Posted by Kendall Harmon

A service to mark the 20th Anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide will take place on Monday 7 April at 7.30 p.m. in St Anne’s Cathedral Belfast. The speaker will be the Presbyterian Moderator, The Rt Revd Dr Rob Craig.

The Revd Canon Jerome Munyangaju, Rector of Killyleagh, who – along with the Dean of St Anne’s, the Very Revd John Mann – will also participate in the service, said in advance of it: ‘This year, the 7th of April marks the commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. This 20th anniversary is an important occasion on which we remember over a million lives brutally lost in just 100 days. Their cries should have been answered, yet the international community, aware of the desperate situation, chose not to intervene. The country and its people have scarring memories of the violent killings, pain and trauma. Kwibuka (remembering) of our past helps toward the healing of our future....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandChurch of Rwanda* Christian Life / Church LifeLiturgy, Music, WorshipSpirituality/Prayer* Culture-WatchHistoryViolence* International News & CommentaryAfricaRwandaEngland / UK--Ireland* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

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Posted April 7, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Deirdre Lyons, Pearse's wife and director of Alltech's corporate image, is spearheading plans to renovate the building, which is surrounded by 300,000 graves, including that of Pearse Lyons' grandfather, John Hubert Lyons.

"I'm working with a historic preservation architect and a team to restore it to its former glory," Deirdre Lyons said. The building hasn't been a church in decades and most recently was a lighting store, so it is in pretty sad shape, she said. Half the steeple and the stained glass windows are gone.

Alltech paid about $900,000 for the building, plus about $45,000 to the Church of Ireland to release the site from covenants that would have prevented the sale or use of alcohol.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchAlcohol/Drinking* Economics, PoliticsEconomyCorporations/Corporate LifeHousing/Real Estate Market* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

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Posted February 5, 2014 at 7:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Church leaders are encouraging politicians to sustain the momentum and energy generated by the Haass talks.

In a joint statement from the leaders of the Roman Catholic, Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist Churches together with the Irish Council of Churches they applaud the ‘strenuous and sincere efforts put in by all involved in seeking to find solutions to some of the most contentious issues we face’.

They also recognise the ‘profoundly challenging’ nature of the issues to be addressed but firmly believe that ‘a peaceful and reconciled society is possible’.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchHistoryReligion & CultureViolence* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesMethodistPresbyterianRoman Catholic* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

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Posted January 13, 2014 at 4:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Church of Ireland has “no current plans” to follow the example of Anglican church leaders in England and introduce a devil-free version of the traditional baptism service.

In the new wording, currently being-road tested in 400 parishes across the water, parents and godparents are being asked if they “reject evil, and all its many forms, and all empty promises”. In the traditional version, they are asked if they “reject the devil and all rebellion against God”.

The move follows a motion brought to the church’s General Synod from the a group of clergy in Liverpool, who sought to alter the baptism service to include “culturally appropriate and accessible language”.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* TheologySacramental TheologyBaptism

2 Comments
Posted January 9, 2014 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The UK and Ireland's first woman bishop has been consecrated by the Anglican Church at a service in Dublin on Saturday.

The Reverend Pat Storey, a rector in Londonderry, was appointed in September.

She was elected by the Church of Ireland as Bishop of Meath and Kildare, in the Republic of Ireland.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

2 Comments
Posted November 30, 2013 at 11:10 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A senior figure in the Church of Ireland has criticized members of his own church for being dismissive of Catholics.

Anglican Archbishop Michael Jackson of Dublin also said his members needed to be kinder to fellow Protestants who had married Catholics.

Referring to a recent political debate on abortion, Archbishop Jackson said, "I remember earlier this year the deeply pejorative remarks I heard directed against the Roman Catholic Church by members of these dioceses to me because of its stance and principle on abortion.

"The comments were conversational but it was, more than anything, the assumption of an entitlement to be dismissive more than the criticism of content of the other tradition that came across as instinctive," he said, writing in The Irish Times newspaper.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

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Posted October 22, 2013 at 11:12 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The first and most important identity for any of us is that each of us is a child of God, created by him and made in his image and likeness. This is crucially important in the way we live, in how we respond to God and in how we treat each and every other person. If we get this wrong, and regard any of our other identities as of more significance, we are simply a danger to ourselves and other people. If we believe that we are each made in God’s image and likeness we can never treat any other person with anything less than dignity. If we do not get this right, everything else will be wrong in our lives. Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, the former Chief Rabbi of Britain, once wrote that it is indeed difficult to see the image of God in those who are not in our image. Yet it is essential that we should do it.

A second primary identity for us is that we are disciples of Jesus Christ. We are disciples which means “learners”, never smug, never totally satisfied with ourselves, never judgmental of others, sometimes falling but nevertheless being picked up and gently placed on our feet again by a loving Lord. An identity that could be summed up as “following, learning, growing, and telling of Christ”. It is to this area that I will be devoting much of the content of my “roadshows” around the diocese next month.
These are the two identities that we should place above all else – made in God’s image and likeness, and our discipleship of Jesus Christ. Anything that takes their place is simply idolatrous.

There is a third identity which should never be confused with those of which I have spoken but which nevertheless should mould how we live in the service of Jesus Christ. We are members of a particular Christian tradition and we should feel confidence although never arrogance in this identity. T

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican IdentityAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

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Posted October 15, 2013 at 3:28 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The married mother of two, who grew up in Belfast, said she was both "excited and daunted" by the historic appointment.

"I have had an extraordinarily happy experience in St Augustine's and in this wonderful city, which I will be sad to leave," she said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchWomen

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Posted September 21, 2013 at 12:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Church of Ireland has appointed its first ever woman bishop as the new Bishop of Meath and Kildare.

Fifty-three-year-old Revd Pat (Patricia) Storey is married with two adult children and is currently Rector of St Augustine’s Parish in Derry.

She succeeds the Church of Ireland Primate, Archbishop Richard Clarke of Armagh, in the role.

Responding to the news, Archbishop Clarke said he was “certain that her ministry in the Dioceses of Meath and Kildare and the wider Church will be a blessing to many.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchWomen

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Posted September 21, 2013 at 12:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Mark Durkan recalled his days as a minister in the Executive during the debate on same-sex marriage.

"Under powers that came from the old position of Lord Lieutenant General in Ireland from the 17th century, I had to sign if a new Church of Ireland church was created," he told MPs.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchHistory

0 Comments
Posted May 30, 2013 at 1:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

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Posted May 28, 2013 at 4:46 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Ven. Leslie Stevenson, who was to have been consecrated this week as Bishop of Meath & Kildare, in the Irish Republic, withdrew on Sunday after a press campaign against him.

His decision to step aside followed two newspaper articles. One in the Dublin-based Sunday Business Post noted that he would be the first divorced bishop in the history of the Church of Ireland, and that he had had a relationship after his first marriage failed.

The second appeared last Friday in the Belfast-based Nationalist daily Irish News, which suggested that Archdeacon Stevenson's consecration was in doubt. It named the woman with whom he had had a relationship, who is now a serving priest in the diocese of Connor.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchMarriage & FamilyMediaReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

2 Comments
Posted May 3, 2013 at 5:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At the heart of Christmas, we connect in particular with the wonder that God has such a total love for the world that he connects with us in the most complete of ways, in the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. It is our task to encourage others as well as ourselves to make this connection. And we are to make this connection easier to grasp for others, through our witness to the love of Christ, and in our unselfconscious care for the unloved and unwanted of this world.

There can be surely little doubt that when people stop connecting with their religious faith – their sense that they are in the hands of a God who loves them – they may easily then start to lose faith in themselves, and hence lose faith also in those around them, and so become angry, embittered and fearful. For some, connecting with the faith they have inherited is natural and straightforward, for others connecting with religious faith is far from easy; whereas for others it is something utterly contemptible. For Christian disciples there is at Christmas an eternal reminder that we are loved for ourselves, and that every other human person is loved equally by God.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsChristmas

0 Comments
Posted January 3, 2013 at 5:47 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Most Reverend Doctor Richard Clarke was striking the West Door of St Patrick's Cathedral three times as part of the traditional ceremony when his staff snapped in two.

However he took the mishap in good humour....

Read it all and watch the video.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

4 Comments
Posted December 17, 2012 at 3:44 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Archbishop of Dublin, the Most Revd Dr Michael Jackson, is in Cairo on Sunday 18 November 2012 attending the enthronement of the of the new Coptic Pope. He will be representing the Archbishop of Canterbury as well as the Church of Ireland. While there he will have an audience with the new Coptic Pope and deliver the following greeting from the Church of Ireland:

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryMiddle EastEgypt* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesCoptic Church

0 Comments
Posted November 18, 2012 at 11:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Cardinal Brady expressed his joy following the news, saying that he looked forward to having Bishop Clark as "a fellow citizen in the Primatial City and to working with him."

"I have known Bishop Richard Clarke for many years. In recent times we have served together on the Irish Inter-Church Committee. I have always found him to be a person of great wisdom, gentleness and kindness," he said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

0 Comments
Posted October 5, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Most Revd Dr Richard Clarke, Bishop of Meath and Kildare, has been elected Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland by the House of Bishops of the Church of Ireland, following the retirement of Archbishop Alan Harper on 30 September.

Making the announcement in St Anne’s Cathedral, Belfast, the Archbishop designate said: ‘I would like first to express my sincere gratitude for the huge trust that my fellow–bishops have placed in me by appointing me to the Archbishopric of Armagh. I truly feel neither worthy of the heritage into which I am to enter nor adequate for the tasks that lie ahead. The God of Christian belief is, however, a God of grace rather than a god who looks for human self–sufficiency. All I can pledge is that I will give this task the very best of which I am capable, and the prayer of all of us must be that God in his grace will enable some good to come from this.’

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

2 Comments
Posted October 3, 2012 at 11:34 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The religious aspect of the violence, the report says, is reinforced by radical Islamist groups like Boko Haram which, the task force believes, exploits the secular issues, and the revenge killings by Christians and Muslims.

The report states: ‘The joint delegation believes that the primary causes of the current tension and conflict in Nigeria are not inherently based in religion but rather, rooted in a complex matrix of political, social, ethnic, economic, and legal problems, among which the issue of justice—or the lack of it—looms large as a common factor. Nevertheless, the joint delegation acknowledges that there is a possibility that the current tension and conflict might become subsumed by its religious dimension (especially along geographical ‘religious fault–lines’) and so particularly warns against letting this idea—through misperception and simplification— become a self– fulfilling prediction.’

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchReligion & CultureViolence* International News & CommentaryAfricaNigeria* Religion News & CommentaryInter-Faith RelationsOther FaithsIslamMuslim-Christian relations

0 Comments
Posted August 4, 2012 at 12:04 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The president of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress Archbishop Diarmuid Martin paid warm tribute to other Church leaders in Ireland today for the support they had shown him in his role as Archbishop of Dublin....

"Relations between the churches are extremely good here in Ireland," Dr Martin said, "and the amount of personal support I have received from Archbishop John Neill (retired Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin), Archbishop Jackson (the current Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin) and the other church leaders has been astounding."

He said: "We are doing things together. We are, literally, walking together."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchGlobalizationReligion & Culture* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic* TheologySacramental TheologyEucharist

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Posted June 11, 2012 at 10:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rt Rev Michael Burrows, bishop of Cashel and Ossory, has been a target for the anger of conservative and evangelical members of the church since the same-sex union of Dean Tom Gordon almost a year ago.

Last Saturday, the church’s annual General Synod in Dublin voted by a majority of more than two-thirds to agree a motion which stated that marriage is only between a man and a woman and that any sexual activity outside of marriage is wrong.

And, in an interview with the News Letter on Monday, the leading evangelical bishop, Harold Miller, urged Dean Gordon to state whether his civil partnership was celibate or sexual.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

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Posted May 21, 2012 at 6:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Two Church of Ireland bishops have taken the highly unusual step of publicly voting against a motion brought by other bishops which re-stated the church’s traditional teaching on marriage.

The liberal bishops of Cork and Cashel and Ossory opposed a General Synod motion which attempted to clarify the church’s teaching on same-sex relationships by stating that marriage can only be between a man and a woman.

In a public display of the disagreements within the Church of Ireland’s leadership on the issue of homosexuality, Bishops Michael Burrows and Paul Colton voted against the motion at the church’s general synod in Dublin, while the 10 other bishops supported it.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry

3 Comments
Posted May 14, 2012 at 4:42 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Proposing the revised motion the Archbishop of Dublin said he appreciated the willingness of Synod to deal with the topic of Human Sexuality in the Context of Christian Belief. He apologised to those who felt that the original motion was “bounced” on them just days before Synod saying this was simply due to pressure of time and was not intended to cause hurt or insult.

The Archbishop explained that the term ‘normative’ was used theologically in the motion “to give voice to God’s perfect loving will for, in and through the creation”. “Normative is not used in any such way as to make anyone: abnormal, in the context of human sexuality or of anything else,” he stated.

Explaining the terminology of the resolution the Archbishop said the term sexual intercourse was necessary because: “It is a term which has a legally defined meaning, and it complements and sheds light on the term: chastity which is to be found in the Catechism. That is why it has to be used here, reticent though anyone might be about it”.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

9 Comments
Posted May 14, 2012 at 4:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

It is entitled "Human Sexuality in the Context of Christian Belief." Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted May 14, 2012 at 3:42 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Arising out of the atmosphere created and the desire expressed at the Conference on Human Sexuality in the Context of Christian Belief that we should continue the journey of respectful and charitable listening in pursuit of deeper and clearer understanding of the will and purpose of God in these matters, the archbishops and bishops of the Church of Ireland, with the encouragement of the Standing Committee, will seek to present three motions offering a possible way forward.

The motions that the Archbishop of Dublin and the Bishop of Down and Dromore will seek to introduce belong together. The first sets out the doctrinal understanding of marriage and the appropriate context for sexual intercourse, as currently set forth in the formularies of the Church of Ireland. To set out the current position is not to pre–determine any future adjudication the General Synod may reach on such matters. Indeed, Canon 31, which is quoted in the first motion, actually takes the form that it does as a direct result of decisions taken by the General Synod permitting the re–marriage in church of divorced persons is itself witnesses to the fact that Canons may be added, altered, refined, replaced or abolished by the General Synod at its absolute discretion.

The second motion acknowledges openly the hurt and injury experienced at times by Lesbian and Gay people as a result of the words and actions of Church members. It articulates the commitment of the Church of Ireland to being sensitive to the pastoral needs of Gay and Lesbian people and a safe and welcoming place for everyone.

The third motion, if approved, directs the Standing Committee to bring to next year’s synod recommendations for the formation of a Select Committee to study the issue of Human Sexuality in the Context of Christian Belief and to report progress to the General Synod on the basis of a specific timetable.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

2 Comments
Posted May 10, 2012 at 8:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A controversial motion to be put to the Church of Ireland’s General Synod stating that only sex within marriage is “normative” could lead to a “witch-hunt” against gay clergy, campaigners have said.

More than 20 gay, lesbian and bisexual Anglicans have signed a letter published in today’s Belfast Telegraph objecting to Resolution 8A, which states that marriage can only occur between one man and one woman for the “procreation and nurture of children”. It adds that monogamous marriage is the “only normative context for sexual relationships”.

Signatories argue that, if passed, Church members in same-sex relationships will be stigmatised.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

3 Comments
Posted May 10, 2012 at 7:46 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You can read the general motions here and the motions on sexuality there.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral Theology

10 Comments
Posted May 10, 2012 at 7:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Workshop topics will include God’s Creation and poetry, Celtic spirituality, ecology and the eucharist, ethical investments, ecology and the economy, climate change, how to become an eco–congregation and helping children and young people nurture respect for the earth....

ECI chairperson, Sr Catherine Brennan, looks forward to welcoming a broad section of people to the conference from both north and south of the border. “The stark sign of our time is a planet in peril at our hands and it is poor people who suffer most from environmental impoverishment,” she says. “Commitment to the poor and commitment to the well–being of life on this planet must go together as two inter–related dimensions of the one Christian vocation....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Economics, PoliticsEnergy, Natural Resources* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted May 9, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

If you thought that the International Eucharistic Congress in Dublin, Ireland, this June was just for Catholics, you would be wrong. “There is a genuine sense of excitement and expectation right across the Christian traditions in Ireland”, says Rev. Michael Jackson, the Anglican Archbishop of Dublin....

It may be the 50th global gathering of the Catholic Church on the Eucharist, but from the outset the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, Dr. Diarmuid Martin, decided this Congress should also become an opportunity to further the ecumenical journey in Ireland, which for historical reasons has often been an uphill climb. On the opening day of the Congress, Monday June 11th, pilgrims will explore the theme, Communion in One Baptism with key-note addresses from Br. Alois Löser (Prior of the Taizé Community, France), Dr Maria Voce (President of Focolare) and Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev (Metropolitan Archbishop of Volokolamsk -Russian Orthodox).

Listen to it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

2 Comments
Posted May 8, 2012 at 4:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Surely. But if it is not sure, if it is not certain, if it is not real, if these things are not true: then that Friday afternoon was the end. If all that went before was just the product of imaginative minds, then it would be right to turn our backs and to walk away. ‘Is it nothing to you, all you who pass by?’ asks the lamentation and we would reply, ’yes, it is nothing, for this man is dead and gone.

Christianity is not a religion of compromise or fudging, the claims made are too radical. At its very heart the Christian faith is about the supernatural and the miraculous. Christianity is not reasonable: it challenges us to be sure, or to reject it. The dying man upon the cross confronts us with the fact that here is a man being executed in a hideous manner and asks us how we respond to what we see.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsHoly WeekParish MinistryMinistry of the OrdainedPreaching / Homiletics* TheologyChristologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted April 6, 2012 at 4:06 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The 1,517 lives lost in the Titanic tragedy will be commemorated in a beautiful hand–crafted funeral pall which will be dedicated in St Anne’s Cathedral, Belfast, a century after the disaster.

The pall, made of 100 per cent Merino felt, is backed with Irish linen and dyed an indigo blue, evoking an image of the midnight sea in which the Titanic finally came to rest.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / Funerals* Culture-WatchHistory

2 Comments
Posted April 2, 2012 at 6:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Archbishop Rowan Williams is held in high affection across the Anglican Communion and, on behalf of the Church of Ireland, I offer him prayerful good wishes as he decides to step down from the hugely demanding role as Archbishop of Canterbury to take up his new responsibilities – and enter a new phase of his life – as Master of Magdelene College, Cambridge at the end of this year. While the Churches of the Anglican Communion will feel a considerable sense of loss when he departs, as an intellectual, a Christian thinker and a poet, he will bring a rich offering of gifts to this academic position. Happily, in returning to the academic sphere, Archbishop Rowan will continue to be able to contribute extensively to the intellectual life of the Communion for years to come.

The Anglican Communion has faced many deep and complex challenges over the past number of years and Rowan has sought to hold people together in unity consistently, doubtless at some real personal cost. He has brought depth of thinking, humility and sincerity to his leadership which we have valued immensely.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted March 16, 2012 at 11:36 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Book of Common Prayer, 1551

This object is doubly resonant. It is the first book printed in Ireland and, as such, marks the island’s rather belated acquisition of one of the defining features of modernity. The revolutionary process of printing on a press with moveable type was pioneered by Johannes Gutenberg in Germany almost exactly a century earlier. The delay in catching up with this new technology says much about Ireland’s absence from the mainstream of the Renaissance.

But if the advent of the first printed book brings a key aspect of modernity to Ireland, that modernity arrives in a form that is unwelcome to a substantial majority of the population....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryLiturgy, Music, Worship* Culture-WatchHistory* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

0 Comments
Posted March 11, 2012 at 11:26 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Over the past 24 hours, 450 General Synod members of the Church of Ireland (together with several ecumenical guests) have come together from across the island and all the dioceses of the Church to engage with each other on this subject in innovative ways. It has been a substantial conversation reflecting strongly held convictions characterised by clarity of expression without judgmentalism. The conference enabled interactive engagement by participants from a wide range of different perspectives, focusing on complex and sometimes contentious issues. The climate was one of respectful dialogue, all the more valuable for its structured mixing of people who have not before come together or conversed in such depth....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)

5 Comments
Posted March 10, 2012 at 2:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The recent theft of a 12th century Irish saint’s heart from a Dublin church has left local Christians stunned and devastated.

“All I would ask is that whoever took it would return it with no questions asked. It’s valueless to anyone but the Cathedral here and our community and the community of Dublin…we’re grieving over it, really,” church dean Rev. Dermot Dunne told CNA on March 5.

The heart of St. Laurence O’Toole was stolen from Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin sometime between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on March 3 and has yet to be recovered.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryLiturgy, Music, WorshipParish MinistrySpirituality/Prayer* Culture-WatchHistoryReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman Catholic* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted March 7, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The funeral cortege for well–known comedian Frank Carson, following the Requiem Mass in St Patrick’s Church, Donegall Street on the morning of Saturday 3rd March 2012, will pause at the steps of St Anne’s Cathedral. The Dean of Belfast, the Very Revd John Mann, will say:

‘We are thankful for Frank’s humour, for the happiness he spread, for embracing this Cathedral in his concern and for, at all times, expressing those great qualities of hope and love, through word and action, that transcend division and bring people together in common endeavour....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / Funerals

0 Comments
Posted March 3, 2012 at 9:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Right Revd Ken Clarke, Bishop of Kilmore, Elphin and Ardagh, has been appointed as the new full-time Mission Director of SAMS Ireland (South American Mission Society). He will take up the post later this year and continue as bishop of his diocese until the Autumn. Bishop Ken Clarke is in his twelfth year as Bishop of Kilmore, Elphin and Ardagh, having been elected as bishop on the 13th November 2000.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeMissions

0 Comments
Posted February 14, 2012 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

A man born in Nigeria and resident in Italy for a number of years, will be introduced by the Bishop of Clogher, the Rt Revd John McDowell, as diocesan curate with responsibility for the Devenish and Boho Group of Parishes at a service of introduction on Thursday 2nd February 2012 in Devenish Parish Church, Monea commencing at 7.30pm.

Mr Sampson Ajuka studied at the Queens Foundation for Theological Studies in Birmingham, was ordained in the Church of England, and served the Church in Venice, Padova and Trieste in the Diocese in Europe. Commenting on his move to the Church of Ireland, he said “moving into a new place with different culture is not an easy thing, it is like a school boy starting his primary education.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryAfricaNigeria

0 Comments
Posted January 20, 2012 at 6:39 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Archbishops and Bishops of the Church of Ireland will host a conference on the subject of ‘Human Sexuality in the context of Christian Belief’ at the Slieve Russell Hotel, Ballyconnell, Co Cavan on Friday the 9th and Saturday 10th March 2012, beginning at 4.00pm on Friday and concluding at 5.00pm on Saturday.

The bishops believe that it will be helpful to the church for members of General Synod to explore and discuss issues of human sexuality in the informal setting of a conference.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)* Theology

3 Comments
Posted January 17, 2012 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The pastoral letter of 2003 refers to those who seek a change in favour of same-sex relationships on the grounds of ‘a developing understanding of the nature of humanity and sexuality’. We would reject any implication, explicit or implied, by default or by design, that somehow those who hold to and affirm the teaching and doctrine of the church are somehow ‘less informed’ or have a ‘less developed understanding’. Whilst none of us see all things clearly, there are matters on which it is possible, on mature and informed reflection, to be clear. We welcome the inclusion of, and opportunity to engage with, all shades of opinion on the presenting issues....

We welcome this purpose and hope and pray we can conduct ourselves and our conversations with sensitivity, honesty, truth and grace. We would observe however that it is not just issues ‘related to’ human sexuality that need to be addressed, but rather issues ‘within which’ the current issue of human sexuality presents itself. We recognise the need to establish clear parameters that will enable us to deal specifically with the issue of sexuality. However, the framework in which we must think is indeed, as you have asserted, biblical, theological, and legal, to name but three. These are issues of how we interpret scripture, how faith engages with and critiques culture, of what it means to have a unity of mind and purpose, of what our mission is. The presenting issue is human sexuality but it is not the defining issue. We must not make the mistake of allowing human sexuality to become the lens through which we look at and understand wider issues.

The defining issue is our vision of God, and what it means for His people to represent Him in His mission of love to redeem His world. If we start with the ethics of human sexuality the danger is that we will end up with rather legalistic and regulated forms of wording as to what is or is not acceptable, with potentially some very hurtful and divisive dialogue along the way. If we start with our vision of God we might just end up with a renewed confidence in what it means to be a redeemed and transformed people, a new creation, a royal priesthood and a holy nation. Perhaps in so doing the Word of God made flesh may well redeem our words that they might speak truth in love, seasoned with grace. Language, and how we use it, will be very important as we proceed. We would respectfully suggest that the third purpose be stated as being ‘to explore issues that include and may be related to human sexuality’.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

0 Comments
Posted December 2, 2011 at 7:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In an email to the bishop — who is Dean Gordon’s boss and on the liberal wing of the church — the News Letter asked for an interview in an attempt to get his side of the story, which has featured a string of outspoken denunciations by Anglican clergy of both the bishop and the dean.

As the bishop of Cashel and Ossory, the Rt Rev Burrows is senior to Portadown-born Dean Gordon, who now ministers in Carlow. According to Dean Gordon, the bishop appointed him last year in the full knowledge of his 20-year relationship with talented musician Mark Duley and was aware of their intention to enter a civil partnership once the Republic’s law changed.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships

0 Comments
Posted October 18, 2011 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Church of Ireland bishops have urged their members to refrain from actions or language which could deepen the controversy of same-sex relationships within the Church.

In their Pastoral letter issued yesterday, the 12 bishops from all over Ireland also confirmed that there will be a major conference next spring on the issue, and also committed themselves to additional meetings, including a retreat where they will study and pray together.

They ask people of all shades of opinion within the Church of Ireland to refrain from any actions or the use of emotive or careless language which may further exacerbate the situation.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

2 Comments
Posted October 9, 2011 at 3:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

It is helpful, at the outset, to affirm clearly the teaching of the church on marriage. The Book of Common Prayer describes marriage as ‘part of God’s creation and a holy mystery in which man and woman become one flesh.’ It is to be monogamous, with a publicly declared intention that it be life–long. The church’s teaching has been faithfulness within marriage as the normative context for sexual expression.

The state, in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, has provided in law for civil partnerships between persons of the same gender. Such partnerships are one means of conferring specific legal rights, but may not necessarily involve sexual expression. It is clear that they are not recognised by the church as marriage. Indeed they are not recognised by the state as marriage in either jurisdiction. However, because civil partnerships are narrowly limited to people of the same gender, they are often perceived as an equivalent to or imitation of marriage for same sex couples.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted October 9, 2011 at 2:36 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

No one is revealing the details of a discussion held within the framework of collegiality, but it is likely that two different views emerged both quickly and sharply on the first day.

Bishop Harold Miller, an articulate northern bishop from the Down and Dromore diocese, would have been the most credible spokesman for the conservative, evangelical view that homosexuality is contrary to scripture and that the Church of Ireland should not appoint to senior office a man who is in a civil partnership. On the other hand, Bishop Michael Burrows, from the southern diocese of Cashel, would have had some explaining to do about his decision to appoint Tom Gordon as Dean of Leighlin, while being aware of his same-sex relationship.

Would Bishop Burrows have outlined why he had no problem with such an appointment? What would have been the contributions of other, younger bishops, like the Right Reverend Trevor Williams of Limerick, with his experience of working with Corrymeela and BBC Radio Ulster, or the new Bishop of Tuam, the Right Reverend Patrick Rooke, a native of Dublin, but with a distinguished ministry in Northern Ireland?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted October 8, 2011 at 9:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Speaking to the News Letter in the Council Room of Church House on the hill of Armagh, Archbishop Harper reveals that he was aware of Dean Tom Gordon’s intention to enter a civil partnership two days before it happened.

“I knew on July 27 – and I’m quoting from the email – that a [beneficed priest] in the diocese of Cashel and Ossory was about to contract a civil partnership.

“I didn’t know who that priest was; I didn’t know who it was until after the event.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

0 Comments
Posted October 7, 2011 at 6:11 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We met over three days in an atmosphere of prayer and worship to reflect on current disquiet in the Church caused by disagreements on the matter of human sexuality. We acknowledge that this tension is a cause of distress to many.

Our discussions were frank and careful and, at times, painful. We committed ourselves to listen carefully to one another and speak openly about our differences within the context of a variety of reactions within the Church. Strengthened by our honest interchange of views, we corporately agreed a way forward.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeLiturgy, Music, WorshipParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

4 Comments
Posted October 6, 2011 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The outcry over the Bishop of Cashel & Ossory’s support for an Irish dean’s gay civil union has forced the bishop to skip the consecration of the Bishop of Tuam, Killala and Achonry.

Church leaders in Northern Ireland told The Church of England Newspaper that the Rt. Rev. Michael Burrows had been advised to stay away from the Sept 8 consecration of Bishop Patrick Rooke at St Patrick’s Cathedral in Armagh. The bishop had been told his support for clergy gay civil unions had broken the collegiality of the church and his presence would cause some participants in the ceremony to refrain from receiving the Eucharist with him.

Bishop Burrow’s office did not respond to questions from CEN, but the Church of Ireland’s press officer did confirm that the bishop “did not attend and that this was his own decision. I have no knowledge of any advice from anyone about staying away or concern with regard to receiving communion.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologySacramental TheologyEucharist

2 Comments
Posted September 26, 2011 at 7:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Two Church of Ireland rectors have broken ranks to reject Archbishop Alan Harper’s appeal for an end to discussion of the church’s first same-sex union involving a minister.

Amid growing impatience in sections of the church which has not yet made clear whether it accepts the controversial civil partnership, three weeks after the News Letter revealed the move, there are emerging warnings that if the church does not act evangelicals may find their own bishops.

In separate statements, the Rev Neville Hughes from the rural parishes of Mullabrack and Kilcluney near Markethill and the Rev Alan McCann of the urban parish of Woodburn in Carrickfergus rejected the primate of all Ireland’s call to halt discussion about the Rev Tom Gordon’s civil partnership.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted September 24, 2011 at 3:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

While civil partnership is not marriage and does not necessarily involve same- sex sexual expression, there is a very wide perception that it is a form of gay marriage, and perceptions are, of course, often as important as facts. No doubt for this reason, and also because the Christian ethical aspect of same-sex expression is theologically highly contentious, Church of England bishops ask clergy entering civil partnerships to give an undertaking that their relationship is celibate. Differing views on this subject have co-existed in a relatively settled way in the Church of Ireland during the whole inter-Anglican debate over recent years, but what has now developed jeopardises that situation. While those on one side see an advance for gay rights in the Church, those on the other side feel that there has been an unacceptable, unilateral move on the subject. There is thus a sense of ‘log-jam’, and it is dangerous.

This is a time both for an honest speaking of minds and for action that displays Christian grace....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted September 18, 2011 at 1:49 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Schism within the Church of Ireland could split the church between Ulster and the Republic of Ireland, church leaders fear, in the wake of revelations the Bishop of Cashel and Ossory permitted the Dean of Leithlin to register a same-sex civil union.

The Primate of All-Ireland, the Archbishop of Armagh Dr. Alan Harper told the Sept 11 “Sunday Sequence” programme of BBC Radio Ulster he was “very, very concerned at the potential for division” within the church over homosexuality. He also conceded that clergy criticisms over a leadership “vacuum” among the bishops were “a fair comment in all sorts of ways.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

0 Comments
Posted September 17, 2011 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Dean of Leighlin Cathedral in the Diocese of Cashel & Ossory has become the first serving Church of Ireland clergyman to enter a same-sex civil partnership in the Republic of Ireland.

The public announcement of the Dean’s same-sex civil partnership and his Bishop’s apparent support for the move is likely to pitch the Church of Ireland into the same battle that has torn apart the Episcopal Church and has the potential to divide the Irish church, sources tell CEN.

In an interview with BBC Ulster, the Very Rev Tom Gordon stated he and his partner held the ceremony in a registry office in July. Unlike the Church of England, which requires clergy who have entered same-sex civil partnerships to remain celibate, the Church of Ireland has not taken a position on the matter.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

4 Comments
Posted September 16, 2011 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I like it for its rootedness also and that it takes people seriously. I like it’s theology (but by no means all of it) or should I say it’s approach to theology.

- First, its diversity, tolerance and the most important : freedom of thought. Second, having TS Eliott and CS Lewis but also John Shelby Spong, Paul van Buren and Don Cupitt....

And of course, current problems surfaced and one said – Sadly, what attracts me most in the Anglican Church are all the things we would lose if we were to adopt the Anglican Covenant....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantAnglican IdentityAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* TheologyEcclesiology

6 Comments
Posted August 25, 2011 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

For young evangelicals, and especially Anglican evangelicals, in their early years of discipleship and ministry, John Stott was a great encouragement. Here was a man who had devoted his entire life to ministry within the Church of England, but whose ministry was never to be contained in one denomination or country, because it was essentially Gospel ministry with a worldwide vision. His thinking was clear, his writings articulate and his judgements balanced. And, thank God, he has left a heritage in his writings, from solid Biblical commentary to deep theology and practical outworking of issues. He was a person of kindness, mannerliness and carefulness, not someone who was easy to get to know, but someone who, perhaps because of a degree of privacy and distance, was able to hold together and influence vast numbers of disparate evangelicals, and gain the respect of many beyond the evangelical fold.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesEvangelicals

0 Comments
Posted July 28, 2011 at 3:39 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesEvangelicals

0 Comments
Posted July 28, 2011 at 3:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Strong feelings were expressed at the Church of Ireland General Synod in Armagh over last week’s announcement by the Government that its jobs initiative is to be funded by a levy on private sector pensions.

The synod also agreed to subscribe to, rather than adopt, the Anglican Covenant made necessary by divisions in the worldwide Anglican Communion over gay clergy issues and to include a prayer for Northern Ireland in the Book of Common Prayer.

Sydney Gamble, chairman of the Representative Church Body executive committee, assured delegates “in light of the strength of feeling expressed . . . that we will indeed be taking every opportunity to make strong representations in relation to our specific situation” where the pensions’ levy was concerned.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted May 16, 2011 at 3:58 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In the course of the Synod debate it was stressed that the word 'subscribe' in relation to the Covenant, rather than 'adopt', was important.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted May 16, 2011 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The March 30 meeting of the Church of Ireland Episcopal Electoral College for the United Diocese of Tuam, Killala and Achonry, meeting at Church House in Armagh was unable to appoint a new bishop for the small rural diocese.

Under the constitution of the Church of Ireland, the appointment of a new bishop rests with the House of Bishops. However, the appointment of a successor for Dr Richard Henderson, who stepped down as bishop last year to take up a parochial cure in Cumbria is uncertain.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted April 8, 2011 at 7:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The former Archbishop of Armagh, Lord Eames, celebrated St Patrick’s Day last week with soldiers of the Royal Irish Regiment at memorial services at Forward Operating Base Shawquat in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province.

Lord Eames’ March 17 visit took place during the inspection by MPs and Peers of the 16 Air Assault Brigade’s work at Camp Bastion.

“It is an immense privilege to visit the Royal Irish Regiment and to see the wonderful progress they have enabled the local community in Helmand to make towards stability and confidence,” said Lord Eames, the Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All-Ireland from 1986 to 2006.

Read it all (subscription required).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Economics, PoliticsWar in Afghanistan

2 Comments
Posted March 18, 2011 at 7:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Two clear messages have gone out from Dublin.

First, the authorities in Dublin Diocese were happy to showcase TEC despite its promotion of same-sex marriage. They have hammered in a wedge that may split our Church in two.

Second, the Primates' meeting may have finally demolished the proposed Anglican Covenant, section 4.1.1 of which describes a Communion of national Churches "in which each recognises in the others the bonds of a common loyalty to Christ expressed through a common faith and order, a shared inheritance in worship, life and mission, and a readiness to live in an interdependent life".

TEC's breaches of that common faith and order are one thing; the failure of the Primates' meeting to address them is quite another....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican CovenantAnglican PrimatesPartial Primates Meeting in Dublin 2011Anglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Los AngelesSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

1 Comments
Posted March 14, 2011 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

It is one of the most difficult, yet important conversations that needs to take place in family life –and potentially one of the most embarrassing. It’s the sex and relationships discussion between parents and teenagers. But now a novel approach to ease the awkwardness of these conversations has just been developed by a joint Church and Health Trust group looking at young people and sexual health.

The Faith sub-group of the Belfast Area Sexual Health Project Board has recently produced a relationships resource, entitled ‘Unique’, for both young people and their parents that is user-friendly and easy to work through. However it is how this resource is used that will give a new approach to conversations on difficult issues.

Read it all and see what you think of the accompanying website.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchSexualityTeens / Youth* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted February 25, 2011 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Dr Michael Jackson (54), the current Church of Ireland Bishop of Clogher, was elected as the new Archbishop of Dublin and Glendalough in succession to John Neill, who has retired.

Speaking last night in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Archbishop-elect Jackson said he was looking forward to establishing a good working relationship with his Catholic counterpart, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin.

He pledged to work in close partnership with the Anglican Primate of All Ireland, Alan Harper, who presided over the electoral college at which he became the first Northerner since 1969 to be chosen as the senior Anglican prelate in the Republic.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

3 Comments
Posted February 3, 2011 at 7:55 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You can find the link here.

The segment description is as follows:

ANGLICAN SUMMIT - Canon Ken Kearon, Secretary General of the Anglican Communion interview

It starts at about 2:40 in and runs just under 6 minutes. Please take the time to listen to it all (and note it is only available for 5 more days [note,too, you may get it as well via podcast]).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican PrimatesAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted January 25, 2011 at 7:39 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Church of Ireland’s Bishop of Tuam, Killala and Achonry has written to his diocese announcing that he will be stepping down from office in January after 12 years to serve as vicar of Appleby-in-Westmoreland, Cumbria, leader of the Heart of Eden Team Ministry and Honorary Assistant Bishop of the Diocese of Carlisle.

In his pastoral letter of Nov 21, Dr. Richard Henderson thanked the clergy and laity of his West of Ireland diocese, writing: “It has been an immense privilege to be among you all.”

“Having been Bishop of Tuam, Killala and Achonry for over twelve years, with our children now grown up, and having reflected deeply on the gifts I can best offer, I have felt led increasingly to return to parish life and substantially to non-episcopal ministry,” the bishop said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry

0 Comments
Posted December 3, 2010 at 6:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You may find the link here (22 minutes, 45 seconds long)--listen to it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchWomen

0 Comments
Posted November 3, 2010 at 11:26 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Speaking to the Gazette editor in an interview while visiting Ireland, Bishop Tom Wright, former Bishop of Durham and now a Research Professor at the University of St Andrews, has said that the Church of England should not proceed to the consecration of women as Bishops if the move were to create a large division.

He said: "my own position is quite clear on this, that I have supported women Bishops in print and in person. I’ve spoken in Synod in favour of going that route, but I don’t think it’s something that ought to be done at the cost of a major division in the Church."

Bishop Wright warned that if the Church of England were not able to resolve the matter "a ‘quick fix’ resolution" would be "a recipe for long-term disaster".

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchWomen

1 Comments
Posted November 3, 2010 at 11:24 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Rev Canon Ken McReynolds, rector of Lambeg Parish, Connor Diocese, preached a record-breaking five hour 50 minute sermon on Saturday October 30.

This successful attempt to reclaim the record Mr McReynolds held five years ago has also raised more than £3,000 for the Church Army Evangelist Training Fund.

Eight of Mr McReynolds’ faithful flock remained in church for the duration of the sermon, and others dropped in for sections of it. “At no time were there less than 40 people listening which was a relief as I was dreading ending up preaching to just one person,” said Mr McReynolds.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the OrdainedPreaching / Homiletics

5 Comments
Posted November 2, 2010 at 10:46 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

(ACNS) The next Primates’ Meeting of the Anglican Communion will be held in Ireland between the 25th and 31st January, 2011.

Senior bishops from Churches across the Communion will be invited by the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams to attend the meeting taking place at the Emmaus Retreat & Conference Centre in Dublin, Ireland.
The Primates' Meeting was established in 1978 by Archbishop Donald Coggan (101st Archbishop of Canterbury) as an opportunity for “leisurely thought, prayer and deep consultation” and has met regularly since then. Today it has become an important consultative meeting for Primates and Moderators and is recognised as one of the Instruments of Communion.

Recent Primates’ Meetings have been held in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in 2007 and Alexandria, Egypt in 2009.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican PrimatesAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

19 Comments
Posted September 17, 2010 at 5:18 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Listen to it all from the Church of Ireland Gazette.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted September 13, 2010 at 4:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

As Bishops of the Church of Ireland, we join our voice to the widespread international condemnation of the plan to burn copies of the Islamic Sacred scriptures. This deliberate desecration of scriptures sacred to all Muslims is a gratuitous act of sectarianism and totally contrary to the Christian spirit of love and reconciliation. We recognise that the pain of this outrage will be felt by members of Islamic communities throughout the world.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryInter-Faith RelationsOther FaithsIslamMuslim-Christian relations

8 Comments
Posted September 10, 2010 at 6:46 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

O God, whose days are without end, and whose mercies cannot be numbered: Make us, we beseech thee, like thy servant Jeremy Taylor, deeply sensible of the shortness and uncertainty of human life; and let thy Holy Spirit lead us in holiness and righteousness all our days; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistorySpirituality/Prayer

0 Comments
Posted August 13, 2010 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

As members of the Church of Ireland we wish to express sorrow that Mary Glasspool, a person who is living in a same-sex relationship, is to be consecrated as one of two new assistant bishops in Los Angeles on May 15.

The elevation to senior church leadership of a person whose lifestyle is contrary to the will of God revealed in Scripture is both wrong and disappointing.

The decision to elect and confirm Mary Glasspool to the position of suffragan bishop is a clear rejection of the many pleas for gracious restraint made from within the Anglican Communion, not least by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Windsor Report and the most recent Primates’ Meeting. The Episcopal Church (TEC) has taken this provocative step despite knowing the division and difficulties created by Gene Robinson’s consecration in 2003. This shows a deliberate disregard for other members of the Anglican family and suggests that TEC does not greatly value unity within Anglicanism and indeed throughout the universal Church.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Los AngelesSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

0 Comments
Posted May 17, 2010 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The context of serial re-evangelization will take account of the peculiar circumstances of the present day and in Ireland we minister in circumstances uniquely our own:

* circumstances of political and social division: therefore we must be apostles of peace and justice;

* circumstances of denominational and religious diversity: therefore we must be apostles of respectful restraint and gracious dialogue;

* circumstances of recession, fear, rising unemployment and renewed poverty: therefore we must be apostles of generous care and a socially responsible morality.

* We minister among highly educated and sophisticated people: therefore we must be the apostles of learned simplicity but never of the simplistic.

* We minister in an environment, partly of our own making, in which religion is seen as discredited and irrelevant, faith is dismissed, worship is ignored and religious culture is no longer thrilling: therefore we must be apostles of joy and fulfillment, not by turning worship into entertainment but with the recognition that by worshipping and serving with integrity we may be serving angels, for God writes off no one.

These are our circumstances. The challenge to us is not to lament our circumstances but to transform them. Evangelization is the work of transformation. The role of the Church, in good times and in bad, is to stand alongside those who are finding it hardest to cope, whatever their circumstances; to exhibit in practical and personal ways the loving concern of God for all people but especially for the vulnerable; and to be a beacon of hope to the living, for nothing is more spiritually, socially and physically restorative than love and hope. We have to shape our life and institutions at all levels to reflect these priorities. We need to be less concerned about defending the institution and more concerned about enhancing the lives of people.

In the parishes, evangelization and thus transformation is rooted in, but not confined to pastoral care: clergy having time and spending time with their people and others who come to them for help; clergy enabling liturgical worship to be attractive and accessible; clergy standing beside the people of their communities in life’s difficulties. But let us not fall into the trap of assuming that all pastoral, ministerial and missional endeavour is reserved to the clergy. It is the whole People of God, the Body of Christ, present in every parish, which is called through baptism to share in the mission of God.

Read the whole thing.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

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Posted May 8, 2010 at 3:43 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina is seeking to establish a missional partnership with the Church of Ireland Diocese of Kilmore Elphin and Ardagh.

Who: Our team consists of 14 teens and 3 adults that represent 8 churches as well as Porter Gaud (Episcopal) School.

What: As ambassadors, we will seek to build relationships with and serve alongside local teens to reach out to others in their communities. Our team will begin by joining the youth of their diocese in attending a large youth event, then travel to two communities where we will engage with young people. Our aim will be to share our faith with others and encourage the youth of the Church of Ireland while getting to know one another’s cultures. Then in the summer of 2011, we will host a group from their diocese here in South Carolina to continue developing the partnership.

Check it out.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeMissions* Culture-WatchTeens / Youth* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland

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Posted May 2, 2010 at 1:53 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We are encouraged by and welcome the Communique from the Fourth Anglican Global South to South Encounter in Singapore, with its positive emphasis on mission. We particularly endorse....

2. Their agreement that the future of the Communion lies in winning the next generation for Christ and therefore their call to each region to adopt initiatives to better understand the needs and characteristics of this new generation so that we might better communicate the Gospel and Christian values to them. [12]

3. Their statement of ‘the absolute necessity and priority for the Church to disciple her members under the authority of the inspired Scriptures so that they may transform their societies and reach the nations with the Gospel’. [13]

4. Their recognition that TEC and ACC’s ‘continued refusal to honor the many requests made of them by the various meetings of the Primates throughout the Windsor Process have brought discredit to our witness’; the urging of the Archbishop of Canterbury to implement the recommended actions’; and their encouragement to Provinces ‘to reconsider their communion relationships with The Episcopal Church USA and the Anglican Church of Canada until it becomes clear that there is genuine repentance’. [18 and 19]

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of IrelandGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGlobal South to South Encounter 4 in Singapore April 2010

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Posted April 27, 2010 at 12:02 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Windsor Report of 2004 recommended "that the Episcopal Church (USA) be invited to effect a moratorium on the election and consent to the consecration of any candidate to the episcopate who is living in a same gender union until some new consensus in the Anglican Communion emerges" [Section D subsection 134, bullet point no 3].

That request was reiterated at the Primates’ Meeting in Dar es Salaam and followed at the Primates’ Meeting in Alexandria with a request for ‘gracious restraint’. The decision of The Episcopal Church in respect of the confirmation of an election and subsequent consecration of a partnered gay person to the episcopate has clearly signalled the end of ‘gracious restraint’. This is a development which I deeply regret. Whatever may be ‘the mind of a majority of the elected leaders in The Episcopal Church’, it does not reflect the mind of a majority of those in positions of leadership in the Anglican Communion and it is bound to create even greater stresses within the Communion at a time when consultations on an Anglican Covenant are at an advanced stage.

The action of The Episcopal Church also has implications for another serious issue that has strained the bonds of affection within the Communion, namely extraterritorial interventions by other provinces in the life of The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada. A moratorium on such interventions and also on the authorization of public rites of blessing for same-sex unions was requested by the Primates at Dar es Salaam. In neither of these cases has "gracious restraint" been wholly exercised.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican PrimatesPrimates Mtg Dar es Salaam, Feb 2007Anglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Los AngelesInstruments of UnitySexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

8 Comments
Posted April 6, 2010 at 4:34 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The story of Easter is told this year in a context where many of our key 'institutions' are under serious scrutiny -and it is right that it should be so. Institutions are necessary for the ordering of society, but they can take on a life of their own and become self-serving. That applies, of course, not only to the institutions of politics and society, but also -and equally- to the institutions of the church, which can be just as fallen, just as sinful, and even more profoundly disappointing, because they claim to exist for the sake of Jesus Christ.

Holy Week is a time when the institutions of Jesus’ day are exposed for what they really were. Judas, the financier of the disciples, had become selfishly attached to money, and was prepared to sell his soul for a few pieces of silver. Pilate was a political leader without the courage of his convictions, prepared to wash his hands of decisions which would not gain the popularity of the masses. And the religious leadership of the day was not prepared to brook any opposition to their status and control - even if that meant destroying the Son of God.

In the midst of it all, Jesus stands out, both in one sense as the victim of the institution, and as the perfect example of One who knew what was truly important for the human spirit - a deep and loving relationship with the Heavenly Father, which is beyond and above any religious structures, and can never be contained in human systems.

Institutions do actually matter in society: we would be in chaos without them. But this week is a serious reminder of their weakness and Easter Day is a confirmation of something even more important to grasp: that the power and life of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is set and seen even more clearly when we find ourselves in the context where human institutions let us down. Institutions grow up, and institutions have their day, but the power and reality of the living Christ endure for ever.

May you have a truly blessed Easter in the presence of the Lord of Life.

--The Rt. Rev. Harold Miller

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEaster

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Posted April 4, 2010 at 7:34 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

PH: What is the role of Central Chaplain to the Mothers' Union and how did it come about?

BC: My role is to work with the Mothers' Union (MU) senior staff/leadership team as a link to the wider Anglican Communion, reflecting the Church's thinking to the charity on relevant issues, such as marriage and family life, and to represent the MU to the wider church. I will be present as Chaplain at its major meetings and provide pastoral care through giving support and advice.

This is a three-year honorary appointment which came about by invitation from the Archbishop of Canterbury - it was a total surprise when I was asked to take it on in January but it is of course a privilege. I formally took up the office last Friday (12 February 2010) at the gathering of the Worldwide Council in Swanwick, Derbyshire, during a morning Eucharist Service when I was commissioned by the current Worldwide President of MU, Mrs Rosemary Kempsell (Church of Ireland members will recall that Lady Christine Eames formerly held this role). I understand that I am the first Irish Central Chaplain.

The role may involve occasional trips overseas in connection with the huge range of projects undertaken by MU across the globe; however, it will primarily involve attending meetings in England where I will lead worship and give support in any way I can. However, I suspect, as so often happens, there will be a few surprises along the way. In a new venture I always remember the wise advice I was once given, ‘Expect everything to be different to what you expect!’

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

3 Comments
Posted February 23, 2010 at 7:39 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Married Anglican clergy would pose two problems.

At the moment when a Catholic priest retires, the church only has responsibility towards him.

But what if the priest was married, has a wife and family?

Where would they go if they had to vacate their parochial home? What would they live on? What would happen to clerical widows or, even more distressingly, orphaned children?

Secondly, how could the Catholic Church maintain its stance on clerical celibacy?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Church of Ireland* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman CatholicPope Benedict XVI

13 Comments
Posted October 26, 2009 at 8:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At its last meeting, the Standing Committee of the Church of Ireland General Synod approved the following response to ACC-14’s request for reconsideration of the text of Section 4: “Having considered Section 4 of the Draft Anglican Covenant very carefully, and bearing in mind a full range of points of view, we believe that the text of Section 4 as it stands commends itself in the current circumstances. The term ‘Joint Standing Committee’ clearly needs to be updated following its restyling at ACC-14. We appreciate the work of the former Covenant Design Group, not least in taking into account the Church of Ireland’s views, and encourage the Archbishop of Canterbury and his new group under the chairmanship of the Archbishop of Dublin as they seek to conclude the work on the text of the Covenant.”

Read it all (go to the bottom of the page).

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican CovenantAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

2 Comments
Posted October 23, 2009 at 8:25 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

From here:

The Archbishop of Canterbury, in his office, is accorded a place of honour among the bishops of the Anglican Communion as ‘primus inter pares’. Much is expected of Archbishops of Canterbury in giving leadership in the Communion, especially in times of controversy. The personal reflections, therefore, of Archbishop Rowan Williams about the future direction and internal structures of the Anglican Communion are always to be welcomed, especially as he was among the many guests drawn from around the Anglican Communion who attended the recent General Convention of The Episcopal Church.

Archbishop Rowan’s reflections need to be seen in the context of the current discussions intended to lead to an ‘Anglican Covenant’, the ‘design group’ for which is currently headed by the Archbishop of Dublin. It remains to be seen whether, or to what extent, what the Archbishop of Canterbury describes as a ‘two track’ model will recommend itself to the autonomous provinces of the Communion. These matters all call for the most careful and unhurried scrutiny at representative provincial level and it is to be hoped that they receive the consideration they rightly deserve.


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

5 Comments
Posted August 9, 2009 at 4:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

However, the Archbishop of Canterbury’s proposed “two-tier” or “two-track” Anglican Communion is problematic in all sorts of ways, as he acknowledges himself, and we would urge him and others to think very carefully about the risks entailed.

* To be Anglican has always meant being Catholic. As Anglicans, we have always valued and defended our place within the “One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.” How could a secondary tier or track, which is walking away from the Church Catholic on matters of faith and practice as the Archbishop highlights, be considered authentically Anglican?

* To be Anglican has always meant being Scriptural. As Anglicans, we have always valued and defended the inspiration and authority of the Holy Scriptures. How could a secondary tier or track, which rejects the clear authority of Scripture on matters of faith and practice, be considered authentically Anglican?

* To be Anglican has always meant being Evangelical. As Anglicans, we have always valued and defended “the faith once delivered to the saints”. How could a secondary tier or track, which replaces the eternal gospel with secular culture, be considered authentically Anglican?

In this whole debate, there has always been a clear choice to be made. Do we remain faithful to the teaching of the Holy Scripture as received by the Church Catholic and so remain authentically Anglican? Or do we reject the teaching of the Holy Scripture and lose our right to be called Anglican, and more importantly Christian (1 Corinthians 6: 9-11)?

Sadly, The Episcopal Church in the United States has made its decision to break the moratoria, by continuing to bless same-sex unions and continuing to ordain practicing homosexuals, thus causing much pain and hurt for faithful Anglicans throughout North America and the rest of the world.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention Sexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

0 Comments
Posted August 8, 2009 at 9:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Greetings to the Anglican Church in North America
from
the Church of Ireland Evangelical Fellowship


Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ

The Church of Ireland Evangelical Fellowship includes in its membership lay people, clergy and bishops in the Church of Ireland. Our committee, meeting on 28th May 2009, unanimously resolved that we should write to encourage you in the formation of the Anglican Church in North America.

We have followed with sadness the unfolding developments in The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada. We know that many of you have suffered great loss (personal, parochial and diocesan) for upholding the orthodox faith in the face of radical innovation, and we want you to know that you have our full support.

We are glad to affirm you fully as fellow-Anglicans and we hope and pray that your new Province will be officially recognised by the Anglican Communion before long. We would like to share with you some words of the hymn known as St Patrick’s Breastplate*:

I bind unto myself the Name,
The strong Name of the Trinity;
By invocation of the same,
The Three in One, and One in Three.
Of whom all nature hath creation;
Eternal Father, Spirit, Word:
Praise to the Lord of my salvation,
Salvation is of Christ the Lord.

We assure you of our love and prayers in these times of testing.

Yours sincerely in Christ



Dermot O’Callaghan
(Chair of the Church of Ireland Evangelical Fellowship)


Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)ACNA Inaugural Assembly June 2009Anglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

2 Comments
Posted July 8, 2009 at 6:43 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Divided Christendom has yet to be that vision of reconciliation through which human kind can believe. Nevertheless ecumenism has come a long way. When we are downcast it is worth looking backwards to see how far we have come. That progress slow as it is may not yet have produced full reconciliation - it has encouraged us to stand where others stand and in so doing to begin the process of understanding God's purpose for this world.

In my work within the Anglican Communion I have been left with little doubt as to the centrality of the need for reconciliation not just between fractured Christendom but between members of the same world family of believers. What is known as ‘The Windsor Report' - as I have said a recognition that we did much of our work within these walls of St Georges' - sought to produce a road map for greater understanding of the divisions within Anglicanism. Much of that division centred on and stemmed from questions of sexuality, but my experience at that time and since has left me with little doubt that behind the headlines of the main agenda there were significant questions to be asked to do with authority, power and influence. Certainly there were sharp divisions over the question of a practising gay bishop, division that represented contrasting interpretation of Scripture and the understanding of Tradition – but whatever lies ahead for Anglicanism I am convinced that reconciliation must take account of what I have termed those other agendas. What this illustrates for me is that the process of reconciliation often involves the less obvious issues.

I am reminded of the words of the late Lord Hailsham during his lecture on Morality and the Law here in 1984: ‘One of the great evils of the present day is the tendency to sound off about specifics without an examination of first principles.’

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandWindsor Report / Process

3 Comments
Posted June 23, 2009 at 12:36 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

(ACNS) From the Most Revd Alan Harper, OBE, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland:

I very much look forward to full confirmation of the complete decommissioning of all armaments held by loyalist paramilitaries. It will represent a further and extremely welcome step towards confidence building and the normalisation of society in Northern Ireland. I recognise that on the part of the leadership of the paramilitary groups full decommissioning has been a challenging outcome to deliver; therefore, I commend those within loyalism who have argued consistently for decommissioning over a considerable period. Now full energy and commitment can be devoted to community development and the enhancement of the lives of people in loyalist areas free from the dark shadow of the gun.

By the grace of God we are now one step closer to the replacement of swords with ploughshares and spears with pruning hooks in our society. God willing, we shall soon know the day when weapons are never again lifted by one group against another and come to know what it means to learn war no more.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchViolence

0 Comments
Posted June 20, 2009 at 1:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

THE leader of the Catholic Church in Ireland has pledged his full support for work with Irish Anglicans in combating the joint challenges of sectarianism, racism and secularism.

Cardinal Sean Brady made this solemn commitment yesterday when he spoke officially in the Church of Ireland cathedral of St Patrick in Armagh at a Eucharist ceremony closing its annual General Synod.

The Cardinal made his pioneering inter-church pledge in response to an earlier address by the Anglican Bishop of Limerick, Trevor Williams, who informed him of a three-year 'Hard Gospel' project by the Church of Ireland to tackle a range of problems that have divided Catholics and Protestants in the North.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryEcumenical RelationsOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

1 Comments
Posted May 11, 2009 at 8:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Archbishop Jensen, who said he had recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of his conversion at a Billy Graham crusade, told his audience that this was a "solemn time" for Anglicans, as the Anglican Communion was facing a crisis over the authority of Scripture. Dr Jensen said that the Anglican Communion was "a very significant body of Christians" in today’s world and that anything that divided it was bad. The Communion enabled a sharing of resources, the delivery of aid and important networking across the globe.

However, he said that the 2003 consecration of Bishop Gene Robinson, a practising gay man, had deeply torn the Communion. Bishop Robinson’s consecration, he added, had been the culmination of years of liberal teaching and had taken place despite the guidance of the 1998 Lambeth Conference, the view of which had been "set aside" by the US Episcopal Church.

Since 2003, there had been attempts to "put the Communion together again", but a fundamental issue concerned the "locus of authority". By contrast, however, he said that the policy of liberals in the Communion was to delay decisions because they thought people would eventually agree with them.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesAnglican Church of AustraliaChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted May 3, 2009 at 1:29 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Many people are facing this Easter with a great sense of fear and trepidation for the future. The recent dissident murders have created a degree of nervousness about the safety of members of the PSNI. And, with all the recent layoffs in manufacturing, there is also the devastation of unemployment for people in jobs which had seemed secure.

For all of us who experience traumatic circumstances in our lives, it can feel like the long Good Friday – that nothing will ever be right again, that we will never laugh heartily again and that there is no possible future we can imagine.

The Easter story is a reminder that that is not so. There is always hope when God is involved and always new life to be experienced in the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

The message of Easter morning is this: Christ is risen! Life is worth living! God has the future in his hands both in this life and in eternity.

--The Rt. Rev. Harold Miller

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch Year / Liturgical SeasonsEaster

0 Comments
Posted April 12, 2009 at 5:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops in Northern Ireland have united to condemn the recent paramilitary-style shootings in Londonderry.

In a joint statement the Most Rev Seamus Hegarty, Catholic Bishop of Derry, and the Rt Rev Ken Good, Church of Ireland Bishop of Derry and Raphoe, said: "The recent shootings in our city must be outrightly condemned as immoral and indefensible.

“The Christian Church teaches that life is sacred. An attack on the person is a rejection of the teachings of Christ. It is also an offence against the dignity of a person created by God....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchViolence* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman Catholic

1 Comments
Posted April 3, 2009 at 9:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

From the Most Revd Alan Harper, OBE, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland:

The lethal attack on Massereene Barracks leaving two people dead and four injured is deeply distressing and deplorable. I send my heartfelt sympathy to those who have been bereaved or injured.

It has been clear for some time that there are forces of evil intent on destabilising our community and returning to days of confrontation such as we knew in the past but have been steadily working to move beyond. Across our community, efforts must be redoubled to create a respectful and inclusive society that ensures that there is no place in our midst for agents of terror. We remember those affected by this incident as we continue to pray for a sustained peace.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Culture-WatchReligion & CultureViolence* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted March 9, 2009 at 7:26 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland, the Most Revd Alan Harper, OBE has welcomed yesterday’s breakthrough in talks to secure the resumption of the Northern Ireland Assembly at Stormont.

He said: “I warmly welcome the decision on the part of the main partners in the Northern Ireland government executive to resume meetings of the executive and to take forward proposals for the devolution of policing and justice powers. I also very much welcome the decision that the executive will meet much more frequently and purposefully in order to deal with the backlog of business that has accumulated over the past five months.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

0 Comments
Posted November 20, 2008 at 10:03 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Listen to it all-featured is Saint George's, Belfast.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch History

0 Comments
Posted October 15, 2008 at 8:18 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The publication of the communiqué from the recent London meeting of the GAFCON Primates’ Council (report, page 1) marks a further development of what is termed a "movement" within Anglicanism. The development is particularly significant because of the impetus given to the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA) and because of the formation of a secretariat. One thus sees three strands to this formalised, traditional Anglican movement: first, a Primates’ Council; second, a wider body (the FCA) which is open to membership of individuals, Churches, dioceses, provinces and parachurch organisations; and third, a secretariat. A further and most significant aspect of the GAFCON Primates’ communiqué is the reference to the possible formation of a province in North America for the Common Cause Partnership. This would very probably have serious funding implications for The Episcopal Church, USA and possibly also for the Anglican Communion itself and its Communion-wide organisations.

All of this witnesses to a structured Anglican realignment, although the GAFCON constituency remains in communion with the See of Canterbury. However, what is happening all round is certainly not bringing everyone together and, as we know, there are those bishops now who simply will not receive Holy Communion with fellow bishops. Nor does the proposal to have an Anglican Covenant fare well in the GAFCON Primates’ communiqué.

The fact of the matter, however, is that the traditionalist point of view in relation to same-sex relationships - and that, after all, is the real presenting issue leading to all of this confusion - is eminently reasonable and, indeed, eminently traditional and scriptural, but it is unfortunate that the GAFCON Primates use somewhat emotive language in their communiqué (e.g. "sinful practices"), however justifiable they may consider such terminology to be. Yet the 1998 Lambeth I.10 resolution did call for sensitivity, and effectively calling good people sinners is not a sensitive approach. That, however, is not the core issue. The core issue for Anglicans is that the consecration of bishops and the ordination of clergy in active same-sex relationships and public rites of blessing of same-sex relationships are all simply so lacking in consensus within Anglicanism that we have come to this very sorry pass, which has witnessed a Lambeth Conference boycotted by one-fifth to one quarter of those bishops invited. Unity-in-diversity just cannot cope in this case.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008

6 Comments
Posted September 9, 2008 at 12:03 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I hold doggedly and dearly to the primacy of Scripture. It forms the bedrock of both my faith and my action. It constantly and properly confronts me with inadequacies and failures along with inspirations and opportunities. At the same time, I see no way in which contemporary people can continue to fly in the face of what, for example, a scientific discipline such as Genetics may yet reveal about why any of us is as we are. But through-out my main point is that the dynamic, pro-active theological method of Scripture, Tradition and Reason contains within it an elasticity of approach and a faithfulness of intention to new situa-tions, problems and difficulties: with Scriptural authenticity; within the total Tradition; informed by Reason both in terms of Hooker’s understanding of the natural law as revealing something vital
of God and in terms of rigorous criticism, scholarly acumen and scientific credibility. For none of these I make an apology in an Anglican world. The Church of Ire-land is not a confessional church and the
Anglican Communion is not a confessional Communion. Anglicanism is built on a foundation of the saving work of God in Christ but also on the utter provisionality of existing ecclesial institutions and earthly articulations of belonging. This is to do nothing more radical than to say that Anglicanism, in its self-definition, takes eschatology very seri-ously. I see a great deal of sense in the final sentence of the Editorial of The Church Times of June 20th 2008 following events in St Bartholomew’s Church, Lon-don: ‘The challenge for the Lambeth Con-ference, and for GAFCON before it, is to demonstrate how Christians can disagree profoundly and yet recognize the work-ing of the Holy Spirit in those with whom they disagree.’ This, my friends, is where The Tower of Babel meets The Day of Pentecost and is redeemed in the encounter.

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican IdentityAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

24 Comments
Posted August 28, 2008 at 9:10 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

One of my many disappointments with certain radio websites is that their material is only available for a short time after it is originally broadcast. Thus, the BBC Northern Ireland Sunday Sequence segments from last Sunday, August 10th, are now no longer available. However, for those of you who can do podcasts you can get the August 10th show via podcast and it really is worth the time. It is quite a long show (almost one hour and 27 minutes total) and includes many sections and interviews, including, for example, a section on blogging and Lambeth which includes comments from Simon Sarmiento. There is also an interview with Bishop Clive Hanford, Chair of the Windsor Continuation Group, and Archbishop Ian Earnest, Primate of the Indian Ocean, and an interview with Irish Archbishop Alan Harper. The final segment is a panel discussion with Lisa Nolland, David Virtue, Bishop Chilton Knudsen, and activist Peter Tatchell.

The link for the podcast (and remember the date of the one you are after is August 10th, the show entitled "Live from Lambeth") is here.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted August 17, 2008 at 4:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Archbishop of Canterbury, in responding to a Times report last week on correspondence in which he engaged some eight years ago on the issue of homosexuality, affirmed his acceptance of Resolution 1.10 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference "as stating the position of the worldwide Anglican Communion on issues of sexual ethics". Dr Williams continued: "As Archbishop, I understand my responsibility to be to the declared teaching of the Church I serve, and thus to discourage any developments that might imply that the position and convictions of the worldwide Communion have changed."

This statement raises questions about the role of the Lambeth Conference itself and, indeed, the ecclesial nature of the Anglican Communion.

The Lambeth Conference is, precisely, a conference. It is not a synod. To that extent, its resolutions do, indeed, carry great moral weight, but the Lambeth Conference’s decisions are neither definitive nor binding in the Churches of the Anglican Communion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of Ireland

2 Comments
Posted August 14, 2008 at 7:58 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

And, entering the debate over Archbishop Alan Harper's comment that if science can prove homosexuality to be "natural" then the Church may need to reconsider its approach to the issue, Bishop [Harold] Miller explained why he disagreed.

"If you say that because you are born with a certain inclination then it is God-given and you should be free to follow that through in your life, it doesn't make any logical sense whatever," he said.

"You would then have to say that there are many different inclinations with which people are born — even if it is true that this is an inherent thing — and which people spend their lifetime trying to subdue.
"The fact that you are born with it doesn't make any moral judgement on the inclination. People fight to subdue inherently bad tempers, depressive streaks or lots of sexual inclinations. Some inclinations are good, some are not good and some are mixed."

Bishop Miller warned that changing positions on homosexuality would open up other areas of debate, some of which may be even more divisive.
"I stood at the front gate of a Cathedral in America last month and read a notice saying 'Anybody going on the LGBT parade come to the Cathedral first and have your relationship blessed by the bishop'.

"There's no doubt about it — it's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered for a start — so the thing has widened already and you have to ask: what does it mean for someone who's born bisexual to follow their inclination or inclinations?"

Read the whole interview and there is an additional article about the interview here.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

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Posted August 8, 2008 at 6:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Metropolitan Kallistos Ware (Orthodox) was simply outstanding. ‘If one member of the body suffers, all suffer', he began, referring to 1 Corinthians 12.16. ‘Your questions are our questions'. He continued by noting that there are two questions he would be asked on his return from Lambeth (I wonder will they be the same two in Down and Dromore for me?)

* Did the bishops at Lambeth clearly proclaim Jesus Christ as the only Saviour of the world?
* Did they clearly uphold Christian teaching on marriage and the family?

On the first, from the Indaba reflections, he is clear we pass the test, but on the second, he felt there was a degree of ambiguity. Have we fully affirmed Lambeth 1.10, he asked? His speech finished with a clear comment that our answers on these questions would have a decisive impact on future ecumenical dialogue with the orthodox churches, and that truth matters more than outward unity. I wanted to say ‘Amen'!

The second ecumenical speaker was Professor Ian Torrance, representing the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, who was also most helpful in his comments. He noted that some people were living with the notion that the Anglican Communion might ‘self-correct', which he said he did not believe. A quiet and reserved man, he had given himself to a great deal of listening, and said ‘I could feel the anxiety'. His speech ended with a quote from St Cyprian about bishops (great to have a Presbyterian telling us what bishops should be!), ‘The episcopate is one, each part of which is held by each bishop for the whole.' The message couldn't be clearer.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008

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Posted August 7, 2008 at 4:58 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The communion's strength has always been its capacity to fudge difference in the interest of cohesion; to place human relationship before rigidity.

This does not mean Anglicanism is out of the woods on human sexuality issues. The risk of schism remains.

But what it succeeded in doing at Lambeth was to secure more - and very necessary - time. It also allowed those present to gain a deeper understanding of where others are coming from on same-sex issues.

The scale of the differences between liberal and conservative elements within the communion is demonstrated by the fact that approximately a quarter of the communion's bishops were absent from the conference - in protest at the handling of these same-sex issues by Dr Williams and others.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

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Posted August 6, 2008 at 7:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

BMJ: We have, as you’ll know, been looking at various themes in our ‘indaba’ groups: the bishop in mission; as a leader in faith in inter-faith encounter; at the environment; and as bishops in solidarity with the world’s poor. Some might think that these seem peripheral. I would say, however, that they are intrinsic to our life and work as bishops. These discussions have had tremendous vitality and been of great importance, enabling us to go back to our own dioceses and countries with a sense of relationship.

Today (Friday 1/8/08) and yesterday we have explored the matter of the Anglican Covenant and the continuation of the Windsor process. Our focus yesterday on human sexuality was looked at in its total context, looking at relationships and exploitation, for example. People were honest with each other and I was encouraged and inspired. We certainly do have difficulties within the Communion in this area, but other areas are also important.

It is worth mentioning that our ‘indaba’ groups are, of course, made up of 40 or so bishops who are used and conditioned to acting as chairpersons in their day-to-day lives, so they have set that ‘chairing’ role aside in order to really listen to one another.

I think it is clear that the Anglican Covenant will have to be something more than an exercise in discipline but draw on all the other reflections of our time here at Lambeth.

Read it all.



Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008

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Posted August 2, 2008 at 10:18 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In their letter, the group — which is largely formed from the northern Church — said of Archbishop Harper's address in which he made his comments about homosexuality: "We are saddened that one who is to protect the faith...should so confuse, hurt and divide the people of God."

The group said that the archbishop's address had "contradicted the Church of Ireland's own position," and added: "We are dismayed at the lack of clarity and the resulting confusion of the archbishop's approach to human sexuality, especially homosexuality.

"We are painfully aware that this issue has the potential to rip the fabric of the Anglican Communion apart...and we are distressed that the archbishop should inflame divisions even further."

And, speaking of the recent Global Anglican Future Conference gathering of traditional and evangelical Anglicans in Jerusalem, the group said: "Their conference statement fills us with greater confidence and engenders a greater unity than our own Primate's speech.

"We call upon the archbishop...to reconsider his position on this issue."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008Sexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings

2 Comments
Posted August 2, 2008 at 10:17 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Listen to it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of IrelandLambeth 2008

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Posted July 31, 2008 at 2:13 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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