Posted by Kendall Harmon

Ricochet is a surfing superstar who helps teach the disabled to hang ten, too.

Watch it all from NBC.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHealth & MedicinePsychology* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted July 28, 2014 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bats are being treated as though they are more important than worshippers, a Conservative peer has said, as he urged a fightback against churches being turned into “historic bat barns”.

Lord Cormack, a committed Christian, told the House of Lords that bats are a causing a "menace" to historic places of worship.

The former MP for South Staffordshire and Vice President of the National Churches Trust said the mammals were "a particular menace to many old churches" pointing to cases where "remarkable 15th-century brasses" were being corroded by bat droppings.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Culture-WatchHistoryReligion & CultureRural/Town Life* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

1 Comments
Posted June 13, 2014 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all--simply amazing. From the basement of a drug dealer, go figure.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography

0 Comments
Posted May 25, 2014 at 12:35 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This is just wow--watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography* International News & CommentaryCanada

0 Comments
Posted May 21, 2014 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

After three deployments to Iraq and three to Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Dennis Swols is agitated, prone to bouts of anger and unable to really talk about his time on the battlefield.

But as Swols sits in a small office in the Robinson Health Clinic at Fort Bragg, his hand drops to the furry head beside him and his mood brightens. Settled at his feet, Lexy, a 5-year-old German shepherd, gives Swols a few moments of distraction.

It's her job. And, according to Swols, she's good at it.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHealth & MedicinePsychologyStress* Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, Military* General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

1 Comments
Posted May 14, 2014 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out (Hat tip:TF).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsHumor / TriviaPhotos/Photography

0 Comments
Posted May 9, 2014 at 5:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

April was one of the most successful months in the South Carolina Aquarium's 14-year history, thanks to a rare visit from a band of dancing mermaids.

The aquarium, which is a nonprofit organization, saw record attendance during the month it played host to the World Famous Mermaids of Florida's Weeki Wachee Springs State Park, a team of female entertainers who wear elaborate fish-tailed costumes and perform synchronized underwater dances.

Read it all from the local paper and you have to love the picture.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchUrban/City Life and Issues* Economics, PoliticsEconomy* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted May 4, 2014 at 4:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



For those interested you may read a lot more about Camp Saint Christopher there.

Filed under: * By Kendall* General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted April 26, 2014 at 11:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You know those lonely nights and weekends when you're left to your own devices and forced to entertain yourself? Maybe you ponder the meaning of life, maybe you tackle a creative project or maybe you -- wait, let's face it: You probably turn on Netflix. Well your dog faces the same lonely existential crisis and his solution is, naturally, solo fetch.

Hey, it's better than destroying your shoes.

We put together a compilation above of pooches tossing the old ball/stick around by themselves, and uh, to themselves.

This is just wonderful--Enjoy it all--KSH.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted April 26, 2014 at 8:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In a conflict that pits animal welfare against religious rights, Denmark has ordered that all food animals must be stunned before being killed. The move effectively bans the ritual slaughter methods prescribed in both Muslim and Jewish tradition.

Read or listen to it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & CultureViolence* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEuropeDenmark* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted April 10, 2014 at 4:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The escalating slaughter of elephants and rhinos is drawing the anger of conservationist clerics, who have begun enlisting church members in the battle to save Africa’s wildlife.

The clerics are driven by a view that these animals are God’s gifts to nature and a critical part of Africa’s heritage.

In Kenya, their concerns heightened in mid-March after the conservation group Wildlife Direct said 16 rhinos had been gunned down in the first three months of the year. More than 30 elephants have also been slaughtered since January.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAfrica* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted March 26, 2014 at 11:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Nebraska is truly a flyover state for millions of snow geese, sandhill cranes and other migratory birds traveling north from south of the border during early spring. The area has become world famous for bird watchers who themselves migrate to the Audubon's Rowe Sanctuary along Nebraska's Platte River to see and hear the birds up close.

Watch the whole thrilling video (under three minutes) and please enjoy this one also.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsEnergy, Natural Resources* General InterestAnimalsWeather* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.

0 Comments
Posted March 21, 2014 at 3:30 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Bats are making life unbearable for congregations by defecating on worshippers from roofs as well as bell towers, according to a report to the Church Buildings Council of the Church of England.

“Bats in churches are no joke for those who have to clean up the mess behind,” said Anne Sloman, chair of the council. “Their presence in large numbers is making it impossible for us to open churches for a whole variety of social and community uses as well as making life miserable for worshippers, and we are seriously worried about the irreparable damage bats are causing to priceless church artifacts.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Christian Life / Church LifeLiturgy, Music, WorshipParish Ministry* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted March 13, 2014 at 3:51 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Captain Dave Anderson of Capt. Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari in Dana Point, California, at great personal risk, has recently filmed and edited a 5-minute video that contains some of the most beautiful, jaw-dropping, footage ever taken with a drone from the air of a huge mega-pod of thousands of common dolphins stampeding off Dana Point, California, three gray whales migrating together down the coast off San Clemente, California, and heartwarming close-ups hovering over a newborn Humpback whale calf snuggling and playing with its mom as an escort whale stands guard nearby, filmed recently in Maui.

It is only about 5 1/3 minutes long-- it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography

0 Comments
Posted March 9, 2014 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The religious slaughter of animals should be banned if Muslims and Jews refuse to adopt more humane methods of killing, the new leader of Britain’s vets has said.

John Blackwell, president-elect of the British Veterinary Association, said that the traditional practice of slitting animals’ throats and allowing them to bleed to death for halal and kosher meat caused unnecessary suffering.

He urged Jews and Muslims to allow poultry, sheep and cattle to be stunned unconscious before they are killed. If the two faiths refuse, Mr Blackwell wants ministers to consider following the example of Denmark by banning the slaughter of animals that are not stunned first.

Read it all (subscription required).

Filed under: * Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK* Religion News & CommentaryOther FaithsIslamJudaism* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted March 7, 2014 at 1:46 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Justified, one of television’s best shows, engages with the rather alien subculture of snake-handling in a way that contrasts favorably to the gloating I saw over the death of Pastor Coots. We can mock such people for their willful ignorance of the science of human origins or the textual criticism of the original form of Mark, but we can also appreciate that this same stubborn faith is one that says all people are created in the image of God.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / FuneralsMinistry of the Ordained* Culture-WatchReligion & CultureRural/Town Life* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted February 19, 2014 at 6:09 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Rare references in Babylonian texts and representations from other parts of the Near East show that camels were known in the Age of the Patriarchs, about 2000-1500 BC. Such discoveries are rare because the camel was not at home in urban societies, but useful for long journeys across the steppe and desert.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchBooksHistoryMediaReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted February 15, 2014 at 9:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

....evangelical scholars say the claims are overblown.

The use of camels for copper mining is an important discovery. "But to extrapolate from that and say they never had domesticated camels anywhere else in Israel in the 1,000 years before that is an overreach," said Todd Bolen, professor of Biblical Studies at The Master's College in Santa Clarita, California. "The conclusions are overstated."

While it has been difficult for archaeologists and historians to pin down the exact time and location when camels were domesticated, there is evidence to suggest that the Genesis accounts are not a biblical anachronism.

Two recent academic papers written by evangelical scholars—Konrad Martin Heide, a lecturer at Philipps University of Marburg, Germany; and Titus Kennedy, an adjunct professor at Biola University—both refer to earlier depictions of men riding or leading camels, some that date to the early second millenium BC.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHistoryMediaReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted February 15, 2014 at 9:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This is just wow--watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography

1 Comments
Posted February 14, 2014 at 5:02 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The amount of coverage of Rocco's untimely death -- including that in the Post-Gazette -- was mentioned almost everywhere I went last week. No one called the coverage unseemly exactly, but it was often called excessive. Even PG political cartoonist Rob Rogers, who can reliably be counted on to offer a contrarian view on almost everything, penned a genuinely sentimental cartoon in honor of Rocco.

One of my colleagues, a fellow dog lover, said that the Rocco story struck a chord because whatever one's view of police and their tactics in any given neighborhood, it is difficult to find people who don't like dogs. YouTube probably wouldn't exist if it weren't for our tendency to anthropomorphize our pets' behavior. A cat playing a piano is one of the most viewed videos in history.

Heartwarming videos of dogs going bonkers greeting their masters returning from stints in Iraq and Afghanistan garner millions of hits, "likes" and tweets on social media. It is impossible to witness such deep cross-species friendship in these videos without shedding a tear if you're a dog lover.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesPolice/FireUrban/City Life and Issues* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted February 11, 2014 at 11:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchMedia* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted February 2, 2014 at 5:04 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.


Filed under: * Culture-WatchBlogging & the InternetScience & Technology* General InterestAnimalsPhotos/Photography

0 Comments
Posted February 1, 2014 at 7:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Scientists and biotechnology companies are developing what could become the next powerful weapon in the war on pests — one that harnesses a Nobel Prize-winning discovery to kill insects and pathogens by disabling their genes.

By zeroing in on a genetic sequence unique to one species, the technique has the potential to kill a pest without harming beneficial insects. That would be a big advance over chemical pesticides.

“If you use a neuro-poison, it kills everything,” said Subba Reddy Palli, an entomologist at the University of Kentucky who is researching the technology, which is called RNA interference. “But this one is very target-specific.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchGlobalizationScience & Technology* Economics, PoliticsEconomyConsumer/consumer spendingCorporations/Corporate LifeEnergy, Natural Resources* General InterestAnimals* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted January 31, 2014 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Scientists returned to the Amazon rainforest in December to collect data on one of their biggest finds of 2012: a spider that uses insect corpses and jungle trash to build big, spider-shaped decoys in its web.

But these Peruvian spiders, presumed to be a new species of Cyclosa, are not the sole sculptors of false arachnids. A second decoy spider lives in the Philippines, on the island of Negros. Finding two spiders that make such similar designs, 11,000 miles apart, has left scientists wondering how the behavior evolved and if the decoys serve as lures for prey or as an anti-predator defense system. The discoveries also suggest there may be even more sculpting arachnids.

You just have to know what to look for.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted January 22, 2014 at 11:02 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchSports* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted January 20, 2014 at 12:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Lisa Washam, who drove 500 miles from Lima, Ohio, to see the panda’s debut, had tears in her eyes as looked at the photos she took in her two minutes at the window watching Bao Bao.

“She’s so beautiful,” she said. “I feel she’s looking at me....”

[Lisa] is pursuing a doctorate in education, and she said watching the panda cam has helped relieve some of the stress. In the past year, she said, she has visited all four U.S. zoos with giant pandas as well as one in Canada.

“It’s a better way to relax than drinking,” Washam said. “It’s very peaceful.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchUrban/City Life and Issues* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted January 18, 2014 at 11:05 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Cannonball jellyfish are bland at best. In China, where slivered, dry jellyfish are commonly served before banquets and strewn across salads, cooks don't use the cellophane-like strips without first dousing them in soy sauce or sesame oil.

Tabasco works too, said University of Georgia food safety professor Yao-Wen Huang, who in the 1980s earned the nickname "Cannonball King" for his work developing a jellyfish processing system.

According to Huang, the allure of jellyfish is its distinctive texture, suggestive of a cross between a potato chip and a stretched-out rubber band. "We call it crunchy-crispy," said Huang. "It's like when you eat chitterlings, you're not really hungry that you want food. You want that mouthfeel."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchScience & Technology* Economics, PoliticsEconomyConsumer/consumer spendingCorporations/Corporate LifeEnergy, Natural Resources* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted January 13, 2014 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Enjoy it all (hat tip: BC).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryCanada

0 Comments
Posted January 10, 2014 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

An East Tennessee serpent-handling pastor’s legal woes are over for now.

After a hearing on Wednesday (January 8), a grand jury decided not to indict the Rev. Andrew Hamblin on charges of violating a state ban on possessing venomous snakes.

In November, state officials seized 53 serpents — including rattlesnakes, copperheads, and exotic breeds — from the Tabernacle Church of God in LaFollette, Tenn., where Hamblin is pastor.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHealth & MedicineLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals

3 Comments
Posted January 9, 2014 at 11:20 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Cecil] Williams fainted at the 125th Street platform in Manhattan on Tuesday, and as he tumbled forward, Orlando landed in the tracks alongside him. Orlando tried to rouse Williams, who was unconscious. They lay there as the train passed above them.

Both survived. But because Orlando is slated to retire in January, and Williams' insurance won't pay for a non-working dog, they would have had to part ways.

Now, thanks to several anonymous donations to Guiding Eyes for the Blind, all of Orlando's expenses will be covered.

Read it all (the video is just wonderful as well).

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Culture-WatchCharities/Non-Profit OrganizationsHealth & MedicineUrban/City Life and Issues* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted December 19, 2013 at 3:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The demonstration necropsy at the Charleston Animal Society was one element of a comprehensive program that is attracting attention nationally. The society’s education team developed the Veterinary Science Initiative, which is offered throughout Lowcountry classrooms in an effort to expose students to veterinary science and the shelter’s work.

“There aren’t a lot of resources in shelters, so if you’re going to invest time and money, you better make sure it’s effective and it hits multiple goals,” Tisa said. “The primary focus is getting kids interested in science.”

Read it all from the front page of yesterday's local paper.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchEducationHealth & MedicineScience & TechnologyTeens / Youth* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted December 7, 2013 at 1:10 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

About sunset, it happened every Friday evening on a lonely stretch along the eastern Florida seacoast. You could see an old man walking, white-haired, bushy eye-browed, slightly bent.

One gnarled hand would be gripping the handle of a pail, a large bucket filled with shrimp. There on a broken pier, reddened by the setting sun, the weekly ritual would be re-enacted.

At once, the silent twilight sky would become a mass of dancing dots...growing larger. In the distance, screeching calls would become louder.

They were seagulls, come from nowhere on the same pilgrimage… to meet an old man.

For half an hour or so, the gentleman would stand on the pier, surrounded by fluttering white, till his pail of shrimp was empty. But the gulls would linger for a while. Perhaps one would perch comfortably on the old man’s hat…and a certain day gone by would gently come to his mind.

Eventually, all the old man’s days were past. If the gulls still returned to that spot… perhaps on a Friday evening at sunset, it is not for food… but to pay homage to the secret they shared with a gentle stranger.

And that secret is THE REST OF THE STORY.

Anyone who remembers October of 1942 remembers the day it was reported that Captain Eddie Rickenbacker was lost at sea.

Captain Eddie’s mission had been to deliver a message of the utmost importance to General Douglas MacArthur.

But there was an unexpected detour which would hurl Captain Eddie into the most harrowing adventure of his life. . Somewhere over the South Pacific, the flying fortress became lost beyond the reach of radio. Fuel ran dangerously low, and the men ditched their plane in the ocean.

The B-17 stayed afloat just long enough for all aboard to get out. . Then, slowly, the tail of the flying fortress swung up and poised for a split second… and the ship went down leaving eight men and three rafts… and the horizon.

For nearly a month, Captain Eddie and his companions would fight the water, and the weather, and the scorching sun.

They spent many sleepless nights recoiling as giant sharks rammed their rafts. Their largest raft was nine by five… the biggest shark ten feet long.

But of all their enemies at sea, one proved most formidable: starvation. Eight days out, their rations were long gone or destroyed by the salt water. It would take a miracle to sustain them. And a miracle occurred.

In Captain Eddie’s own words, “Cherry,” that was B-17 pilot, Captain William Cherry, “read the service that afternoon, and we finished with a prayer for deliverance and a hymn of praise. There was some talk, but it tapered off in the oppressive heat. With my hat pulled down over my eyes to keep out some of the glare, I dozed off.”
Now this is still Captain Rickenbacker talking… Something landed on my head. I knew that it was a seagull. I don’t know how I knew; I just knew.
“Everyone else knew, too. No one said a word. But peering out from under my hat brim without moving my head, I could see the expression on their faces. They were staring at the gull. The gull meant food… if I could catch it.”
And the rest, as they say, is history.
Captain Eddie caught the gull. Its flesh was eaten; its intestines were used for bait to catch fish. The survivors were sustained and their hopes renewed because a lone sea gull, uncharacteristically hundreds of miles from land, offered itself as a sacrifice.

You know that Captain Eddie made it.

And now you also know...that he never forgot.
Because every Friday evening, about sunset...on a lonely stretch along the eastern Florida seacoast...you could see an old man walking...white-haired, bushy-eyebrowed, slightly bent.

His bucket filled with shrimp was to feed the gulls...to remember that one which, on a day long past, gave itself without a struggle...like manna in the wilderness.

--Paul Harvey's the Rest of the Story (Bantam Books, 1997 Mass paperback ed. of the 1977 Doubleday original), pp. 170-172

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHistory* Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, Military* General InterestAnimals* TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted November 28, 2013 at 12:32 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

When Xena was rescued, she only had a 1 percent chance of survival. Not only has the dog beaten those odds, but she also has helped an 8-year-old autistic boy find his voice. NBC’s Jill Rappaport reports.

Watch it all from NBC (just under 2 1/4 minutes).

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenHealth & Medicine* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted November 25, 2013 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

ORANGEBURG, SC — A nonprofit Christian ministry is working to improve the lives of young people and adults through a mission that involves a mix of horses and skills training.

Cope couple Dan and Jan White started God It Made Ranch a year ago as the 41st mission station of Columbia-based Christ Central Ministries Inc., which was founded in 1992 by Pastor Jimmy Jones and had a food ministry as its first mission. Women and children’s shelters, men’s shelters, veterans’ transitional housing and clothing distribution are among CCM’s other missions.

“But we’re the first horse ranch. They had been praying for one of these for a very long time. I moved to Lexington where my dad lives a year ago, and that’s how I found Christ Central,” Jan White said. “I started volunteering for the children’s shelter, the women’s shelter and the homeless shelter. They also have a GED program and a rehab center.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchCharities/Non-Profit OrganizationsReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted November 17, 2013 at 1:59 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Absolutely Stunning Dance of the Peacock Spider! from DAFTEK on Vimeo.



Watch it all (Hat tip: Selimah Harmon)

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

0 Comments
Posted November 17, 2013 at 12:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Apparently this has been in the works for a year, without my knowledge (but with everyone else in the family in on it). He was sprung on me as a surprise this past Saturday. I am still recovering. 7 weeks old, his name comes from the Hebrew word for comfort which may be found, for example, in Isaiah 40--KSH.

Filed under: * By KendallHarmon Family* General InterestAnimals

7 Comments
Posted November 13, 2013 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Warrior and Warhorse from The Seventh Movement on Vimeo.

Saratoga Springs, N.Y., famous for its historic racetrack, is among the most idyllic places in America. But on a recent fall weekend, not far from the track, horses were serving a different mission: retired thoroughbreds were recruited to help returning veterans at Song Hill Farm. A group from the US Army 2nd Battalion, 135th infantry, united in grief over the death of a fellow solider, gathered for the first time in five years to be part of Saratoga Warhorse, a three-day program that pairs veterans with horses. Tom Rinaldi reports the emotional story of the veterans, paired with their horses, undergoing a rebirth of trust and taking a first step toward healing.

Watch it all, and, yes, you will likely need kleenex--KSH.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHealth & MedicinePsychology* Economics, PoliticsIraq WarWar in Afghanistan* General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted November 11, 2013 at 3:19 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



To the tune of "Somewhere over the Rainbow," no less, with eagles, an owl, baby bears, and elks galore among many other things. Watch it all--KSH.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchMusic* General InterestAnimals

4 Comments
Posted October 15, 2013 at 7:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The National Geographic Channel followed two snake-handling preachers off and on for a year for a called Snake Salvation that will air this fall on Tuesday nights. Pastor Jamie Coots is one of the series' subjects.

"Snake handling fascinated me because it's such an extreme gesture of faith," says Matthew Testa, the series' executive producer. "We set out to tell this story from the snake handlers' point of view, to really humanize them, not to judge them, and to show how important religion is in their daily lives with their daily struggles."

The Tabernacle Church of God in LaFollette, Tenn., is a short drive through the Cumberland Gap from Coots' church. The pastor here is Andrew Hamblin, a lanky, charismatic 22-year-old, who is the other preacher featured in the TV series. Hamblin wants to modernize the practice of handling snakes in church. He posts photos of himself with snakes on , and he aspires to pastor the first serpent-handling megachurch.

Read or listen to it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchMovies & TelevisionReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.* Religion News & CommentaryOther Churches

8 Comments
Posted October 10, 2013 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

there are 15 slides in all--check them out (and note there is an autoplay slideshow option).

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryParish Ministry* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UKEurope

7 Comments
Posted October 9, 2013 at 6:12 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

When riots broke out in France this summer over the country's prohibition on Muslim veils, many Americans looked on in disbelief. Such a violation of religious liberty would never be tolerated in the United States, a nation founded as a place where victims of religious persecution could worship freely. I once thought the same thing.

That changed in 2008, when I was arrested for observing my faith. My crime? Possessing snakes.

As pastor at the Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name, a Pentecostal church in Middlesboro, Ky., I and my congregants regularly handle venomous snakes such as copperheads and rattlesnakes as part of our services. This might seem strange, but it's no less worthy of legal protection than the more common traditions observed by Jews, Muslims and mainstream Christians. In fact, as members of a small and unpopular religious minority, congregants of serpent-handling churches are precisely the sort of worshipers that the Constitution was designed to protect.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted October 4, 2013 at 11:22 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * By KendallHarmon Family* General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted September 9, 2013 at 7:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsHumor / Trivia

1 Comments
Posted September 8, 2013 at 3:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

As I wonder how it feels to be that mouse, I’m reminded of Thomas Nagel’s famous 1974 essay, “What is it like to be a bat?”—a landmark in the philosophy of mind. Nagel’s thesis was that there is “something that it is like” to undergo particular states of consciousness or being; there is a first-person perspective (for which the technical word is qualia) that will forever elude reductionist explanation. But the inscrutable depths of a laboratory mouse or of his flying cousin are beside the point; what we really want to know is what it is like to be a human being.

Some neuroscientists will tell you that it’s just a matter of time before we possess a complete physicalist map of mental states. I’m certain they are wrong and Nagel is right.

But what is it like to be a human being? The difficulty is that we don’t know which particular experiences specify our humanity; we don’t whether there is some flavor or feel or “pinch of existence” (as William James liked to call it) that goes with being human. Introspection alone can’t answer this question, for our sense of being human is a social acquisition assimilated from our parents, friends and teachers. Faith forms identity: if I accept the religious teaching that I am a creature made by God rather than a man (or laboratory mouse) produced by impersonal mechanisms, it changes everything.

Read it all.


Filed under: * Culture-WatchPsychologyReligion & CultureScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropology

0 Comments
Posted August 27, 2013 at 11:14 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

As school counselor Jennifer VonLintel gears up for the start of the school year at B.F. Kitchen Elementary School, there are new students to enroll, files to update and schedules to plan — including the schedule for Copper, her registered therapy dog and a popular presence in the hallways of the Loveland, Colo., school.

Three days a week, the 3-year-old golden retriever's assignments can include mingling with kids during recess, being assigned to students who struggle with reading or math anxiety, and providing general companionship and support in the classroom, during counseling office visits, and during after-school programs. Any time a friendly, furry face can provide an extra measure of comfort and assurance, says VonLintel.

When there's a death in a family or a child receives bad news, "with the parents' permission, we'll introduce Copper to the situation," she says. "Kids find comfort in petting him, and sometimes the parents do, too. "

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenEducationHealth & MedicinePsychologyStress* General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 17, 2013 at 4:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all (hat tip SH).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted August 9, 2013 at 12:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In the worldwide battle to get dog owners to clean up after their pets, enter Brunete, a middle-class suburb of Madrid fed up with dirty parks and sidewalks.

ome cities hand out steep fines. But in these tough economic times, the mayor here, Borja Gutiérrez, did not much like that idea. Instead, this town engaged a small army of volunteers to bag it, box it and send it back to its owners.

“It’s your dog, it’s your dog poop,” Mr. Gutiérrez said. “We are just returning it to you.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchRural/Town Life* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in GeneralCity Government* General InterestAnimals* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

0 Comments
Posted August 7, 2013 at 12:10 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Wow (hat tip:SH).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted July 15, 2013 at 5:12 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

These photos might cause a double-take. Look closely: These white balls of fur aren't puppies, or lambs, they're lion cubs. And they're adorable. The rare white color is due to a recessive gene.

Seven of the cubs were born in captivity to three South African mama lions since last month.

Read it all and look at all twelve pictures.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAsiaJapan

0 Comments
Posted July 14, 2013 at 5:09 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You see this dog. It was but yesterday
I mused, forgetful of his presence here,
Till thought on thought drew downward tear on tear;
When from the pillow, where wet-cheeked I lay,
A head as hairy as Faunus, thrust its way
Right sudden against my face,--two golden-clear
Large eyes astonished mine,--a drooping ear
Did flap me on either cheek, to dry the spray!
I started first, as some Arcadian
Amazed by goatly god in twilight grove:
But as my bearded vision closelier ran
My tears off, I knew Flush, and rose above
Surprise and sadness; thanking the true Pan,
Who, by low creatures, leads to heights of love.

--Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861)


Filed under: * Culture-WatchPoetry & Literature* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted July 8, 2013 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

“She has not just made this just about her,” said Leslie Richmand, a Plainsboro, N.J., counselor and another of [Patty] Hall’s Shaggy Facebook friends. “Patty is talking to all these people like they are in her living room.”

Hall calls the page a dog diary that she realizes has become something more. Fans have sent her a number of gifts, namely dog toys and books. but Hall also has received a collar with a radio transmitter, a wine glass painted with a portrait of Shaggy and a Mother’s Day card.

“She started off as a dog in distress, and now she has become their friend,” Hall said.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet--Social Networking* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted July 3, 2013 at 6:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all. So encouraging!

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenHealth & MedicineMarriage & Family* General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted June 19, 2013 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all--it will make your whole day. This is the stuff from which the saying truth is better than fiction comes (Hat tip:ML)--KSH.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeSpirituality/Prayer* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimalsNatural Disasters: Earthquakes, Tornadoes, Hurricanes, etc.

1 Comments
Posted June 1, 2013 at 8:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Warrior and Warhorse from The Seventh Movement on Vimeo.

Saratoga Springs, N.Y., famous for its historic racetrack, is among the most idyllic places in America. But on a recent fall weekend, not far from the track, horses were serving a different mission: retired thoroughbreds were recruited to help returning veterans at Song Hill Farm. A group from the US Army 2nd Battalion, 135th infantry, united in grief over the death of a fellow solider, gathered for the first time in five years to be part of Saratoga Warhorse, a three-day program that pairs veterans with horses. Tom Rinaldi reports the emotional story of the veterans, paired with their horses, undergoing a rebirth of trust and taking a first step toward healing.

Watch it all, and, yes, you will likely need kleenex--KSH.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / Funerals* Culture-WatchHealth & MedicinePsychologyStress* Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, Military* General InterestAnimals

3 Comments
Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all. It will brighten your day.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenHealth & MedicineMarriage & FamilyPsychology* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted May 9, 2013 at 5:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Here is the link, it is two parents with the young babies, and it is just fantastic.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchBlogging & the InternetScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted April 29, 2013 at 5:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



One of the most beautiful birds we have in South Carolina, this picture was taken by my friend Francis Allston.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

5 Comments
Posted April 27, 2013 at 7:14 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Yale University is organizing a conference on “Personhood Beyond the Human” for December 6-8, 2013. It will feature, among other proponents of personhood rights for animals, notorious infanticide and bestiality-promoting ethicist Peter Singer.

The conference is co-sponsored by the animal rights group Nonhuman Rights Project and the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, in collaboration with the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics and the Yale Animal Ethics Group.

"The event will focus on personhood for nonhuman animals, including great apes, cetaceans, and elephants, and will explore the evolving notions of personhood by analyzing them through the frameworks of neuroscience, behavioral science, philosophy, ethics, and law,” reads a description of the conference on its website.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchEducationLife EthicsYoung Adults* General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral Theology

2 Comments
Posted April 24, 2013 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

"Saving abandoned animals, one ride at a time..."

Guaranteed to brighten your day--watch it all (Note: video is linked at the top, if no video capacity you can read the story. Make sure to check out the map of how long the ride is from Texas to Tok, Alaska where the dog was delivered).

Also, please note that the website for Operation Roger Operation Roger (a ministry which, as the video notes, was begin through a prayer) is there.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenMarriage & FamilyTravel* General InterestAnimalsNatural Disasters: Earthquakes, Tornadoes, Hurricanes, etc.

0 Comments
Posted April 24, 2013 at 5:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchMusicScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted April 8, 2013 at 4:14 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Of all of the creepy and crawly things that you can think of, tarantulas probably are near the top of the list when it comes to scariness. Well, get ready to add another terrifying arachnid to your list, because a new type of tarantula has been discovered in northern Sri Lanka.

Ranil Nanayakkara, a local researcher, and his team found the tiger spider and named it Poecilotheria rajaei, after a local police investigator, Michael Rajakumar Purajah. Purajah helped the team of scientists navigate the remote area where the spider was found.

Read it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted April 3, 2013 at 2:27 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Courtesy of the really cool Slothville website:

BUCKET OF SLOTHS from Lucy Cooke on Vimeo.

Oh so cute--watch it all; KSH.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

4 Comments
Posted February 20, 2013 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Look at all all of them (Hat tip: Selimah Harmon).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted February 15, 2013 at 7:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I caught this by accident recently and was hypnotized by its beauty. It is simply splendid--on central park, on the seasons, on the birders, and, oh my--on the birds.

You can read more about it here and if you are up for it there is a spectacular bird show there to whet your appetite.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchMovies & Television* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted February 12, 2013 at 4:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted February 3, 2013 at 3:29 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But you don’t believe the dear Lord created it anyway, do you? Hasn’t that got you into trouble with the people who don’t believe in evolution? Not in this country. You get letters but it’s a very easy thing to answer. Someone says: ‘I believe a God of infinite mercy created every single species and the Lord looks after us and all the animals.’ Well, what about that little African boy, five years old, sitting on the banks of a river, and he’s got a worm in his eye that’s going to turn him blind in three years? Did this God that you talk about actually design this worm and say: ‘I’ll put it in this boy’s eye?’ To suggest that God specifically created a worm to torture small African children is blasphemy as far as I can see. The Archbishop of Canterbury doesn’t believe that.

He’s supposed to believe it, though, isn’t he? Absolutely not! If you said to the Archbishop of Canterbury: ‘Are you really telling me that God got some mud, blew in it and made a man and when that man said: “I haven’t got a friend”, he took out one of his ribs, rubbed it in his hands and went “boom, boom”?’ [Rowan] Williams [the last Archbishop of Canterbury] is a highly civilised, educated man. He wouldn’t for a microsecond be so silly as to believe that. But it does put him in an intolerable position.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted January 30, 2013 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all--such fun.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted January 22, 2013 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Would you like to make some extra money, and at the same time run the risk of being eaten by a carnivorous reptile the size of a war canoe? If your answer is “yes,” I have an exciting opportunity for you. It’s called the Python Challenge, and I am not making it up. It’s a real event that was dreamed up by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which apparently was concerned that Florida does not seem insane enough to people in normal states.

The Python Challenge is a month-long contest; its purpose, according to the official website (pythonchallenge.org) is “to raise public awareness about Burmese pythons.” Q. What do they mean by “raise public awareness about?” A. They mean “kill.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsHumor / Trivia

3 Comments
Posted January 14, 2013 at 6:11 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Gear up the handkerchiefs and watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildren* General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted December 22, 2012 at 5:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenMarriage & FamilyRural/Town LifeViolence* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.

0 Comments
Posted December 18, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / Funerals* Culture-WatchChildrenMarriage & Family* General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted December 10, 2012 at 3:56 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

One of nature’s tiniest creatures has brought havoc to one of Charleston’s oldest churches.

Termites have attacked the wood and skeletal support system at Citadel Square Baptist Church, the yellow stucco landmark adjacent to Marion Square.

The damage is so severe that the sanctuary has been closed for the last two years, forcing the tiny congregation to meet in an adjoining 1950s-era chapel.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeLiturgy, Music, Worship* Culture-WatchArchitecture* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted December 10, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Blue whales can grow to 90 feet -- that's longer than a tennis court. Getting that big requires a lot of fuel, says Jeremy Goldbogen, a postdoctoral researcher at the Cascadia Research Collective. That's why Goldbogen studies the whales' dining habits. They feed on krill, slurping in millions of the mini crustaceans along with hundreds of thousands of pounds of water in a single gulp. With the help of data tags and a National Geographic Crittercam, Goldbogen and colleagues found that blue whales do underwater acrobatics while they eat -- specifically a move they coined "the blue whale barrel roll."

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted December 7, 2012 at 4:25 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Americans have a long tradition of pampering and memorializing their pets. Now, technology lets precious friends become precious gems.

The idea of turning the carbon in ashes into man-made diamonds emerged a decade ago as a way to memorialize humans. Today, departed pets are fueling the industry's growth, with a handful of companies selling diamonds, gemstones and other jewelry out of pet remains, including hair and feathers.

Some gems start at about $250, while pet diamonds cost at least $1,400, with prices based on color and size. The diamonds have the same physical properties as mined diamonds, purveyors say.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryDeath / Burial / Funerals* Economics, PoliticsEconomyConsumer/consumer spendingCorporations/Corporate Life* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.

0 Comments
Posted December 7, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenMarriage & Family* General InterestAnimals* South Carolina

3 Comments
Posted December 1, 2012 at 9:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchChildrenHistoryMarriage & Family* Economics, PoliticsTerrorism* General InterestAnimals* TheologyPastoral Theology

1 Comments
Posted November 18, 2012 at 12:18 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

He is just so adorable--check it out.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted November 5, 2012 at 3:19 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

"There is no way this is just some sort of accidental thing, that the elephant was making normal elephant sounds and somehow got rewarded for doing it and then people started saying, 'Oh, he's a talking elephant,' " says [Tecumseh] Fitch. "That's what I think makes it really convincing that this is speech mimicry."

What's more, the researchers asked native Korean speakers to listen to the sounds made by Koshik and transcribe what they heard. While most listeners agreed on the vowel sounds, there was some disagreement on what consonants he was saying. "His consonants are kind of blurry in the same way that mine might be if I'd had a half a bottle of Jack Daniel's or something," says Fitch.

What most struck the researchers is that Koshik was apparently so driven to imitate sounds that he invented the method of putting his trunk in his mouth and moving it around. They believe that he may have done this to bond with his trainers, as he was deprived of elephant companionship during a critical period of his childhood and spent years with humans as his only social contact.

Read or listen to it all and do not miss the video.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted November 4, 2012 at 12:16 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You know I am a mush for these kinds of things but please go and look for yourself.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsNatural Disasters: Earthquakes, Tornadoes, Hurricanes, etc.

0 Comments
Posted November 3, 2012 at 5:53 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all. Not a dry eye in the house here after this one--KSH.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, MilitaryWar in Afghanistan* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted October 26, 2012 at 5:47 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch and listen to it all and you can read a bit more over there.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted October 23, 2012 at 4:25 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This has to be listened to--catch it all.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsPolitics in GeneralState Government* General InterestAnimalsHumor / Trivia

6 Comments
Posted October 17, 2012 at 12:17 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Emma Thompson isn't just an Oscar-winning actress; she's also an Oscar-winning writer. Thompson authored the 1995 film adaptation of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and now she's taken on another period project — reviving the classic children's book character Peter Rabbit.

Beatrix Potter first brought the mischievous bunny to life in 1902 with tales of stealing lettuce and making trouble. Now, Thompson's version takes Peter Rabbit across the Scottish countryside. Not surprisingly, it opens with Peter Rabbit contemplating an adventure in which he's sure to break a lot of rules.

"Peter is sort of anarchistic, which I love," Thompson tells NPR's Renee Montagne....

Listen to it all at the link provided here (a little under 8 minutes).

Filed under: * Culture-WatchBooksChildrenHistory* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted October 13, 2012 at 10:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

These are just so much fun.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted October 7, 2012 at 4:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The black mamba has a fearful reputation, and it’s easy to see why. It can move at around 12.5 miles (20 kilometres) per hour, making it one of the world’s fastest snakes, if not the fastest. Its body can reach 4.5 metres in length, and it can lift a third of that off the ground. That would give you an almost eye-level view of the disturbingly black mouth from which it gets its name. And inside that mouth, two short fangs deliver one of the most potent and fast-acting venoms of any land snake.

Combined with its reputation for aggression (at least when cornered) and you’ve got a big, intimidating, deadly, ornery serpent that can probably outrun you. It’s not the most obvious place to go looking for painkillers.

But among the cocktail of chemicals in the black mamba’s venom, Sylvie Diochot and Anne Baron from the CNRS have found a new class of molecules that can relieve pain as effectively as morphine, and without any toxic side effects. They’ve named them mambalgins.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchHealth & MedicineScience & Technology* General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted October 6, 2012 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Africa is in the midst of an epic elephant slaughter. Conservation groups say poachers are wiping out tens of thousands of elephants a year, more than at any time in the previous two decades, with the underground ivory trade becoming increasingly militarized.

Like blood diamonds from Sierra Leone or plundered minerals from Congo, ivory, it seems, is the latest conflict resource in Africa, dragged out of remote battle zones, easily converted into cash and now fueling conflicts across the continent.

Some of Africa’s most notorious armed groups, including the Lord’s Resistance Army, the Shabab and Darfur’s janjaweed, are hunting down elephants and using the tusks to buy weapons and sustain their mayhem. Organized crime syndicates are linking up with them to move the ivory around the world, exploiting turbulent states, porous borders and corrupt officials from sub-Saharan Africa to China, law enforcement officials say.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsEconomy* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAfricaRepublic of Congo* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

3 Comments
Posted September 7, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We celebrate our workers in this country today. Maybe we should also take a moment to remember those who work for us in uniform in other parts of the world.

Not too long ago, one of those people was Cliff Hartley. He joined the Air Force at the age of 19, and one year ago today, he spent Labor Day walking a dusty road in Afghanistan with his dog, Cir, looking for bombs. They were attached to a SEAL team and their primary duties were to sniff out trouble.

Cir retired from duty last October and now lives with Hartley, who has 10 years in the Air Force and plans to do 10 more. Right now, he’s stateside. His retired military working dog now sleeps at his feet in their North Charleston house, just like he once did in a tent in Afghanistan. There’s one big difference. They both sleep much better now.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, MilitaryEconomyLabor/Labor Unions/Labor MarketWar in Afghanistan* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.* South Carolina

1 Comments
Posted September 3, 2012 at 9:02 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I really enjoyed this--watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryAustralia / NZ

1 Comments
Posted August 30, 2012 at 5:25 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

This is just remarkable--watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals* TheologyAnthropology

0 Comments
Posted August 29, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Check it out--wow.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted August 14, 2012 at 6:47 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There are eleven pictures and eleven quotes--read them all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted August 1, 2012 at 6:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Watch it all--great stuff from ABC's Nightline

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

1 Comments
Posted July 14, 2012 at 10:08 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * By KendallHarmon Family* General InterestAnimals

7 Comments
Posted July 12, 2012 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * By KendallHarmon Family* General InterestAnimals

10 Comments
Posted June 22, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Watch it all.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsEnergy, Natural Resources* General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted June 21, 2012 at 4:38 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all--hilarious (note the "skip the ad" option at the beginning).

Filed under: * General InterestAnimalsHumor / Trivia

0 Comments
Posted June 12, 2012 at 12:22 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * Culture-WatchSports* General InterestAnimals

2 Comments
Posted May 19, 2012 at 5:58 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon



Filed under: * By KendallHarmon Family* General InterestAnimals

10 Comments
Posted May 19, 2012 at 10:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all--wonderful, joyful stuff.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchMovies & Television* General InterestAnimals* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted May 14, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Watch it all.

Filed under: * General InterestAnimals

0 Comments
Posted May 3, 2012 at 5:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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