of their authority.”He asked Archbishop Williams to recognize the appointment of Philip Ashey, a former priest of The Episcopal Church, who is now the chief operating officer of the Anglican American Council (AAC). The AAC is part of the Common Cause Partnership, which is advocating for recognition as a separate province in North America.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Consultative CouncilAnglican ProvincesChurch of UgandaCommon Cause Partnership

7 Comments
Posted May 5, 2009 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This much is certain: American Christians would profit from taking church commitment at least as seriously as we take marital commitment. One pastor of my acquaintance includes an interesting exercise in premarital counseling. She has the couple plan each other's funeral. She finds that this makes the spouses-to-be think about what kind of person their lover may be years or decades later. And then the two start talking about how they might best take care of each other and their marriage right now. By asking how their marriage may end, they discover how it may best begin and be sustained to its end.

Something of the same quality pertains to one's marriage or commitment to a church. Maybe churches (and their ministries) really are about nothing more important than marrying and burying. Maybe marrying and burying are more closely connected than we think.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.* TheologyEcclesiology

0 Comments
Posted May 4, 2009 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A group of conservative Anglicans in Canada and the United States has finalized plans to begin forming an alternate church in North America.

Leaders of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), a collection of 12 Anglican organizations that began to unify last November, approved applications for the creation of 28 new dioceses in the church. The new church’s leaders also finalized a draft constitution and church laws ahead of its provincial assembly.

“It is a great encouragement to see the fruit of many years’ work,” said the Right Rev. Robert Duncan, archbishop-elect of the Anglican Church in North America and bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh. “Today 23 dioceses and five dioceses-in-formation joined together to reconstitute an orthodox, Biblical, missionary and united Church in North America.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts

0 Comments
Posted April 28, 2009 at 6:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Leaders representing Canadian and US orthodox Anglican jurisdictions approved applications for membership of 28 dioceses and dioceses-in-formation and finalized plans for launching the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). Twelve Anglican organizations are uniting to form the ACNA.

The ACNA Leadership Council, in addition to accepting these dioceses as constituent members, finalized a draft constitution and a comprehensive set of canons (Church bylaws) for ratification by the provincial assembly. A list of the new dioceses, the constitution and the canons will soon be available at http://www.united-anglicans.org.

“It is a great encouragement to see the fruit of many years’ work,” said the Right Reverend Robert Duncan, archbishop-elect of the Anglican Church in North America and Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh. “Today 23 dioceses and five dioceses-in-formation joined together to reconstitute an orthodox, Biblical, missionary and united Church in North America.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

13 Comments
Posted April 26, 2009 at 3:21 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Three Christian leaders, Pastor Rick Warren, Metropolitan Jonah, and the Rev. Todd Hunter have agreed to be among those addressing the organizing Assembly of the Anglican Church in North America scheduled for June 22-25 at St. Vincent’s Cathedral in Bedford, Texas.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted April 26, 2009 at 3:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But the fact the Global South is at the forefront of fuelling the North American schism is not that surprising, said Philip Harrold, a professor of Church history at the Trinity School Ministry in Pennsylvania, an Anglican seminary.

"The history of Christianity in general and Anglicanism in particular is the history of movement from one epicentre of growth and vitality to another. And the Northern Hemisphere churches by and large are in a period of decline. If you look at the Global South the contrast is remarkable. They are the ones sending missionaries out into the world, which is always a sign of health and vigor and commitment. That seems to be where the communion is going. It's part of a wider picture of Christianity in general."

Since 1910, the Christian population of Africa has grown from 10 million to 360 million today.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

0 Comments
Posted April 18, 2009 at 8:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop Duncan echoed the insistence of the Primates that theirs was not a breakaway movement. “I’m a cradle Anglican. My grandfather was a boy chorister. . . My theological views haven’t changed. The problem is that folks who have become the leadership of the Episcopal Church in the United States have pulled the rug out from under me. The person who is our Presiding Bishop, she didn’t begin as an Anglican. I did. She represents something very different. I don’t think I’m a breakaway.

“I don’t believe I have divided the Church. I believe the innovators are the ones who are dividing the Church. I love them, and I want to behave in a godly way towards them, and I will do everything I can to convince them about the truth that’s been delivered; but my focus now has to be on those who don’t know Jesus.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SchoriTEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

18 Comments
Posted April 17, 2009 at 5:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

0 Comments
Posted April 16, 2009 at 8:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A meeting in London this week of traditionalist Anglicans has dismissed attempts to accommodate orthodox believers and says that if the liberal leaders of the North American churches sign up to the proposed Anglican Covenant ‘in good conscience’, it will be meaningless.

The leaders of the Gafcon movement issued a communiqué after their meeting at a hotel near Heathrow Airport in which they gave recognition to dissident Anglicans in North America. They said: “The FCA Primates’ Council recognizes the Anglican Church in North America as genuinely Anglican and recommends that Anglican Provinces affirm full communion with the ACNA.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

31 Comments
Posted April 16, 2009 at 12:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In the name of God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

We meet in the week after Easter, rejoicing again in the power of the risen Lord Jesus to transform lives and situations. We continue to experience his active work in our lives and the lives of our churches and we rejoice in the Gospel of hope.

From its inception, the GAFCON movement has centered on the power of Christ to make all things new. We have heard this week of the great progress made in North America towards the creation of a new Province basing itself on this same biblical gospel of transformation and hope. We have also envisioned the future of the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans as a movement for defending and promoting the biblical gospel of the risen Christ.

Yet we are saddened that the present crisis in the Anglican Communion of which we are a part remains unresolved. The recent meeting of Primates in Alexandria served only to demonstrate how deep and intractable the divisions are and to encourage us to sustain the important work of GAFCON.

The GAFCON Primates’ Council has the responsibility of recognizing and authenticating orthodox Anglicans especially those who are alienated by their original Provinces. We are also called to promote the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA) in its stand against false teaching and as a rallying point for orthodoxy. It is our aim to ensure that the unity of the Anglican Communion is centered on Biblical teaching rather than mere institutional loyalty. It is essential to provide a way in which faithful Anglicans, many of whom are suffering much loss, can remain as Anglicans within the Communion while distancing themselves from false teaching.

At this meeting highly significant progress was made on the following fronts.

Read it all

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

7 Comments
Posted April 16, 2009 at 8:47 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Joining the archbishops in the three-day meeting are the Rt. Rev. Robert Duncan, Bishop of Pittsburgh in the Anglican Church of the Southern Cone and the archbishop-designate of the ACNA; the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Bishop of Fort Worth in the Anglican Church of the Southern Cone; the Rt. Rev. Charles Murphy; the leader of the Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMiA); the Rt. Rev. Martyn Minns, Bishop of the Convocation of Anglicans in North America and one of his bishops suffragan, the Rt. Rev. David Anderson; the Rt. Rev. John Guernsey, Provincial Bishop Suffragan for the Anglican Church of Uganda; the Rt. Rev. Bill Atwood, Bishop of All Saints Diocese in the Anglican Church of Kenya; and the Rt. Rev. Don Harvey, leader of the Anglican Network in Canada.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

21 Comments
Posted April 14, 2009 at 4:22 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Via email:

HERNDON, Va. (April 9, 2009) – The Convocation of Anglicans in North America announced that five congregations from five different states have joined the orthodox Anglican organization.

The new CANA members are as follows: Coventry, Alabaster, Ala.; Christ Church, Baltimore, Md.; St. Stephens, Tullahoma, Tenn.; Holy Trinity, North Augusta, S.C., and St. Edmunds, Elm Grove, Wis.

“We are pleased to welcome these new congregations into the CANA fellowship, a body of orthodox Anglican Christians here in the U.S. This is an exciting time to be Anglican given the renewed enthusiasm in this country and around the world. CANA provides an authentic connection to the worldwide Anglican Communion, which is what many Christians are seeking. We pray that each of these new congregations will grow in the fullness of our Lord Jesus Christ and continue to see lives transformed by the Good News of the Gospel,” said CANA Missionary Bishop Martyn Minns.

With the addition of these congregations, CANA now includes 75 congregations across the U.S.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCANACommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Departing Parishes

3 Comments
Posted April 9, 2009 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The charge to the Governance Task Force was to provide a strong skeleton around which a living Church could be built.

This letter is being sent to the whole Church as an introduction to the basic work that has been done, and in order to outline the process of discussion, adoption and ratification now ahead of us. Simply put, the whole Church discusses, the Provincial Council adopts, and the Provincial Assembly ratifies or sends back.

The principal time for suggesting changes to the draft canons is between now and the April meeting of Council. Comments and suggestions should be given to the jurisdictional representatives who compose the Common Cause Leadership Council by April 24th or sent to the chair of the Governance Task Force, Mr. Hugo Blankingship (email: governance [at] theacna [dot] org), no later than noon on Monday, April 20th. The Council can then consider these matters in deciding the form in which the canons are adopted. Once adopted, another period of publication and comment follows, but this time the advice from the local Church to its representatives to the Provincial Assembly (June 22-25) would take the form of recommendations on whether to ratify or reject individual canons or sections of canons. If, however, substantial concerns are identified in this latter period, it should be noted that it would be possible for the Council to meet, adopt and circulate further revised canons prior to the Provincial Assembly.

Read it carefully and read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

58 Comments
Posted April 6, 2009 at 6:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At least eight conservative congregations in Western Washington — including two that left the Episcopal Church — are forming a new Anglican diocese in the Northwest.

The Cascadia Diocese, as it's being called, is the latest local example of the deep divisions splitting the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion over issues such as Scriptural authority and church teachings. The differences erupted in 2003 when the Episcopal Church confirmed the election of an openly gay bishop in New Hampshire.

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Departing Parishes

3 Comments
Posted April 4, 2009 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Here are some initial thoughts about recovering a better understanding and application of the Bishop's role in our midst....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

3 Comments
Posted April 2, 2009 at 5:09 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

1 Comments
Posted April 2, 2009 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Chuck Lambert is helping to plant seeds to grow more Anglican churches in the United States and Canada.

The Lapeer resident is a member and business manager for St. Matthew's Anglican Church in Lapeer at 1009 N. Saginaw. "We're in the process of setting up a new Anglican church in North America," he said. "We want to get back to Christian ideals. We hope to plant new churches by increasing the number of members we have. We're planting seeds for churches all over."

The religion has deep roots that date back to the 1600s, as it split from England Anglicans and the Episcopal church due to theological differences. Lambert said people are becoming more receptive to the Anglican religion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

0 Comments
Posted March 28, 2009 at 4:22 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

(Via email):

San Jose is now home to the new St. James Anglican Church. All are invited to celebrate the establishment of this community of faith. Sunday services will include a traditional mass at 9 am, and a contemporary service at 10:45 am.

St. James will be meeting at the Camden Community Center at 3369 Union Ave, San Jose, CA 95124. St. James has joined the newly-formed Anglican Church of North America, which unites 700 orthodox Anglican congregations, representing roughly 100,000 people in the United States and Canada.

The initial launch team for St. James has been drawn from the former leadership of St. Edward’s Episcopal Church. Fr. Ed McNeill, who led St. Edward’s for 10 years, is St. James Anglican Church’s first pastor. Six of the twelve members of St. Edward’s Vestry have left to help found St. James.

The decision of Fr. McNeill and other church leaders to found St. James Anglican Church marks the end of years of debate within St. Edward’s about supporting the efforts of The Episcopal Church USA. While members of the Episcopal Church have always welcomed a diversity of opinion, recent theological innovations by the national leadership have made it impossible for many orthodox Christians to remain.

The Episcopal Church has increasingly adopted policies that are unacceptable to orthodox Christians, departing from the primacy of Scripture. Church leaders have taken positions that undermine traditional teaching on the Divinity of Christ, Jesus’ resurrection and His role in salvation, Biblical standards on sexuality, and many of the tenets expressed in the Nicene Creed. These changes aligned the church with today’s social trends, and led the church away from its historic mission. The result has been declining attendance, declining ordinations and the departure of many clergy members, strained relationship with the global Anglican Communion, and nationwide lawsuits.

Fr. McNeill said, “We are very happy that the time of divisiveness has passed, and that healing can begin. We will miss our friends who have chosen to remain in the Episcopal Church and are committed to praying for them. We look forward to serving in the Bay Area as Anglican Christians.”

A website has been established at http://www.newanglicanchurch.com, to provide a means for community-building among Anglicans in the Bay Area. Those who have left the Episcopal Church, or who have been searching for Orthodox churches in the Bay Area, will have access to news and information, as well as an opportunity to communicate with others.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts

16 Comments
Posted March 26, 2009 at 7:20 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bishop [Robert] Duncan is Archbishop-designate of the ACNA and Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh that is now under the auspices of the Anglican Church of the Southern Cone. The Rev. J. Philip Ashey, chief operating officer and chaplain for the American Anglican Council, told The Living Church that Pittsburgh is one of the five applications for recognition as an ACNA diocese that have already been received. The deadline for applications is April 15.

Earlier this month, the Rt. Rev. John H. Chapman, Bishop of Ottawa in the Anglican Church of Canada, said he would authorize a congregation under his oversight to begin performing same-sex blessings in part because “while our church struggles to honor the call for gracious restraint in blessing same-sex unions, those who are proponents of cross-border interventions have and continue to show no restraint.”

That view was echoed this week during the House of Bishops’ spring retreat by Bishop Dan Edwards of Nevada. Bishop Edwards posted a blog entry noting that a number of bishops are considering the repeal of Resolution B033 because of what they perceive as a lack of reciprocal restraint by the ACNA.

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: PittsburghSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

20 Comments
Posted March 22, 2009 at 2:48 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Standing Committee of the Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion) has resolved unanimously to be “in abiding and full communion” with the emerging Anglican Church in North America. The Church of Nigeria, which counts more than a quarter of the world’s Anglican Christians as members, is the first Anglican province to formally accept the Anglican Church in North America as its North American partner within the Anglican Communion.

In making their decision, the leaders of the Church of Nigeria’s more than 140 dioceses also recommended that their province send a delegation to the Anglican Church in North America’s inaugural Provincial Assembly, to be held June 22-25 in Bedford, TX, “to demonstrate our enduring partnership in the Gospel of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of NigeriaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

23 Comments
Posted March 20, 2009 at 5:40 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Leaving the Episcopal denomination (while remaining in the Anglican Communion) has given Mr. [John] Yates the freedom to plant churches in urban areas amid many Episcopal churches. (One is next door to Christ the King.) His goal is to plant 20 churches in northern Virginia before retiring. Christ the King was the third, and a fourth was recently planted in Arlington. Mr. Kurcina, 33, who is my son-in-law, is preparing to plant a fifth in Fairfax County.

For a growing number of young preachers like Christ the King's Mr. [David] Glade, planting and then leading a new church is an ideal option. As orthodox Anglicans, they didn't feel welcome in the Episcopal church. And they felt a strong calling to lead their own parish. Mr. Glade grew up as an Episcopalian in Jacksonville, Fla. After graduation from Florida State, he came to The Falls Church as an intern and spent four years as a youth leader before attending Trinity Seminary outside Pittsburgh. He returned to The Falls Church eager to lead a theologically conservative Anglican congregation. "In order to do that, you had to go out and do it yourself," he told me.

"Every new church has an awkward phase, figuring out who they are and getting to know each other," Mr. Glade says. That phase is over. Christ the King has also become financially self-sufficient. It aims to be a "healthy church," like its parent. "A healthy church reproduces itself," Mr. Glade says. Christ the King may soon do just that. Its assistant rector wants to plant his own church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCANACommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Virginia* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryEvangelism and Church Growth* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesEvangelicals

1 Comments
Posted March 20, 2009 at 6:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Since the ANiC was launched in November 2007 with two small churches, two priests, and two bishops, we have grown to comprise 73 priests and dea­cons, three bishops, and 28 parishes, with a total average Sunday attendance of 3500. That initial growth has come from Canadian Anglicans who have felt conscience-bound to align with a biblically faithful Church, while still retaining their full Anglican identity. In recent years, tens of thousands have left the Anglican Church of Canada — and Anglicanism. The ANiC now provides an option for those who wish to remain Anglican. Our prayer and aim is that our future growth will come primarily from reaching out to the millions of unchurched Canadians through evangelism, church-planting, and discipleship.

Unfortunately, we are currently dealing with unnecessary and costly distractions because of litigation over church property. Despite our re­peated requests to seek mutually ad­van­tageous settlements through nego­tia­tion or mediation, four Angli­can Church of Canada dioceses — New Westminster, British Columbia, Niagara, and Huron — have forced ANiC parishes into court. The Primates’ recent commu­niqué calling for gracious restraint and mediation gave us hope (News, 13 February), but so far the Anglican Church of Canada has insisted on pursuing disputes in the secular court system.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues

0 Comments
Posted March 20, 2009 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

After a long and fruitless search for an opportunity to continue active ministry within The Episcopal Church, the Rt. Rev. David C. Bane, Bishop of Southern Virginia from 1998-2006, has “joyfully and gratefully” accepted an invitation from Archbishop Gregory Venables to be received as a bishop in the Anglican Province of the Southern Cone. He will serve in the Anglican Church of North America as an assisting bishop in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Long-simmering divisions in the Diocese of Southern Virginia culminated in Bishop Bane’s decision to resign in 2006. In a March 9 letter to Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Bishop Bane said he believed that his “remaining as bishop would prevent the diocese from healing and moving forward as so much of the blame and animosity continued to be focused on me personally.” He said his decision to resign also was predicated on assurances that there would still be opportunities for him to exercise his vocation within The Episcopal Church. The Living Church received a copy of Bishop Bane’s letter.

Before he and his wife, Alice, relocated to the Diocese of East Carolina and joined an Episcopal parish near their new residence, Bishop Bane said he contacted that diocese’s bishop, the Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel. He said he had to contact Bishop Daniel three times before he was able to arrange a meeting and that since then, Bishop Daniel has initiated no contact, nor has he returned his phone calls or letters. Bishop Daniel also has refused to include him on the clergy mailing list. Bishop Bane said he learned second hand that Bishop Daniel had intervened to remove his name from consideration as an interim at a nearby parish.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC Conflicts

16 Comments
Posted March 13, 2009 at 7:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

To me, the turning point in Canada came at General Synod two years ago in Winnipeg when a motion was passed that indicated that same sex blessings are not in conflict with the core creedal doctrines of the Anglican Church of Canada. When that was passed, for me it was game over – as far as being able to stay in the Anglican Church of Canada was concerned.

The Anglican Church of Canada has now made up its mind, has now decided what its theology is going to be and all they are hanging back on is timing. When will be the best time to do this with the least fallout? At the end of the synod, it was agreed that they would spend an extra three years studying this, with no diocese taking action. Despite this talk of restraint, since that time, six separate dioceses have voted to ask their bishop for permission to proceed with same sex blessings.

And two weeks ago the Diocese of Toronto, with its four bishops, decided they were going to authorize certain parishes within the diocese to perform same sex blessings without taking it to synod at all. They rationalized that, since it was only going to be allowed in a small number of parishes, there was no real harm in it. This sort of reasoning makes no sense at all.

This past year, we have gone through a series of struggles on both sides of the border. Bishop Bob Duncan of Pittsburgh has been a great champion in the United States as have a number of other diocesan bishops. And they have been a great help to us, because it is very difficult to stand alone. Together with them we are planning to see if we can form a new province in North America.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

2 Comments
Posted March 13, 2009 at 5:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But on what basis do they make their objection? On procedure? That's a tough sell for a movement willing to violate ecclesiastical procedures in setting up their alternative province.

Luther based his Reformation on Scripture. Here, once again, the schismatics fall short. Jesus himself said nothing whatsoever about homosexuality, although he did affirm the religious laws set out in the book of Leviticus. But if that is the redoubt for the conservatives, they would be obliged to observe and enforce the other Levitical proscriptions as well – beginning, I suppose, with the fabric content of the purple shirts they're wearing! One of the Levitical proscriptions warns against wearing garments of mixed fabric.

If the conservatives truly wanted to "prooftext" their case against Gene Robinson, they should quote Titus 1:6, where St. Paul mandated that church leaders should be "the husband of one wife." Gene Robinson, a divorced man, presumably would not qualify (nor would some other bishops). Jesus, after all, said nothing explicit about homosexuality; he did, however, have something to say about divorce -- and none of it good.

Having struck out with both procedure and Scripture, the schismatics are left only with tradition.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

23 Comments
Posted February 22, 2009 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Data

27 Comments
Posted February 17, 2009 at 6:18 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In respect to this issue, a final comment is in order. If the Communion makes provision for individual dioceses to ratify the Covenant, it will prove easier for that to happen in TEC than in many other churches of the Anglican Communion. It will be easier because of the unique character of TEC’s constitution. TEC’s constitution makes no provision for a metropolitan bishop, givens no real authority either to its Presiding Bishop or its General Convention to impose its will on a diocese; and I am convinced it allows for a diocese to remove itself from TEC. If provision were to be made for ratification at the level of a diocese, individual dioceses within TEC would have a degree of freedom in this respect that dioceses in many other provinces would not.

So now we come to the question, “What then shall we do?” For many in TEC a covenant with any real consequences is out of the question. It is likely that they will answer the question “What then shall we do” by refusing to ratify the covenant and forming an alliance with other provinces of like mind. In all likelihood they will continue to claim membership in the Anglican Communion, seeking from within their diminished status, as they are want to say, “the greatest degree of communion possible.” It may well be, however, that in forming such an alliance, they in fact end up by creating another communion altogether. In any case, the forces at play in these circumstances will be centrifugal rather than centripetal.

For others of a more confessional frame of mind a covenant may be a part of their future, but, at present, they are skeptical that the final draft will have sufficiently clear commitments to shared doctrine and practice. For those who have cast their lot with ACNA, their future in relation to a covenant is at best uncertain. At present, only provinces can ratify the covenant. It is unlikely that ACNA will realize its goal of provincial status in the near future. Further, should there be an arrangement for individual dioceses to ratify, there are only three, perhaps four, dioceses now a part of the ACNA group. They might be given access to ratification, though that is doubtful. Even, however, if they were allowed to ratify the covenant as individual dioceses, the majority of ACNA’s membership would not be so allowed because it is unlikely that they would be able to establish diocesan status.

For my own part, these first two options appear fraught with difficulty. I believe that the present proposal of the Covenant Design Group, even though it is surrounded by questions, provides the best way forward for Anglicans if they wish to maintain both communion and catholic identity.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantAnglican IdentityCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* TheologyEcclesiology

31 Comments
Posted February 11, 2009 at 12:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The primates’ letter had received the unanimous endorsement of the primates, Archbishop Williams said. However, the WCG’s communication was a report prepared by a committee appointed by Archbishop Williams and presented by him to the primates as a resource document; it was not submitted to a vote. Many parts of the communiqué refer to passages from the 17-page WCG report. Other sections of the communiqué refer to the document on gracious restraint. The sections mentioned in the communiqué indicate broader support among the primates.

This communiqué, perhaps to a more significant degree than others in recent years, attempts to look to doctrine rather than legislation or political solutions. The primates pick up a theme from the Windsor Report, which questioned whether the Communion suffered from an “ecclesial deficit, in other words, do we have the necessary theological structural and cultural foundations to sustain the life of the Communion? We need to address divisive issues in a timely and effective way, and to learn the responsibilities and obligations of interdependence.”

The Episcopal Church and the proposed Anglican Church of North America both received support, as well as pointed but fair questions about their conduct and objectives. For instance, The Episcopal Church was praised for its efforts to date to exercise “gracious restraint” in not consecrating any additional openly gay bishops. The proponents of the proposed new parallel province in North America were reassured that they were Anglican, and that they were deserving of some measure of protection from legal attacks, at least in the short term.

Read the whole thing.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesInstruments of UnitySexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessingsWindsor Report / Process

6 Comments
Posted February 10, 2009 at 9:12 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I was asked at a dinner party why I had not made a comment about the new ‘Anglican’ province being formed in North America and claiming 100,000 members. I really don’t have anything to add to what I have already said. The Archbishop of Canterbury has met, eaten and prayed with some of the leading schismatics and appears to be open to the process of this new province seeking recognition through formal channels. Martyn Minns, the Nigerian bishop, originally from Nottingham, England, now residing in New Jersey, has made some comments to the effect that the new province really doesn’t need to operate according to the rules of an English charity (under which the Anglican Consultative Council operates), and suggests that the Archbishop of Canterbury would ‘clarify’ things for Anglicans if he would get behind this innovation. I’m tired of it all and continue to suspect that The Episcopal Church will continue to be marginalized, --or at least those parts of the church that are willing to move beyond tolerance of GLBT people to affirmation.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

6 Comments
Posted February 9, 2009 at 7:57 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Robert] Duncan made no mention of the primates' call for mediated talks in his official statement responding to the February 5 communiqué issued after the leaders or primates of the Anglican Communion's 38 provinces ended their five day meeting in Alexandria, Egypt. Instead, in that statement, he portrayed the members of the proposed new "Anglican Church in North America" as people "who are attempting to remain faithful amidst vast pressures to acquiesce to beliefs and practices far outside of the Christian and Anglican mainstream."

[Bonnie] Anderson told ENS that "the primates spoke in a new voice in their communiqué." Anderson, who plans to issue a full statement next week, went on to say that "while I didn't agree with everything they said, I appreciated their emphasis on relationships and their commitment to mission. The Windsor Continuation Group is another matter. They seem firmly anchored in the past, yearning for a centralized authority that can solve all of our problems. This is troubling, because centralization disenfranchises the laity, and diminishes the importance of the witness of the local church."

In their communiqué, the primates called for the development of a "pastoral council" and Williams' ability to appoint of "pastoral visitors" to assist in healing and reconciliation given the current "situation of tension" in the Anglican Communion. They also encouraged all parties in the current controversies to maintain "gracious restraint" with respect to actions that could exacerbate the tensions, such as same-gender blessings, cross-border interventions and the ordination of gay and lesbian people to the episcopate.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Polity & CanonsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

5 Comments
Posted February 8, 2009 at 2:37 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This week, at their meeting in Alexandria, the primates have been debating the Covenant, a new document that is at the heart of the solution and sets out a Bible-based orthodoxy that the provinces will be invited to sign up to. Some provinces may well refuse to do so. These include Canada, where one diocese, New Westminster, has already authorised same-sex blessings, and another, Toronto, is expected to follow suit within a year.

The Episcopal Church of the US might also have difficulty giving full support to a document that does not do full justice to the ministry of clerics such as Bishop Robinson, now an establishment figure who is friendly with President Obama — he prayed the invocation at the start of the inauguration celebrations last month.

The result will be not schism but a two-tier communion, with all provinces in communion with the “mother church” in England and its primate, Dr Rowan Williams, primus inter pares or first among equals, but some having a lesser status and not being in full communion with each other.

At the same time the new “church” formed by conservative evangelicals in the US, led by the deposed Bishop of Pittsburgh, Bob Duncan, which is seeking recognition as a new province, is likely to be granted some extra-provincial status allowing the thousands of Anglicans it represents to remain within the Communion. This would lead to two parallel Anglican provinces operating in the US, one free to pursue its mission of inclusivity including the consecration of bishops of different sexualities, the other mandated to preach its own gospel of what it believes to be “orthodoxy”.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantAnglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Anglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesInstruments of UnitySexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessingsWindsor Report / Process* TheologyEcclesiology

16 Comments
Posted February 8, 2009 at 7:23 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

i have been getting a bunch of emails from people who haven't seen this or who can't find it. Please take the time to read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Anglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

2 Comments
Posted February 7, 2009 at 5:33 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There is honesty in the written Communiqué concerning “our damaged and fractured relationships,” and recognition that the fabric has been torn. There is yearning for “accountability,” even “robust accountability.” Those of us in the Common Cause Partnership who live face to face with the stark realities of unjust depositions, lawsuits, and forced evictions from church buildings and homes are acutely aware of the need for resolution. We are committed to help the process however we can. We are aware, however, that the innovations, punitive lawsuits, and abuses of the Episcopal Church continue to take a toll. They proceed unrepentant and undeterred. We of the Common Cause Partnership and the emerging Anglican Church in North America will do our part for the good of the Anglican family we value so much.

The vision of a biblical, missionary and united Anglicanism in North America – indeed in all the world – is undiminished among those who bear the vision. The coming together of the Common Cause Partnership into the Anglican Church in North America will proceed. Our commitment to our missionary partners all around the world will continue. Already larger than twelve Provinces of the Anglican Communion, we will work together in koinonia with all who are willing to work with us....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

3 Comments
Posted February 7, 2009 at 11:31 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Citing allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct, an Anglican bishop has suspended the lead minister of a year-old church that broke off from the national Episcopal Church, officials said Monday.

The Rev. Lorne Coyle, of Christ Church of Vero Beach, was suspended effective 2 p.m. Sunday because his bishop received an out-of-state woman’s allegations that she and Coyle, who is married, had an affair, said the church’s senior warden, Jim Reamy III.

The bishop, from Virginia, met with Coyle last week in Vero Beach to inform him of the accusation.

On Sunday, Coyle stood in front of the 400-member congregation and confirmed he had sexual relations with an adult women over a period of years, Reamy said. Coyle left the building before the recessional hymn.

Very sad. Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

12 Comments
Posted February 3, 2009 at 8:37 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Charlie Masters, general secretary of Duncan's new church and its spokesperson in Canada, says the intention of setting up the Anglican Church in North America was to offer an alternative entity operating parallel to the established churches of Canada and the United States.

Breaking away was the first step. Being recognized as a province in the communion is the next. "We have organized ourselves as an Anglican province and are operating as a province," says the soft-spoken Masters, who is also executive archdeacon of the Anglican Network in Canada.

The primates attending this week's five-day meeting will be told about the constitution and canons of the new church in hopes they will support it being made the communion's 39th province, with Duncan as primate. (Duncan could not be reached for comment.)

Masters believes the new church can bring unity to the communion. By providing a theological alternative to the liberal Canadian and American churches, he says, conservative Anglicans will no longer feel the need to break away.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesPrimates Meeting Alexandria Egypt, February 2009Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

3 Comments
Posted February 1, 2009 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Conservative Anglicans say they do not expect their new North American church to receive official approval from Anglican archbishops who will convene next week (Feb. 1-5) in Alexandria, Egypt.

"We do expect that our situation will be discussed," said the Rev.
Peter Frank, a spokesman for the newly established Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). "At the same time, it would be very surprising if there was some kind of quick, game-changing action."

After years of disagreeing with the liberal majorities in the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada, conservatives broke off and formed a rival church last December. Conservatives hope the fledgling province will ultimately be recognized as the official Anglican franchise in North America.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

7 Comments
Posted January 30, 2009 at 5:31 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Members of All Souls Anglican Church had to walk away from their home in 2007, after the Episcopal Diocese said they could no longer worship there.

Now the diocese is walking away from the empty 5.3-acre All Souls campus in Mandarin, putting it up for sale for $2.8 million. But the former occupants say "no thanks" to coming back as they hone in on a new, permanent home nearby.

Meeting every Sunday since mid-July 2007 in the Mandarin Middle School auditorium, the congregation uses a storefront at 3750 San Jose Place for office space and a local Baptist church for youth programs. That could change in the next year as the church looks into the purchase of a 5-acre site on Hood Road, said the Rev. Gene Strickland.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: FloridaTEC Departing Parishes

20 Comments
Posted January 27, 2009 at 9:23 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The path taken by Epiphany's tiny congregation mirrors that of the Episcopal church at large over the last few years –– splintering, adapting and reinventing itself. "It's like a Reformation. Many have left at great cost, leaving buildings, incomes and pensions," says congregant Leslie Frye, wife of Canon Ralph Frye.

Their reasons are to maintain a closer adherence to the Scriptures than the established Episcopal church.

"It's difficult when higher-ups are not hewing to the Bible," says Leslie Hanna, one of Epiphany's original members.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry

5 Comments
Posted January 27, 2009 at 7:10 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The process for applying to be recognized as a diocese, cluster or network of the Anglican Church in North America is now available.

Recognized dioceses, clusters and networks will be able to fully participate in the inaugural convention of the Anglican Church in North this June in Bedford, Texas.

In many cases, existing groups of churches, already organized and under the authority of a bishop, will apply for recognition. Those forming new groups will need to begin the process of organizing themselves, selecting leadership and building a common life.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Communion NetworkCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

6 Comments
Posted January 25, 2009 at 5:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Some Anglo-Catholics might be uneasy with the predominance of evangelicals among those seeking a third North American province of the Anglican Communion. But the leadership of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth has thrown its support behind the movement in part because of assurances that there will be no women bishops, according to the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Bishop of Fort Worth.

“Though we have our continuing differences over the issue of the ordination of women, Bishop Duncan and the [Common Cause Partnership] lead bishops have given assurances that there will be no women bishops in the new province and that the historic, traditional theological position on this matter will be protected, respected and welcomed,” Bishop Iker said.

“Anglo-Catholics, while grateful for this attitude, have called for a thorough theological and biblical study of the issue of the ordination of women as a top priority in the new province,” Bishop Iker said. “It must give due consideration to the reality that the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church, which together comprise over 80 percent of the world’s Christians, have already spoken on this issue and that unilateral actions on our part have already seriously damaged ecumenical relations for the future. Are we willing to submit to the mind of the whole church? Are we really committed to abiding by common consent as determined by general councils?”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

53 Comments
Posted January 21, 2009 at 5:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We do not know how the proposal for a new province will be received nor are we entirely clear what its proponents are proposing; that is probably unavoidable given the hardships all around. We understand that many see the situation as demanding this option. For our part, we accept the promise of those associated with this movement that they will honor our own commitments. Communion Partners will pray for the Common Cause proponents and will assume that promise of cooperation entails a charitable acceptance that another way forward is to be honored and that we can move forward on parallel tracks and not ‘recruit’ from each others’ daily purpose, honoring the jurisdictional integrities of respective bishops. God will be in charge of the next season, as He has always been.

When the Primates meet in February we anticipate that our separate ways of moving forward will be acknowledged and honored. We pledge our prayers for all involved and ask God’s blessing on all of us in a very difficult time. With gratitude for his grace and mercy, again this 2009 Epiphany we remain, yours in Christ, on behalf of Communion Partners,

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsInstruments of UnityWindsor Report / Process

41 Comments
Posted January 19, 2009 at 5:04 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rt. Rev. Robert Duncan, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh (Anglican), is involved in “an unanticipated series of consultations with the primates who originated the call” for a new Anglican province in North America, participants in an Anglican theology conference have been told.

Bishop Duncan had been scheduled to address “North American Anglicanism After GAFCON and Lambeth” at the Mere Anglicanism conference in Charleston, S.C. Instead, the Very Rev. William McKeachie, dean of the Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul which is the conference location, read a letter from Bishop Duncan. He said that following consultations about the proposed new province between Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and members of the GAFCON primates’ steering committee in London last month, Archbishop Williams had asked that a paper be prepared setting out the situation and the hopes for a new structure. The Archbishop invited the primates to forward the case to the Anglican Consultative Council along with their comments.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

17 Comments
Posted January 16, 2009 at 5:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There is now a more detailed schedule available via this parish newsletter on page 2.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Latest NewsAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of TanzaniaChurch of NigeriaCommon Cause PartnershipEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Bishops* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesBaptistsOther FaithsIslamSecularism* South Carolina* Theology

4 Comments
Posted January 13, 2009 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

5. GLOBAL CONCERNS

a. As a result of a presentation of a mission survey in the Sudan we were humbled by the remarkable faith of the bishops, clergy and congregations in a country that has been devastated by war for more than two decades. We embraced the Primate’s call for a continuing Sudan Mission Initiative and as initial steps appointed the Dean, Archbishop Maxwell Anikwenwa, as the interim Sudan Mission Coordinator to work with the leadership of the Church of the Sudan so that we might discern together the next steps for this partnership. We resolved to continue the work of the Church of Nigeria Mission Society locally and in the francophone countries of West Africa including Benin Republic, Cote d’Ivore, Chad, Niger, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Mali and Togo and individual dioceses are urged to take an active role in specific projects.

b. Following the Primate’ report on the meeting of the GAFCON Primates Council with the Archbishop of Canterbury, the House of Bishops, while expressing support for this effort to build bridges, stressed that in any effort to bring restoration to the Communion there can be no compromise on the need for genuine repentance by those who have walked away from the ‘faith once delivered to the saints’. We are, however, delighted by the continuing fruit of GAFCON, the developing Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans around the world, the work of the GAFCON Primates Council and the emerging Anglican Church in North America.

Read it carefully and read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of NigeriaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008* International News & CommentaryAfricaSudanMiddle East

2 Comments
Posted January 11, 2009 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Central Florida Bishop John] Howe has told me that he would not be part of any group that is cut off from the Archbishop of Canterbury, the main symbol of unity in the Anglican Communion. In an interview with his diocese's newspaper recently, Howe said, "I share many if not most of (the dissenters') theological commitments and concerns. ... But God has called me to be a bishop in The Episcopal Church ... and I have no intention of leaving it."

All this may seem like a lot of to-do about technicalities, but there is an important principle at stake in these disputes, and that is the nature of the church. The dissidents - those who are going - believe they are upholding its purity. The ones who are staying believe they are upholding its unity. Which is the more important?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Central Florida* TheologyEcclesiology

39 Comments
Posted January 10, 2009 at 7:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

What the Constitution does provide, not yet articulated in the draft Covenant, is a final mechanism – along with a provincial tribunal to deal with disputes over the interpretation and application of the Constitution and future provincial canons – by which to establish a decision regarding membership “removal”. It does not, of course, say anything about the circumstances under which such a final vote for removal would be taken, or about the procedures leading up to such a vote, precisely the knotted issue being debated with respect to the Covenant. Presumably the yet-to-be-formulated canons of the Province would speak to this issue, but as yet there is no indication of how to sort out this challenge. For the moment, then, the proposed province is leaving this procedure undefined, although its purpose, once defined, can go no further than the Covenant’s current proposal for the Communion as a whole, as I have just indicated. Indeed, one wonders if there is a good deal of faith being placed on the stability of incoming commitments held by the proposed Province’s new members. But there is a parallel to this with the Covenant’s purpose to lay out its own commitments up front with sufficient (though realistic) concreteness as to sift the actual willingness of churches to embrace its common life.

In summary, the shape of the proposed province’s Constitution demonstrates some fundamental convergences, deliberate or not, with the direction being taken by the draft Communion Covenant. This fact is important. For given the explicit support offered to the proposed province by leaders who chose not to attend the Lambeth Conference, we might conclude that the Covenant’s direction is indeed coherent with their own desires. The Constitution, that has been formulated freely and with every permission to state a desired set of commitments without impediment, has turned out in key respects to be very close to the Covenant’s own current thrust for Communion relationships. Where it demonstrates confusions, as it does, they are generally ones inherent in the process of seeking common accountabilities across lines where individual churches still clearly wish to guard their own autonomy. The Covenant Design Group will want to take this seriously into account as we proceed further and continue to learn from the responses of the Communion at large. As part of this work, the proposed Constitution represents a very significant response of its own.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

1 Comments
Posted January 8, 2009 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But in July of 2003, the Episcopal Church, including Colorado’s bishop, Jerry Winterrowd, knowingly and happily elected to consecrate as bishop an openly homosexual priest living in a same-sex relationship.

At this point, the Episcopal Church in America—which, frankly, had been crumbling—was broken.

It had been under stress for two reasons: the gradual crackup of the authority of Scripture (and hence the Lord of the Scriptures) and the role of bishops. In our tradition and polity, the Scriptures are the lifeblood of the church, and bishops are the foundation extending from the cornerstone, Jesus Christ. Episcopal bishops exercise spiritual authority because of a godly life and their commitment to perpetuate, guard, and defend the Biblical faith.

The role of bishop—one who “guard[s] the faith,” obedient to the Lord in the Scriptures and the power of the Holy Spirit—is foundational to Anglican identity.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of RwandaCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Colorado

0 Comments
Posted January 7, 2009 at 8:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The angel in The Gospel According to St. Luke explains it this way: “To you is born this day in the City of David, a savior who is Christ the Lord.” Jesus comes to save us. One way we can understand that saving transaction is to say that Jesus comes to take our place. He comes to trade places. He comes to trade identities and to trade futures. We could also say that he comes to trade parents and children and relationships and health and circumstances and resources and preferments, yes, and even investments. He trades his royal robes for swaddling bands. He takes our place and offers us His.

He begins in poverty in a stable, in homelessness in Bethlehem and in exile in Egypt. He takes on our flesh and our struggle. He takes on our infirmities and our death, that we might be whole and freed. He offers us his place, His Father, His Spirit, His life, His future.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Pittsburgh* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsChristmasParish MinistryPreaching / Homiletics

3 Comments
Posted January 7, 2009 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

"I think a lot of people including myself see it as a tragedy that the Anglican community seems so split, and my heart aches having been there immediately following 2003 — I know what some of these congregations are going through," said the Rev. Cynthia Baskin, a rector at St. Francis Episcopal Church in Potomac. St. Francis was affected by the rift in 2003 after Gene Robinson, the gay bishop in New Hampshire, was consecrated. The discussions that followed about the roles of gays and lesbians in the church lead to the departure of about 50 individuals from the church of about 400. "There's a lot of grief and a lot of loss and it's just very difficult, like watching someone in the hospital."

While Baskin said St. Francis is more unified after the members' departure, she said a poll of her congregants would most likely find viewpoints on the role of homosexuals in the church all over the map. The difference, she said, was that some Episcopalians use the issue as a "litmus test for faithfulness."

"I wouldn't go so far as to say [the individuals who left the church] didn't want to include or reach out in some kind of way to someone who was homosexual," Baskin said. "At the same time, they felt very strongly that homosexuality is not the way God intended human being to be, and they drew a line there, and found it difficult to be part of a community that honored homosexuals and allowed for their inclusion."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

8 Comments
Posted January 6, 2009 at 4:57 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

From here:

I have just been informed that the Vicar of St. John's Mission Church in Clearwater has announced that he and most of the communicants of St. John's have left The Episcopal Church. This comes as a complete surprise to me. Although Fr. Hartley has shared his frustrations with me, he never indicated to me that he was on the verge of taking such a step, and I am extraordinarily disappointed not only in their decision, but that he went public with this announcement without informing me first. It is also a shock to me that he would lead this congregation away from the Church without providing me with the time and opportunity to be in conversation with them as part of their decision-making process--after all, as Bishop I am--or was--their chief priest and pastor. I not only ordained Fr. Hartley to the priesthood, but I am the one who appointed him Vicar of St. John's, providing him with an Altar and a pulpit.

Any division in the Church weakens the Church's mission. And when people leave they not only deprive those with different views of their voice, but they also deprive themselves of prayerful viewpoints which they need to consider. The Episcopal Church--indeed, traditional Anglicanism--respects highly the individual intellect and conscience, and I respect the decisions of Fr. Hartley and others at St. John's as a decision of conscience. Nevertheless, it breaks my heart.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Departing Parishes

12 Comments
Posted January 6, 2009 at 6:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

These convictions and commitments are reflected in patient and enduring witness rather than in strategies and tactics designed to bring about desired future states. They grow from trust that God will use faithful witness in his own time and in his own way to bring about his purposes—purposes that do not stem from our imaginings or our desires but from God’s justice and God’s mercy.

Just what are these convictions and commitments? Here we must summarize a host of conversations to which we have been party over the past several years. The convictions revealed are these.

1. The weakness and disarray of TEC (and indeed of the churches of the West) are best understood as the result of divine displeasure at pervasive misconstruals of Christian belief and practice coupled with a common life that blows neither “hot nor cold.”
2. It is a form of delusion and disobedience to place oneself and ones friends outside the judgment God intends for the health of his church. Rather, fidelity calls for acceptance of the judgment as both just and merciful. It calls also for faithful Christians to live through that judgment to the end. This way is none other than the way Christ himself walked, believing not in a future state of his devising and constructing but in God’s power, through his death, to give life to the dry bones of his people.
3. The pattern of Christ’s life suggests the necessity of a clear differentiation between a way faithful to his life and teaching and one that has simply assumed the form of the culture with which the leadership of TEC has identified.
4. The obedient form of differentiation suggested by the pattern of Christ is not separation but faithful persistence along a different path within the fellowship of the church that has nurtured one as a Christian but has, nonetheless, gone astray.


Read it all.

Update: Sarah Hey has a lengthy response to this here which concludes this way:

Let's be clear. There are Episcopalians who are most interested in the "inside strategy." The fact that the ACI and I assume the Communion Partners group eschews the "inside strategy" does not mean that those Episcopalians do not exist.

On the other hand, it is good to see the ACI and the Communion Partners continue to clarify their goals publicly. Their expressed goals do not make them "bad organizations." Their goals merely express who they are and what they intend to do -- and it's important for clergy who are making decisions about participation in either organization to be aware of what those organizations mean to do. There are some good people in both organizations and, from the perspective of this layperson, the Communion Partners is currently the only place that an inside strategy clergyperson can gain some fellowship.

In the same way, we all know what the new Anglican entity -- the ACNA -- is clearly seeking. Those who leave for the ACNA have obviously abandoned any "inside strategy" as well.

At this point, those Episcopalians interested in the inside strategy need to connect with one another, and seek counsel where they can -- but with crystal clarity that there is no organizational or institutional or national help for them. We are, as I have said for the past almost two years, on our own. Acknowledging that fact is the first step towards clarity and healing and seeking help where we can find it, with those who share our goals -- and of course, fellowshiping with joy with all orthodox Anglican brothers and sisters, whether in the ACI, the Communion Partners, or the ACNA.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican IdentityCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsInstruments of UnitySexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessingsWindsor Report / Process* TheologyEcclesiology

30 Comments
Posted January 3, 2009 at 1:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

For years now, the Episcopal Church in the United States has been divided as leadership continues to pursue liberal-leaning policies, while conservative members continue to feel alienated and isolated. In December, a federation of Anglican Christians formed a new Anglican church in North America. That announcement came from The Common Cause Partnership, a coalition of conservative Anglican churches. Robert Lundy with Common Cause said the decision was at least three decades in the making.

"We, as The Common Cause Partnership -- and as sort of disaffected Episcopalians, Anglicans -- feel it is the one step that we have to make. And we will reach out to other Christians who are in the Episcopal Church and help them, and we hope that they reach out to us and work together for mission," Lundy shared. "But for The Common Cause Partnership and the 100,000 people who we represent, this is a step we feel that the Lord is leading us to take."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.

0 Comments
Posted January 1, 2009 at 5:44 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

An Elm Grove church says it will leave the U.S. Episcopal Church to join a rival, more conservative province.

Wednesday's announcement makes St. Edmund's Episcopal Church the first Wisconsin congregation to break with the Episcopal Church since the new Anglican Church in North America formed earlier this month.

Read it all.

Update: The parish mission statement may be found here.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Departing Parishes

15 Comments
Posted December 31, 2008 at 4:55 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rt. Rev. Donald Harvey, moderator of the Anglican Network in Canada (ANiC), has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree by Nashotah House Seminary.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of CanadaCommon Cause PartnershipEpiscopal Church (TEC)* TheologySeminary / Theological Education

0 Comments
Posted December 31, 2008 at 12:04 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

If you believe that Scripture, or Scripture and the institutional Church, is the Authority for deciding questions of meaning and morality, then you are far more likely to fall on the traditionalist side of these questions. If you believe that individual conscience is the Authority, then you are likely to be a progressive.

I don't see how the two can be reconciled, unless it is agreed by a majority that the church in question doesn't really stand for anything beyond itself. If you really do believe that Scripture and Tradition are wrong about same-sex relationships, and that it is a matter of basic justice that the teaching be changed, then you aren't going to stop fighting for that change within the church. If you believe that we are not free to throw off the authority of Scripture (and Tradition) in such matters, then to have your church declare these matters open to negotiation would be to hollow out the meaning of what the church is supposed to stand for, all for the sake of a superficial unity.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: AnalysisCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

8 Comments
Posted December 29, 2008 at 4:28 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

...the game now is going to change from now on. The object has shifted from trying to reform the old Communion (by supplanting the liberals in the US) to forming a new one. Rowan's task in the year ahead will thus change, too, from trying to hold together two disputatious groups in the same Church to trying to hold together two Churches. It can't be done, especially now that he has lost the respect of the conservatives.

So, schism in 2009? It certainly looks like it, and then the numbers belonging to each side start to matter. The conservatives in the US are in a clear minority, but when allied to the millions of Anglicans in, say, Nigeria or Uganda, they become a force to reckon with, however much the liberals would like us to ignore them.

There are many things to like in this piece, but it is significantly marred by the fact that he gets wrong what happened in 2006 at the General Convention. There was no agreement on the bishops matter in the terms requested, and on blessings what was requested was clearly not agreed to. Since the Convention, there has been an increase in same sex blessings against the teaching and practice of the Anglican Communion. So it is simply nonsense to talk of a moratorium being lifted which doesn't exist in practice throughout various parts of TEC. In any event, read it all--KSH.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: AnalysisArchbishop of Canterbury Common Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008Sexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

17 Comments
Posted December 29, 2008 at 4:18 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Over the last half-century, the American Church has become an embarrassment to the global Church. They ceased to be Anglican in any meaningful sense, or in some cases even Christian, and the rest of the Anglican world finally decided to clean house. Certain people hijacked the American Anglican "family name," but had no real ideological connection to the historic faith.

The world is telling them to go find their own house.

Only the most narrow minded person, whose vision of Christianity is parochial enough to see the Church as primarily European and North American, could be confused about the situation. The amazing thing is how patient the global majority has been with the struggling, shrinking American church.

Global Anglicans are a tolerant group, but are finally telling the liberal interlopers to go their own way and stop pretending to be Anglican. They are reaching out to the actual Anglicans that remain in North America and are working to rebuild the American branch of the movement. Worldwide Anglicanism is trying to save the brand!

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

11 Comments
Posted December 23, 2008 at 6:55 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Each new meeting of the Communion now reinforces this impression that the ‘schism’ has taken place, because complete sacramental communion is demonstrably no longer possible. The most recent news, of course, is that an alternative province is being formed across North America bringing together the various acronyms and groupings we are coming used to: the Network, CANA, dioceses linked to the Southern Cone, and parishes under the oversight of Rwanda, Kenya, Uganda, together with traditionalist continuing churches which long ago broke away.

In the absence of any meaningful overtures from the official American and Canadian leadership, and no proposals for any effective alternative oversight, and amid a determination to press on with scandalous and acrimonious litigation, there is probably no option now other than a third North American province. Furthermore, the level of theological heterodoxy in the Episcopal Church is worryingly high. A number of dioceses have rejected the moratoria which were called for with impunity and it looks clear that at the next General Convention it will be business as usual in the liberal drift of the denomination.

Apart from the sexuality issue, relativism both morally and theologically is normal theology in TEC. Very few Episcopal leaders will say with any confidence that Jesus Christ is the only way to God; instead they apologise for missionary activity in the past, and proclaim a muted, stunted, deformed Gospel to the world.

Yet the formation of a third province is not universally favoured by those who otherwise reject North American innovation. The Gafcon route is an ‘outside’ strategy that has given up on the ability of the Anglican Communion to discipline itself in accordance with Bible and tradition. There is however an insider’s strategy as well, which believes that the Windsor process is roughly the right direction for the Communion to go, that it will actually result in discipline.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: AnalysisCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceInstruments of Unity

8 Comments
Posted December 22, 2008 at 8:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Whether it is viewed with sympathy or suspicion, there is no doubt that the new Anglican Church in North America changes the Anglican map. To be more accurate, it lays a new map (a relief map, perhaps?) on top of the old one, so that in his otherwise factual article the new Archbishop, the Most Revd Bob Duncan, can say artlessly that the charge of boundary-crossing, condemned by the Windsor report, “is most effectively and completely addressed by general acceptance of the new province”. Although territorial confusion matters less where a church is defined more by congregational membership than place of abode, the parish ideal is none the less strong.

When a new state declares independence, the international community decides whether or not to recognise it by measuring it against a set of standards. In this instance, does the new Church have integrity? On the subject of territorial dis­tinctiveness, as we have seen, the jury is still out. Is it Christian? Undoubtedly: it is as faithful a realisation of Christ’s will as any Church manages to be. Is it Anglican? Yes and no: its worship is, but its formation without any reference to the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Anglican Consultative Council, or the Primates’ Meeting suggests otherwise.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

7 Comments
Posted December 21, 2008 at 1:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We need a unified body both to heal the divisions among ourselves and to give the broader Anglican Communion a unified and coherent partner with which to be in relation­ship.

Forming the Anglican Church in North America is a significant step forward on both these fronts. It is an amazing God-given healing of that internal division and an opportunity for forming constructive relation­ships within the Communion.

Eleven fragments of “mainstream” Anglicanism in the United States and Canada were involved in the adop­tion of the provisional constitution: the American Anglican Council, the Anglican Coalition in Canada, the Anglican Communion Network, the Anglican Mission in the Americas (Rwanda), the Anglican Network in Canada, the Convocation of An­glicans in North America (Nigeria), Forward in Faith North America, the Missionary Convocations of Kenya, Southern Cone (including the Bolivia and Recife networks), and Uganda, together with the Reformed Episcopal Church.

These fragments draw together some 700 congregations in North Am­erica, with an estimated 100,000 worshippers on average on any given Sunday. This constellation is thus numbered as larger than 13 of the provinces of the Anglican Com­munion (including Scotland and Wales), and compares to the 750,000 the Episcopal Church in the United States claims to draw every Sunday.

Please note: this was in last week's print edition of the Church Times, which was available on the web for subscribers only. It is now available to all. Please read it attentively.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCANACommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Pittsburgh* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesAnglican Continuum

14 Comments
Posted December 20, 2008 at 5:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

What about the definition of Anglican? In the October issue of First Things, I expressed the hope that last summer’s Lambeth Conference, and particularly the leadership of Archbishop Rowan Williams, gave strong evidence that the center of the Anglican communion intended to hold together; that the Episcopal left and the GAFCON right would not, in fact, carry the day and so lead the communion ever-further down the road to fragmentation and incoherence. Since that time, most of the action has been on the GAFCON and Bishop Duncan side; and the more influence they have, the less chance there is of an eventual coming-together of things.

But the ball is now in center court, as it were—this February’s meeting of the Anglican primates will be crucial, as will the meeting of the Covenant Design Group in April and the Anglican Consultative Council’s meeting in May. If Anglicanism is truly to mean something beyond the local, these meetings will carry forward the Lambeth vision of a genuinely covenanted “global” and “catholic church,” with its ministry, faith, and sacraments “united and interdependent throughout the world,” as Rowan Williams has put it.

There are, of course, no guarantees. The forces of dissolution and division right now are strong, and it is always much easier to pull apart than it is to hold together. The question “Anglican or Episcopalian?” may always be with us; but at the least, we may still be able to hope that the question “What kind of Anglican are you?” will not become just as common.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: AnalysisArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican PrimatesCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008Lambeth 2008Windsor Report / Process

21 Comments
Posted December 20, 2008 at 11:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

(Via Email):

New diocese planned for North Texas area

According to Internet announcements, plans are under way for a new Episcopal diocese to be formed in North Central Texas. The sources indicate that an organizing meeting or convention may be held as soon as Feb. 7, 2009. The new diocese is being organized by North Texas Episcopalians who wish to be affiliated with the General Convention of The Episcopal Church. A group known as Steering Committee North Texas Episcopalians is initiating the organizing effort.

The announcement has appeared on the Steering Committee’s Web site and on a site launched by a group leaving St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Arlington. It indicates that the probable conference site is All Saints’ Episcopal School in Fort Worth, and that the organizers hope TEC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori will be present to preside.

Fr. Christopher Jambor, rector of All Saints’ parish in Fort Worth, is named as the head of the organizing committee. The business of the meeting is expected to be the adoption of a constitution and canons for the new diocese, as well as the election of founding officers.

It was not immediately clear how many conferees will participate in the event, how they will be selected, or what congregations or other groups they will represent.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American Province

10 Comments
Posted December 18, 2008 at 4:46 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Once upon a time, the Anglican Church was a powerful presence in the U.S.A.­ known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the U.S.A. or more recently as The Episcopal Church.­ It claimed a large percentage of the population (16% in 1789) and an even larger representation among the leaders of our great nation.

The language of its liturgy shaped much of our culture and its cathedrals and churches were a witness to the community. Today however, it is wracked with internal conflict, shrinking numbers (less than three-tenths of one percent of Americans regularly worship in Episcopal Churches) and is known more for its rejection of biblical authority and its willingness to litigate against its own clergy and congregations than for its passion for Christ. But that isn't the end of the story.

A growing number of Anglican Christians have realized that they cannot continue down this path. On December 3, as the Bishop of CANA (the Convocation of Anglicans in North America) I joined the bishops and representatives of 14 other Anglican dioceses and networks to introduce the provisional constitution of a new Anglican Church in North America.

We are making a new start. This new Church already represents more than 700 congregations across the nation with a diverse leadership that is committed to the centrality of Christ and the trustworthiness of the Bible as we seek to live out our faith in an authentic way.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCANACommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts

2 Comments
Posted December 18, 2008 at 1:31 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This is a complicated issue for many of us who worry about the theological direction of the Episcopal Church in the USA (ECUSA). For one thing, I hate to see conservatives leave over women's ordination. What that means, among other things, is that they are abandoning many dedicated women clergy who are themselves conservative on the other two issues: biblical authority and homosexuality. But we do have to be clear that it is not enough to say that the departing conservatives are simply setting up "a separate denomination." In this case they are aligning themselves with the growing majority of Anglican churches around the world--an alignment that liberal Episcopalians are choosing to abandon by their recent actions.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesEvangelicals

62 Comments
Posted December 17, 2008 at 9:33 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The standing committee of the Diocese of Quincy recently clarified its relationship with The Episcopal Church and its former bishop, the Rt. Rev. Keith L. Ackerman, who resigned as bishop of the diocese Nov. 1.

“Bishop Ackerman fully supports those of us who have realigned with the Province of the Southern Cone and who are moving forward, as part of the Common Cause Partnership, to build a united, orthodox Anglican province here in the U.S. and Canada,” said the Rev. Canon Ed den Blaauwen, president of the standing committee and vicar general. Canon den Blaauwen added that Bishop Ackerman serves as one of seven lead bishops of the Common Cause Partnership in his role as president of Forward in Faith/North America. That organization has worked for almost two decades for the creation of a traditional Anglican province in the U.S.

“The new province I have long supported is now becoming a reality,” Bishop Ackerman said, “but there are still churches in The Episcopal Church who need care from orthodox bishops.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalCommon Cause Partnership--Proposed Formation of a new North American ProvinceEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Quincy

0 Comments
Posted December 17, 2008 at 8:39 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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