Posted by Kendall Harmon

Prime Minister Gordon Brown is pedaling smartly back on his proposal for a financial transactions tax or 'Tobin Tax' after his surprise presentation, delivered at a Group of 20 finance meeting in Scotland, was met with a chorus of criticism over the weekend.

It is believed that Brown's handling of the issue provoked renewed dispute with the Treasury. Chancellor Alistair Darling is said to be frustrated by the prime minister’s promotion of a plan he already knew would be publicly shot down by the US.

The American rejection of the proposal - "A day-by-day financial transactions tax is not something we are prepared to support," said US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner (above, with Alistair Darling) - was followed by rejections from Canada, Russia, the International Monetary Fund and the European Central Bank.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsEconomyG20 Finance and CB Ministers, Saint Andrews, Scotland, November 2009Stock MarketThe Credit Freeze Crisis of Fall 2008/The Recession of 2007--The U.S. GovernmentTreasury Secretary Timothy GeithnerPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

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Posted November 9, 2009 at 7:23 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

He comes out solidly against the dumb transaction tax idea. Well worth the time. Watch it all (about 6 1/3 minutes)--KSH.

Filed under: * Economics, PoliticsEconomyG20 Finance and CB Ministers, Saint Andrews, Scotland, November 2009Stock MarketTaxesThe Banking System/SectorThe Credit Freeze Crisis of Fall 2008/The Recession of 2007--

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Posted November 7, 2009 at 7:11 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The United States and Britain voiced disagreement Saturday over a proposal that would impose a new tax on financial transactions to support future bank rescues.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown of Britain, leading a meeting here of finance ministers from the Group of 20 rich and developing countries, said such a tax on banks should be considered as a way to take the burden off taxpayers during periods of financial crisis. His comments pre-empted the International Monetary Fund, which is set to present a range of options next spring to ensure financial stability.

But the proposal was met with little enthusiasm by the United States Treasury secretary, Timothy F. Geithner, who told Sky News in an interview that he would not support a tax on everyday financial transactions.

What a disappointment Gorden Brown is turning out to be. This is a very bad idea that he has come out behind, and his timing could not be worse. Fortunately, even the Russian finance minister spoke against it. In any event, read it all--KSH.



Filed under: * Culture-WatchGlobalization* Economics, PoliticsEconomyG20 Finance and CB Ministers, Saint Andrews, Scotland, November 2009Stock MarketTaxesThe U.S. GovernmentTreasury Secretary Timothy Geithner

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Posted November 7, 2009 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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