Posted by The_Elves

Presentation narrated by Robert Lundy of the AAC


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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted July 22, 2014 at 8:31 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

CofE: Sympathy for the Devil
Legal Hobby with AS Haley


With thanks to Anglican TV

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted July 11, 2014 at 11:44 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But the oath of conformity was not the chief oath made in the ordination process, as I also explained in that post. Ever since 1550, every Anglican/Episcopal ordinand on both sides of the Atlantic has vowed "to minister the Doctrine and Sacraments, and the Discipline of CHRIST, as the LORD hath commanded, and as this Church ... hath received the same, according to the commandments of GOD", or words to the same effect. (The current version has it this way: "Will you be loyal to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of Christ as this Church has received them?")

Now, then, let us return to Canon Harris' question. As he himself appears to recognize, Mark Lawrence eventually was forced, by the course of events leading toward same-sex marriage in ECUSA, to choose between "the doctrine, discipline, and worship of this Church" and "the doctrine, discipline, and worship of Christ as this Church has received it" (my bold emphasis).


Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South Carolina* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch History* South Carolina* TheologyEcclesiology

1 Comments
Posted July 9, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

‘They have healed the wound of my people lightly, saying, ‘Peace, peace,’when there is no peace.’
Jeremiah 8:11

taking the Lambeth Conference of 1998 as my starting point, the aim of these three lectures will be to survey the contours of two very different Anglican ecclesiologies as they have emerged out of this recent history. One is what I think we can most accurately describe as conversational ecclesiology; the other is the recovery of a confessional ecclesiology.

Read it all, and all three lectures may be found here

Over the past thirty years or so, the homosexual agenda has been the point of leverage for a profound change in Western culture that in my view has been the final tipping point from a Christian to a post-­‐Christian culture and these changes have powerfully shaped the Anglican Churches of the West which have, in their different ways, been accustomed to articulating a mainstream morality. The Lambeth Conference of 1998 marks the point at which those secularising pressures were decisively manifested and this is where my analysis of contemporary Anglicanism begins.

The story of the Anglican Communion since then can only be understood if we recognise it as the relentless effort of revisionists to undermine the collegial mind of the Communion, expressed by the overwhelming majority of its bishops at the Lambeth Conference of 1998.

They reaffirmed the biblical understanding of sexuality positively and negatively, affirming that the Conference ‘upholds faithfulness in marriage between a man and a woman in lifelong union, and believes that abstinence is right for those who are not called to marriage’ and also ‘rejecting homosexual practice as incompatible with Scripture’.

At stake here was not just an aspect of sexual ethics, but also primary questions of the authority of Scripture and human identity. But rather than settling the issue, Lambeth 1998 simply became the trigger for sustained conflict.
........
So taking the Lambeth Conference of 1998 as my starting point, the aim of these three lectures will be to survey the contours of two very different Anglican ecclesiologies as they have emerged out of this recent history. One is what I think we can most accurately describe as conversational ecclesiology; the other is the recovery of a confessional ecclesiology.

Read it all, and all three lectures may be found here

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary* AdminFeatured (Sticky)

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Posted June 25, 2014 at 7:03 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

During our time together, I was approached by a number of clergy who had been reading some of the blogs which are deeply critical of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). They came to me with this question: “Will we survive?” Their concern, even anxiety, has to do with the season of transition that is upon us as we prepare for the Provincial Assembly in June and the election of a new Archbishop.

And it was an epiphany to be able to realize, with them, that the same heart and skill set we have been seeking to impart to them as “change leaders” in their local churches – the very same principles – apply exactly to the transitions we are facing in the ACNA:
- Staying focused on Jesus and his Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20).
- Clear line of sight from the present reality to the God-given vision of “What God wants to do through my church in this community at this time.”
- Not personalizing inevitable resistances and conflicts but staying calm and maintaining a non-anxious presence.
- Above all, leading as Jesus would if he were in my shoes.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet* Theology

2 Comments
Posted June 2, 2014 at 7:25 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The topics include:

00:00 Blame the Africans
11:07 Anglicans not swimming Tiber's
16:42 The IRS and you
26:06 Radical Islam want's you dead.

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary- Anglican: Latest News

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Posted April 27, 2014 at 1:16 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Declaring GAFCON an “Instrument of Unity” is a critique of the failure of the existing Instruments of Unity” to hold the Communion together in the face of unilateral revisions of faith and practice by Anglican churches in the west (by this I mean the failure in the last ten years of the office of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lambeth Conference of Bishops, and Primates gatherings and the Anglican Consultative Council). This is not news. Even Archbishop Justin Welby acknowledged from the pulpit at All Saints Cathedral in Nairobi, the day before GAFCON 2013 began, that the Instruments of unity had failed.

But the declaration that GAFCON is now an Instrument of Unity also stands for a very positive affirmation and recovery of something lost to Anglicanism. It is the assertion that Anglicans need not wallow in the “deficit of authority” that has paralayzed the current Anglican leadership in the face of un-Biblical teaching and moral practices. It is the assertion– and the beginning of the manifestation– of a recovery of genuine conciliar governance that we find as far back as Acts 15 and the earliest ecumenical councils of the undivided church.

What do I mean by “conciliar governance”? Quite simply, it is the way of governing the church that we find in Acts 15, where leaders from every quarter and every order of the church met to worship, pray, address serious theological and missiological issues (must gentiles be circumcised in order to become followers of Jesus Christ), and reach a consensus on the basis of Scripture, apostolic witness and the Holy Spirit.

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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Analysis- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013GAFCON I 2008* Theology

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Posted April 24, 2014 at 4:10 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

00:00 The Pope a year in review
10:00 Global South adopts Diocese of South Carolina
18:10 ABC Canterbury year in review with Peter Ould
29:11 Why would anybody bring charges against Saint Schori?
38:14 R.I.P Terry Fullam
45:57 Closing and Bloopers

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & Primates* Culture-WatchGlobalization* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesRoman CatholicPope Francis * South Carolina

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Posted March 24, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon


Well, you could knock me down with a feather duster. The Pope is looking into the subject of gay marriage. According to Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Holy Father said to him that "rather than quickly condemn them, let's just ask the questions as to why that has appealed to certain people". OK, it's hardly a new Vatican policy. But language matters. And in the week of the first anniversary of Francis's appointment as pope, it is worth recognising how far the language has come.

But things are going to change even faster for the Church of England over the next few weeks. With gay marriage becoming a legal reality on 29 March, it is certain that a number of clergy will be looking to get hitched, in direct defiance of the wishes of their bishops who have vaguely warned of disciplinary action if they do. But the truth is that the bishops can actually do very little about it. The following is slightly nerdish stuff, but for the likes of north London vicar Reverend Andrew Cain, now preparing for his nuptials, it is crucial. Writing on my Facebook page last night, the Bishop of Buckingham explained the clergy discipline measure:

"Its Section 7 lays down that matters of doctrine and worship are not justiciable under the measure, but must be tried under the Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Measure 1963. Insomniacs may remember that around 10 years ago there was a proposal to have a Clergy Discipline Measure type measure for doctrine and worship cases but it failed. The legal trail leads from here to section 39 of the EJM63. The maximum penalty it lays down for a first offence is a rude letter telling you not to do it again – which hopefully people getting married won't."

Of course, the bishops could pretend that clergy getting married is not a matter of doctrine, but this would be a bit of a problem given that they have been going round telling everyone that it is.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilySexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* TheologyAnthropologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

7 Comments
Posted March 11, 2014 at 7:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

about developments in the Diocese of Grafton in Australia


Watch it all.

David Ould's related article
Membership of the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion
ACL Statement
60 Theses on Real Integrity
Tweet


Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted March 9, 2014 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

I’m realizing that the call to live a holy life, just as Jesus lived, is precisely what is at stake in the great conflicts within our Anglican realignment. Whether we are talking about church growth, church litigation, the promotion of varieties of sexual practice and expression outside of lifelong marriage between a man and a woman, or the crisis of false teaching within the global Anglican Communion, we find common in all these conflicts the challenge of the Bible to live a quality of life that Paul describes in those verses above from Romans 6. We call it holiness of life– and it is quite simply living our lives with the same holy commitment to God and his purposes that Jesus lived.

In his commentary on Romans, John Stott poses the question “Have we never caught ourselves making light of our failures on the ground that God will excuse and forgive them?” I certainly have: how about you? Stott goes on to lay out the argument in Romans 6 that Paul makes regarding why we have no freedom to do so:

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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted March 2, 2014 at 1:10 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

The Gospel holds up a mirror to culture – it affirms but also judges, refines and purifies. This is especially true in certain key areas, for example tempering the instinct to solve problems through violence, instilling a sense of value for all human beings, especially the most vulnerable, and bringing order to sexual impulses. The narrative of the Old Testament shows this: God making his will known in relationship with his obedient people, whether Noah, Abraham or Moses and Israel is contrasted with the sin of the surrounding peoples. Conversely as the people of God turn away from his Word, society returns to its primal state with dangerous characteristics: sexual immorality, reduction in care for the vulnerable, violence, and occult religion. So those who would like African countries to get rid of biblical Christianity on the grounds that it might make the continent safer for gay people, should be careful what they wish for...

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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted February 26, 2014 at 7:37 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

It would be pure cheek for me, as a Quaker, to comment on the substance of an internal matter for Church of England but I am not convinced that the statement by House of Bishops “is in error”. The extract quoted by Professor Woodhead is about what it says it’s about: “the general understanding and definition of marriage in England as enshrined in law”; Archbishop Davidson, however, was commenting on “the law of the State” in relation to whom one could legally marry, not on the definition of marriage itself.

The Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act 1907 did not change the definition of marriage: what it did do was to remove a particular bar in the Table of Kindred and Affinity. Nor did it have anything to do with the indissolubility of marriage as such because, by definition, the man whose wife had died was free to remarry someone: the issue was whether or not he could marry his wife’s sister.

Read it all and take the time to read through the comments.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchHistoryLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & Family* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK* TheologyEthics / Moral Theology

5 Comments
Posted February 24, 2014 at 3:50 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Roger Scruton is possibly the most important conservative philosopher alive today. His book Our Church: A Personal History of the Church of England, is a must read, but then again, I say that about everything he writes. The man wrote an entire book on faces – yes, faces – and changed the way I look at the world....Anglicans Alister McGrath and John Lennox are well known for their apologetics and for going toe to toe with Richard Dawkins and the New Atheists. If you are restless and reformed you have probably heard the names of men like N.T. Wright and J.I. Packer, and if you really like to read, you may have heard of the political theologian Oliver O’Donovan.

So while many others and myself continue to lament the squishiness of Canterbury and the apostasy of the Episcopal Church, remember that reports of the Church’s death are greatly exaggerated.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted February 15, 2014 at 1:40 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Among the topics covered are the Noodle Wars and Bishops of the Jersey Shore. Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary- Anglican: Latest News

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Posted February 4, 2014 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Why do I think College of Bishops have made the right decision? Well, most obviously because their response to Pilling is exactly the one I said in November was needed. The reason for this is more and more evident in public responses, particularly on social media, from all sides of the debate.

On the one hand, many ‘conservatives’ say that there is nothing to be done, and no need any further discussion. I don’t think this takes into account sufficiently the need for the Church of England to develop more credible pastoral response, taking into account what Justin Welby described as the revolution in attitudes within society on this issue.

On the other hand, many ‘revisionists’ agree there is no need for further discussion, but for exactly the opposite reason. It is clear what God is doing in society, and the Church needs to catch up without any further delay. You can see this very clearly in the fulminating responses to yesterday’s announcement on the Thinking Anglicans website (was there ever more irony in a website name?).

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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Theology

4 Comments
Posted January 30, 2014 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

On one hand, it's disappointing both to conservatives and liberals that the Bishops can only state the obvious – that people are divided over the issue of homosexuality – and cannot give any clear lead on what the church should be teaching. On the other hand, it is encouraging that the diversity is recognized; that capitulation to Western cultural norms is not seen as inevitable; that the viewpoint of majority global Anglicanism is taken into account, and above all, that
the Church of England’s pastoral and liturgical practice remains unchanged during this process of facilitated conversation…No change to the Church of England's teaching on marriage is proposed or envisaged.

This presumably means that Pilling’s most contentious proposal, namely that blessings of gay couples in church should commence at the same time as facilitated conversations, has been decisively rejected. It also appears not to leave the door ajar for the acceptance of gay marriage.

There was fear among conservatives that those of their number among the Bishops would be marginalized, especially in the wake of the Bishop of Fulham’s endorsement of Pilling. However it seems clear that some kind of stand - which may have been costly – must have been made to ensure a collegiate pulling back from the brink. For that we can be grateful.

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Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Theology

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Posted January 30, 2014 at 6:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

...there is no denying that GAFCON has come a long way in a short time. The improvised character of GAFCON I has gone and in its place has come a much more sophisticated and responsible organisation. No other group of Anglicans could stage an event with as broad a participation, and that alone ought to persuade people to take it seriously.

Unfortunately, things do not work like that in the real Anglican world. The archbishop of Canterbury could not attend but he was good enough to find time in his diary to make a quick trip to Kenya just before it opened, and to send greetings to it on a video that was played to the assembled delegates. He meant well, and those who met him testified to the warm relations that they had with him. Unfortunately everything he said and did betrayed the fact that the English church establishment had been outflanked and had effectively missed the bus. The official communiqué from Lambeth Palace stated that the main reason for the archbishop’s visit to Kenya was to express solidarity with the victims of the Westgate Shopping Centre atrocity the previous month, but laudable though sympathy for them was, it was an implausible excuse. The archbishop did not rush off to Peshawar to show his support for Christian victims of Muslim terrorism in Pakistan, nor would anyone have expected him to.

Unless of course, GAFCON had been meeting there at the same time…In the end things got so bad that Lambeth Palace was citing the baptism of Prince George as a reason for the archbishop’s non-attendance, as if the royal family would not have been willing to find a more convenient date for the ceremony. The impression left is one of incompetence and dysfunctionality in which almost any excuse to downplay the significance of GAFCON has been eagerly seized on and exploited for far more than it is worth.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Justin WelbyGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* Theology

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Posted January 15, 2014 at 6:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves


With thanks to Kevin Kallsen and George Conger at Anglican TV
"00:00 2013 year in review
13:47 Our 2014 Predictions
22:14 Conversation with Archbishop Duncan
42:04 AS Haley on how to sue yourself
52:31 Closing and Bloopers"


Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted January 13, 2014 at 9:58 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

What on earth is wrong with 'Christ crucified'? Does the phrase no longer resonate in the minds of the un-churched? Is it not a matter of general historical knowledge that Jesus died on as cross? Is it not generally known that this is what the Church believes? It must be the ultimate irony in liturgical development that the Church of England becomes ashamed of the exhortation not to be ashamed to confess the faith of Christ crucified.
But we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumblingblock, and unto the Greeks foolishness; (1 Cor 1:23)

Saint Paul goes to the very heart of the gospel with this phrase. One is left in no doubt that Christ crucified is the very nexus - quite literally crucial - to the plan of salvation. We must preach Christ and him crucified, not just the man, for His death and resurrection are the beginning, middle and end of our redemption. Christ crucified is offensive; it is indeed a stumblingblock; it is undoubtedly foolishness to those who are being lost. But we do not help them by purging it from liturgy and trying to express it in "culturally appropriate and accessible language".

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Analysis- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* TheologyChristologySacramental TheologyBaptism

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Posted January 8, 2014 at 3:15 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Anglican Unscripted is the only video newscast in the Anglican Church. Every Week Kevin, George, Allan and Peter bring you news and prospective from around the globe.

Show Index:
00:00 Anglicans have lost the Mother Church
14:38 Piling onto Pilling Report with Peter Ould
33:14 IRS and Clergy Housing Allowances with AS Haley
41:51 The National Museum in Washington DC
48:37 Closing and Bloopers
Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary- Anglican: Latest NewsAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Sexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesReligion & Culture* Economics, PoliticsEconomyTaxes

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Posted December 6, 2013 at 5:16 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

My first reaction to seeing the Pilling Report was disbelief that in the twenty first century any church could put out a report on human sexuality written by a group that appears to have consisted of 8 men and 2 women and expect it to be taken as a serious contribution to the subject....

The notion that marriage is the only way that sexually active people express themselves is surely just one of many strands in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, aimed at the ability to control knowledge of the paternity of children. Its predominance has come about in cultural settings and for cultural reasons that do not always have a great deal to do with faith or with the teachings of Jesus or interpretation of the whole spectrum of biblical, rabbinic and apocryphal texts.

The report, then, is interesting for two reasons. It is the first time that such a report by a Church of England working party contains an open acknowledgement that, where there is a massive shift in social perception such that a practice or set of practices that were previously not acceptable have come to be seen not only as acceptable, but as desirable, then this can leave the church with a problem if it does not listen and engage.


Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE BishopsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

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Posted November 30, 2013 at 2:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

However, it was his comments about youth work that caught the imagination of the British press.

“As I look at the church today the most urgent and worrying gap is in young peoples work. So many churches have no ministry to young people and that means they have no interest in the future. As I have repeated many times in the past ‘we are one generation away from extinction’. We have to give cogent reasons to young people why the Christian faith is relevant to them,” the archbishop said.

Ignoring Lord Carey’s principle points The Times, Daily Mirror, Independent, Daily Telegraph, Daily Express, and Daily Mail focused on his assertion that “[t]he Church of England could be one generation away from extinction.” Just about all of the press reports and commentary misconstrued what Lord Carey was trying to say. Renewal, growth, evangelism -- even optimism -- was at the heart of the archbishop's Shropshire speech, not doom and gloom.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchMediaReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

4 Comments
Posted November 22, 2013 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Actions of General Convention and the presiding bishop have led us to conclude, along with a growing number of other parishes across the nation, that the direction of TEC is incompatible with historic Christian faith and practice. So today we face litigation that could potentially decimate our corporate life and witness. It’s hard to imagine that the body we helped form some 224 years ago would resort to the secular law courts to take all this away from us; but it’s true.

Let’s step up to this challenge together, and by God’s grace see a victory for the things we hold most dear. Ponder these facts:

We are not going against Scripture by using the secular courts. Paul himself appealed to Roman courts when the Gospel he preached was at stake.
Our team of lawyers says that this case is winnable. Recent legal wins in Texas and Illinois encourage us.
Our parish continues to grow, especially in generous giving. This year it will mean a stretch for each of us.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Conflicts* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryStewardship* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues* South Carolina* Theology

0 Comments
Posted October 30, 2013 at 5:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Jake Belder ‏@jakebelder
A big thank you to the #gafcon2013 delegates! All of us confessing Anglicans are grateful for your faithfulness and your work this past week [This elf seconds this tweet!]

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
After the #GAFCON2013 statement was read and received, I got a high five and an enormous hug from Archbishop Ben... http://fb.me/SKpw7I9Z

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
#gafcon2013 "You have been on the Mount of Transfiguration. It is time to return to your homes and the... http://fb.me/2RuhYK8Hy

David Martin Hanke ‏@dmhanke
'Lift high the cross!' Closing Eucharist. #gafcon2013 http://instagram.com/p/f7XvvUlhcD/

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Closing with Stand Up For Jesus #GAFCon2013

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
++Wabukala thanked the Kenyan police force by giving them a bible... this will never happen in the West. #GAFCON2013 pic.twitter.com/n1CuZVeAks

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
The Police are presented with a new Bible by AB Wabukala in thanks for helping 2 keep us safe. #gafcon2013 "Now go read it to your friends!"

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
PFJ [Abp. Peter Jensen] gets a standing ovation. Now Martyn Minns too. #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/774vwESs0p

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
Lots of thanks. Especially to the Kenyan church who have cared for us and bolstered security with government help. #gafcon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
Thunderous applause. Standing ovation. Spontaneous singing. PFJ crying. Statement has an impact! #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/91NqfjIN0F

Helmut Paul Wambi ‏@wambipaul
@gafconference it has been a success here in Nairobi. #gafcon2013

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
After the final Nairobi Communique was read out, there was a standing ovation and singing broke out. #GAFCON2013 pic.twitter.com/447VxPpRcN

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
Dr Senyonyi x2 [John & Ruth] come forward to read the GAFCON 2013: The Nairobi Communique. #gafcon2013 This will be a moving moment.

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
There's been too much caution. Anglican caution has brought us to today! Bishop of Recife, Brazil #gafcon2013

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey
The armor of God is the gospel. #GAFCON2013 #eph6 #ArmorofGod

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey
"Everything starts with prayer. And ends with prayer." Bp Miguel Uchoa. #gafcon2013

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Key moments and decision moments are prayer moments - Bp Ochoa #GAFCon2013 #Preach

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
+Ochoa: Be strong in the Lord (Eph 6:10). Don't depend on yourself. Don't even try. #GAFCON2013 pic.twitter.com/UY0Ug8T1uW

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Say to the Lord, "Let me never walk in my presumption" - Bp Ochoa #GAFCon2013 #BoldPrayer

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Each challenge we face, no matter how big, has our God who is much bigger - Bp Ochoa #GAFCon2013 #Eph6 #Truth

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Don't even try to live a Godly life on your own. Depending on the Lord means less of you more of Him - Bp Ochoa #GAFCon2013 #Eph6

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
The All Saints children's choir blessing our socks off w In Christ Alone #GAFCon2013… http://instagram.com/p/f7HWqFl3rW/

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey
Gafcon is a movement. So we must move ahead. Bp Miguel Uchoa of Recife. #gafcon2013

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
Our beloved #ANiC bishops at #GAFCON2013. pic.twitter.com/CNDABq8G3h

Zane Elliott ‏@squeakycog
Hallelujah thine the glory, hallelujah amen, hallelujah thine the glory, revive us again. The cry of #gafcon2013 the heart of #Anglicans

gillian davidson ‏@gfdavo
Final church service of #gafcon2013 a time of personal and corporate repentance.

gillian davidson ‏@gfdavo
Bp Kanuku, Kenya on Eph 6 urging #gafcon2013 to humbly, in repentance put on the breastplate of God and face the fight that confronts us.

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
Last day of #gafcon2013 and my body has just about had it! The spirit is willing - but the flesh is weak.

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Yesterday my Rwandan sister, Vivian, told me I dance like an African! #Yessss #Arrived #GAFCon2013 @ThornhillMA @grod125

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference
Thankful to All Saints Cathedral and ACK for gracious hospitality and Christ-like love to #gafcon2013 delegates #anglican

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet--Social Networking

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Posted October 26, 2013 at 10:23 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

(in reverse chronological order, from most recent to earliest)

David Ould ‏@davidould
Africa; it's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you. #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
last night in Nairobi. Will be very sad to leave this country where we have been so wonderfully looked after #gafcon2013

Sam Allberry ‏@SamAllberry
The Kenyans should lead the singing at all Christian conferences. It's been a wonderful week! #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
Hearing from the sole #gafcon2013 Pakistani delegate about how they Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus. #thestrifewillnotbelong

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
More communique: Fort Worth: affirm Anglo-Catholics. Quincy: mention Eucharist alongside Gospel as unifying #Anglican

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
More N. Amer. #GAFCON2013 communique suggestions: change evangelizing West to "areas where Gospel has been obscured." #Anglican

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
Suggestions for #GAFCON2013 communique heard in North American discussion group: more on sanctity of life, unborn. #Anglican

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
"Integrity & authority of Gospel is fundamental. Go wrong with them, everything will go wrong in the end." -Archbp Peter Jensen #GAFCON2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
Served as secretary of @The_ACNA caucus here at #GAFCON2013. Working out the final communique in working groups organized by Province.

Moses Kimani ‏@SirMosesKimani
Listening to the amazingly good Nairobi Communique of the #GAFCON2013 Conference at All Saints Cathedral. Applause! Applause! Applause!

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
John Guernsey+ just read out the draft of the Nairobi Communique. It was very well written and exceeded my expectations. #GAFCON2013


ACNA ‏@The_ACNA
Bishop John Guernsey of @The_ACNA serves as Chairman of Communique Team at #GAFCON2013 https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BXa18BECAAAakgI.jpg:large … #Anglican #Episcopal #GAFCON

Mel Lacy ‏@lacymel
Significant afternoon for all those at #gafcon2013 as we consider the draft Nairobi communique in our provinces pic.twitter.com/jAZKlpTyGX

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Our task is not to recreate the Jerusalem statement, our task is to put our shoulder to the wheel to move the GFCA forward #GAFCon2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
In Nairobi - is it possible to feel like coming home to a place I have never been before? #GAFCON2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
The most important moment of #gafcon2013 has arrived. @ All Saints Cathedral http://instagram.com/p/f42sQuKA6k/

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Thanks to John Thorpe for a great session on Teaching Others to Teach the Bible #ChildrenAndYouthTrack #GAFCon2013

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
@lacymel Train your leaders, Teach Bible study skills, Disciple them, Be culturally aware, PRAY #GAFCON2013 #ChildrenAndYouthTrack

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
@lacymel Teach the Word, Build Christian worldview, Support parental discipleship, Live out the Word, Teach signif. of Church #GAFCon2013

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Great session yesterday by @lacymel on discipling vibrant young people who follow Christ #GAFCon2013 #ChildrenAndYouthTrack

David Martin Hanke ‏@dmhanke
I really enjoyed visiting with the delegation from Myanmar this morning. #restorationva #gafcon2013 http://instagram.com/p/f4sa1dFhfk/

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
Canon Jack at a Tweetup over tea during #GAFCON2013 of social media folks from America, Australia and England. http://fb.me/2NFzEdSYZ

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
Islam changes wrld by power gain, Chrstns change wrld by willingness to give up power -Bishop Nazir-Ali http://bit.ly/18ibbVj #gafcon2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
“Christ's cosmic victory erupts in visible expression in the local assembly." Rev. William Taylor #gafcon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
When headship and submission are on display in marriage, so is the cosmic victory of God in Jesus Christ. #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
Marriage mirrors the gospel to the world - Willy Taylor #ephesians5 #gafcon2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
"The western church, at best, has been asleep. At worst, has been deceived." Rev. William Taylor #gafcon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
If you sleep walk into partnership with those who court the world, you'll be eaten alive by a crocodile. #gafcon2013 William Taylor on fire.

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Rev Taylor thanking our brothers and sisters in the global south for "staying awake" #GAFCon2013 #Eph5 # Blamo

David Ould ‏@davidould
Biblical truth means we cannot be partners with those who deny it and use deceptive words Eph. 5:6-7 Willy Taylor #gafcon2013

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Submission to one another is part of bringing all things under the lordship of Christ - W Taylor #GAFCon2013 #Eph5

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
Today we'll get a look at the draft GAFCON II statement. This is a pinnacle moment. Will it give us a direction to go together? #gafcon2013

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
Ain't no worship like African worship! So grateful for the joyful fervour that our brothers and sisters bring to our Communion #GAFCon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
Picture simply can't do justice to the joyful music and dancing at #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/dqaaG58Lz1

David Martin Hanke ‏@dmhanke
Good morning! Afayo! (He is Lord!) #gafcon2013 http://instagram.com/p/f4OFSGFhcA/

Sam Allberry ‏@SamAllberry
Next time someone tells you liturgy = dry, send them to All Saints Cathedral in Nairobi. #gafcon2013

***
Note: there were extremely few tweets from Day 4, so we did not do a roundup of Day 4 tweets. Perhaps there were wifi problems...

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet--Social Networking

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Posted October 25, 2013 at 3:40 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Selected Tweets from the #GAFCON2013 feed - October 21, 2013 (also some tweets from #GAFCON, and #GAFCON13)

Louisa Pfitzner ‏@louisapf 21 Oct
Fascinating arvo on East African revival. Key themes centrality of Christ, public repentance, making restitution #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
Revival does not begin with a church. Revival begins with submission and repentance to Christ. "Revival begins with you!" #gafcon13

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton 21 Oct
Bible precious & true: we take away foundation of Christian life when we undermine biblical authority. J. Senyonyi #gafcon #anglican

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
When theology begins to undermine the authority of the scriptures, the theology has gone bad. - Dr John Senyonyi #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
Big theme of East African revival is true repentance. Putting past sins aside & right. Men went & paid back those they stole from. #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
Rev Dr Alfred Olwa addresses #gafcon13 about the East African revival. 1930s to today!!

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather 21 Oct
@gafconference The Gospel transforms or it is no gospel - Archbishop Jensen #GAFCon2013 #preach

AnglicanGeeks ‏@AnglicanGeeks 21 Oct
#GAFCON gathers #Anglicans from across the globe to build friendships and share ministry of reaching out in our broken world. #GAFCON2013

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann 21 Oct
Some stats : 2008 GAFCON @ Jerusalem - 19 provinces, 1138 delegates
2013 GAFCON @ Nairobi - 27 provinces, 1352 delegates

David Ould ‏@davidould 21 Oct
Jensen doing the roll call of nations! #GAFCON13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
Who is here. People from: Argentina, Bermuda, brazil, Burundi, Canada, chile, Congo DR, Fiji, France, Gambia, India, Iran, Ireland #gafcon13
Israel, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar, Namibia, NZ, Nigeria, USA, Pakistan, Paraguay, PNG, Rwanda, Seychelles, #gafcon13
Singapore, South Africa, sth Sudan, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Tanzania, Uganda, uk, Zambia, Australia, Mexico, Germany Sierra Leone #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 21 Oct
Just heard there will be more than 400 Nigerian delegates here. Incredible. #gafcon13

Karen Stevenson ‏@loubaker 21 Oct
Worship with a taste of heaven, all nations..well at least 38 in this worship. Jesus you get the glory #GAFCON2013 @gafconference

Karen Stevenson ‏@loubaker 21 Oct
So it was amazing....in a matter of hours we now have friends in 10 new countries. #GAFCON2013 @gafconference

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey 21 Oct
Revival doesn't start in the church. Revival starts in the individual. #gafcon2013

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference 21 Oct
"Repentance leads to revival" - #gafcon2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog 21 Oct
Singing "Revive Us Again" with 1,300+ Anglicans from all over the world at #GAFCON2013 in Nairobi. Such a powerful moment.

Porterbrook ‏@Porterbrook 21 Oct
Everyday radical discipleship is firmly at the heart of the agenda for #gafcon2013- walking in the death and resurrection of Christ.

Porterbrook ‏@Porterbrook 21 Oct
Being challenged and refreshed by African bishops passionately exhorting #gafcon2013 to say "not I but Christ" what ever the cost.

AnglicanGeeks ‏@AnglicanGeeks 21 Oct
#GAFCON gathers #Anglicans from across the globe to build friendships and share ministry of reaching out in our broken world. #GAFCON2013

Sam Allberry ‏@SamAllberry 21 Oct
Seems right that an Anglican conference - even a global one hosted in Kenya - should formally begin with afternoon tea. #gafcon2013

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013

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Posted October 23, 2013 at 11:08 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Selected Tweets from the #GAFCON2013 feed - October 22, 2013 (also some tweets from #GAFCON, and #GAFCON13)

Satan ‏@thetempter 22 Oct
Gafcon getting dangerous. Too many calls for solid gospel teaching and solid training. Bad for business. Love, Satan X #gafcon13 #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould 22 Oct
"You are not alone!" - the great #GAFCON13 encouragement we've heard over the past few hours

Mel Lacy ‏@lacymel 22 Oct
Amazing testimonies of godly Anglicans standing for Jesus in horrendous situations around the world. Praise God for them #gafcon13

Richard Condie ‏@CondieR 22 Oct
GAFCON 2 shaping up as stimulating and stretching as 2008. Heard about the persecuted, compromised, and lonely church today. #gafcon2013

Zane Elliott ‏@squeakycog 22 Oct
Amazing afternoon discovering that "we are not alone" as we surveyed the state of the Anglican Communion. God is faithful #gafcon2013


Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather 22 Oct
As we hear from one another of the challenges facing the Communion let us not forget that darkness does not overcome our Light #GAFCon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
Church of NZ. Lonely. Isolated. Trying to honor Jesus in a country that prides itself on pushing boundaries. #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
Shocking stats on UK clergy. 1/4 male clergy don't believe the trinity, 1/2 that Jesus is unique Saviour. Even fewer of females. #gafcon13

David Ould ‏@davidould 22 Oct
Paul Perkins tells #GAFCON13 about the institutionalised compromise of the CofE.

Matt Lemsing ‏@mattlemsing 22 Oct
A worldly church will always oppose a church that takes Gods word to the world. #gafcon13 #gafcon2013

Mel Lacy ‏@lacymel 22 Oct
If the church is sent into the world, what a tragedy when the church is infected by the world - Paul Perkins #gafcon2013

Matt Lemsing ‏@mattlemsing 22 Oct
While the world wants cheap grace, it's not the grace it needs. It's greatest needs is that it's sins be forgiven. #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
Biblical repentance is about being horrified at ourselves and hoping in Christ. The Western church is teaching the opposite. #gafcon13

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather 22 Oct
"People think revival is the top being blown off, when really its the bottom falling out" #GAFCon2013 #repentance

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
The cheap grace of western church is repentanceless and self-bestowed. Christ is methodologically excluded. We are exalted. #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
Mike Ovey firing up #gafcon2013 #gafcon13 with a rebuke of the cheap grace of the West. God's been ignored!!

David Ould ‏@davidould 22 Oct
Dr Mike Ovey of @OakHillLondon gives address on the loss of repentance in the West. #GAFCON13 pic.twitter.com/iA8edtUOEP

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather 22 Oct
Morning tea outside All Saints, enjoying some great Kenyan brew #GAFCon2013 #LaterGram http://instagram.com/p/fxM01cl3tc/

Karin Sowada ‏@karinsowada 22 Oct
Rachel, Maasai woman & rep Mothers Union Kenya - 'a great multitude...from every nation' Rev 7:9 #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/bMUdyqhqJS

Sam Allberry ‏@SamAllberry 22 Oct
Just so everyone's clear, these guys can SING. And dance. At the same time. #feelingEnglish #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/g9mvSyBBCl

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
GAFCON 1 acknowledged that the Anglican Communion had been paralysed by a false gospel. - Bsp Wabukala, Chairman #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
The paralysis has intensified and we need new wine skins to reach the world with the Gospel. - Bsp Wabukala #gafcon13

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue 22 Oct
Big themes of GAFCON today are atonement, salvation, inspiration and mission. #gafcon13 #gafcon2013

Zane Elliott ‏@squeakycog 22 Oct
#gafcon2013 celebrated Holy Communion this morning 'If you take out the resurrection, xty is an empty shell.' Most Rev. Emmanuel Egbunu

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference 22 Oct
#Anglican leaders began the day singing Oh Worship the King and We are Marching in the Light of God". #GAFCON2013 pic.twitter.com/XTmev1H5AF

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference 22 Oct
Tuesday morning Eucharist! 1,352 #Anglicans at #GAFCON2013 worshipping The Lord. Great way to start a day! pic.twitter.com/BFmbeHd9tp

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog 22 Oct
I am amazed by the hospitality being extended by the Anglican Church of Kenya for #GAFCON2013. So many bright and smiling faces - it's totally contagious.

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog 22 Oct
I admit - I got quite a bit emotional when we gathered @The_ACNA delegates for a group photo at #GAFCON2013. Such a great team!

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog 22 Oct
#Anglican Archbishops and Bishops gathered in Nairobi, Kenya for #GAFCON2013 pic.twitter.com/4lUCm4wYvp


Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013

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Posted October 23, 2013 at 11:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Since the GAFCON conference delegates broke up into smaller "mini-conferences" today, it's less easy to get a feel for what transpired. No plenary transcripts or videos. The Twitterverse gives a good overview of the day and glimpses of some of the mini-conferences. It's also good to get a taste of the preaching on Ephesians 2.

Selected Tweets from the #GAFCON2013 feed, October 23, 2013

Chris Edwards ‏@musicbyfaith
Thrilling to hear what's coming out of Nairobi this week at #gafcon2013 - a strong centre of gravity for the future of biblical Anglicanism.

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
“Without the witness of the spirit of Christ, our witness is futile.” -Dr. Alfred Owla #GAFCON2013 http://bit.ly/16tcypP #Anglican

Richard Condie ‏@CondieR
An Aussie (Kanishka Raffel), a Ugandan (Alfred Olwa), a Brit (Mike Ovey), an American (Ashley Null), amazingly stimulating day #gafcon2013

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference
"GAFCON is one of those unstoppable movements. We praise God for the leaders." -#GAFCON2013 FB page comment #Anglican http://tinyurl.com/navgm4q

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
Archbishop Ben Kwashi of Nigeria is teaching on the priorities for a bishop's leadership at #gafcon2013... http://fb.me/2CmiV9c20

Jeff Walton ‏@jeffreyhwalton
"This is the heart of the GAFCON meeting: that the gospel may transform the cultures we live in." -Dr. Alfred Olwa @ #GAFCON2013 #Anglican

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
If Christians think the Church is the place where they get their needs met they won't respond sacrificially to the Gospel -Tong #gafcon2013

Kukunda Liz Bacwayo ‏@busingye
#GAFCON2013 Poverty is not lack of resources, its a mindset #aid&development mini conference . Jesus can change the mindset

Kukunda Liz Bacwayo ‏@busingye
#GAFCON2013 Money is needed 4 #development but it doesn't drive #development . Say what?

Kukunda Liz Bacwayo ‏@busingye
#GAFCon2013 #Aid&development mini conference brought out some unexpected reactions. Makes one wonder about how we define #development mini

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey
Fellowship must be in the truth for that is the only fellowship there is. #ephesians2 #gafcon2013 #fb

Joshua Kuswadi ‏@JoshuaKuswadi
Bishops singing "This is my story, this is my song, Praising my Saviour all the day long." #gafcon2013 #africansingingrocks #loudandproud

Anglican Future ‏@gafconference
"This is wonderful, defining the Unity we are in Christ. Quite Awesome" #GAFCON2013 FB page comment http://tinyurl.com/navgm4q

Matt Lemsing ‏@mattlemsing
Nazir Ali giving a brilliant lecture on the history of Islam. #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/fZIw0Amiyw

Lee Gatiss ‏@LeeGatiss
It's not enough to just teach theology. We must train people for ministry. #gafcon2013

ACNA ‏@The_ACNA
#Anglican women from around the world gather to pray together at #GAFCON2013 https://scontent-a-atl.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/1381648_434064726698719_1407687865_n.jpg … #Episcopal #prayer

David Ould ‏@davidould
Very muted applause for @ABCJustin video. #gafcon2013 but massive applause for volunteers!

Rev. Anson Ann ‏@revansonann
Kanishka Raffel+ just preached an absolutely marvelous expository sermon from Eph 2 on the Grace of God. Must listen again. #GAFCON2013

Matt Lemsing ‏@mattlemsing
Cannot abandon the prophets & apostles without abandoning The Lord.We must not be moved from the foundation that has been laid. #gafcon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
We grieve those who abandon the cross, the apostles testimony and grace. Without the cross there is no hope. #gafcon2013 @KanishkaRaffel

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
There must be welcome, reconciliation, fellowship in prayer and the truth here at GAFCON. #ephesians2 #gafcon2013 @KanishkaRaffel

David Ould ‏@davidould
with tears, @KanishkaRaffel tells us of the reconciling embrace of repentance, forgiveness and love that grace brings. #gafcon2013

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
Humanity without Jesus: stateless, friendless, hopeless, godless. #ephesians2 #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
"the wonder that God has raised YOU????!!!! Praise His Glorious Grace!!!!" - @KanishkaRaffel #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
if we get grace wrong, we get devotion, evangelism, discipleship, works of service, relationships wrong" - @KanishkaRaffel #gafcon2013

Canon Jack Lumanog ‏@CanonLumanog
"If you are spiritually dead, you don't need a doctor. You need a resurrection." - Rev Kanishka Raffel #gafcon2013 #anglican

Nigel Fortescue ‏@nigelfortescue
The best words in Ephesians 2 are these.... "But God..." #gafcon2013

David Ould ‏@davidould
Now @KanishkaRaffel preaches on Ephesians 2. #gafcon2013 pic.twitter.com/wTsuY7qm8i

Heather Strong Moore ‏@StrongHeather
When we started worshipping together it was beautifully remarkable to join our many cultures. Today it is joyfully normal #GAFCon2013

daveclancey ‏@daveclancey
Never has 'The church's one foundation' sounded so good or meant so much. #gafcon2013 #fb pic.twitter.com/YF5btGQS9p

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & PrimatesGACON II 2013

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Posted October 23, 2013 at 7:27 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

...while Hauerwas (following Kaye) argues that the particularity of Jesus of Nazareth becomes universalised across the globe in particular and local ways, the new challenge confronting Christians is that these different particular expressions of Christianity now sit right next to each other, thanks to a virtual 24-hour news cycle. As Anthony Giddens observes, the intensification of modern trans-national relationships is such that "local happenings are shaped by events occurring many miles away." Social relations are being "lifted out" out their local contexts and restructured across time and space. Thus a bishop is consecrated in New Hampshire, and immediately an Archbishop in Nigeria responds. An Episcopal election is contested in Tanzania, and bloggers across the globe instantly construct conspiracy theories. When Justin Welby announces that he won't be attending GAFCON II because he must baptise a new heir to the throne, it quickly becomes an object of scrutiny in Florida.

This reality suggests that the calls to return to a focus on the local parish by Hauerwas and Jensen require considerable modification. When Jensen warns against Christians "talking only to each other and becoming increasingly incomprehensible to those on the outside," we should imagine this issue not simply as being limited to the Diocese of Sydney and its local community, but recognise that it applies to a much more expansive community "on the outside." Similarly, when Hauerwas suggests that Christians need to "learn to be where we are," the image that should come to mind is not of some small country village, but the global village.

If the Anglican Communion is to manage - as Hauerwas (following Kaye) puts it - "to maintain catholicity without Leviathan," it will only do so after coming to terms with the compression of space and time that has been produced by contemporary patterns of communication and travel.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryParish Ministry* Culture-WatchGlobalizationHistoryScience & Technology* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral Theology

1 Comments
Posted October 17, 2013 at 3:49 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Seitz asks, "If a new liturgical rite, a new metro-political PB, and probably a new constitution (in the case of TEC, reinforcing a new polity) are now part of the agenda of the new season, will dioceses and parishes be permitted to do what has been done up until this new time, as the church inhabited this time and space previously?" I think the recent history of the Diocese of South Carolina, as well as several other dioceses, has already given us an answer to that question.

When I read Seitz' statement, "Let justice and mercy kiss each other, as conservatives are permitted to remain on familiar trails, while the larger Episcopal and Anglican bodies in North America forge ahead where they believe God is calling them. If in time they part ways, at least it could happen in a spirit of charity and loving-kindness," I feel as though I am reading something written in 1998, not 2013.

If in time they part ways??? Hello? There is already a parting of the ways....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryGlobal South Churches & Primates* TheologySeminary / Theological Education

24 Comments
Posted October 11, 2013 at 7:40 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves


With thanks to Kevin Kallsen and George Conger at Anglican TV

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted October 7, 2013 at 6:21 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Story Index:

Communion Bishops go to Canterbury 00:00
Texas & South Carolina Victories 07:23
Teaching Americans how to speak English 18:11
It is Just a War 31:50
Trimming the dead branches 39:38
Closing and Bloooopers 44:21

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

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Posted September 5, 2013 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

My crystal ball is telling me that Holy Women, Holy Men and the furor around it is emblematic of the liturgical issues that we will be dealing with in the next few decades. We are at the point where we must come to terms with the fact that we have inherited a prayer book with a greater catholic appearance but without catholic substance behind it. To put a finer point on it, we have a catholic-looking calendar of “saints” yet no shared theology of sainthood or sanctity. While a general consensus reigned that the appearance was sufficient, the lack of a coherent shared theology was not an issue. When we press upon it too hard—as occurred and is occurring in the transition from Lesser Feasts & Fasts into Holy Women, Holy Men into whatever will come next—we reap the fruits of a sort of potemkin ecumenism that collapses without common shared theology behind it.

Is there a catholic theology of sanctity in the Episcopal Church? Yes, in some places. Is there an inherently Episcopal theology of sanctity that proceeds naturally from the ’79 BCP that is in line with a classic Christian understanding? Without question! But is it known? No. Is there any common Episcopal understanding of sanctity? The arguments around the church especially as embodied in the discussions within the SCLM lead me to answer, no—I don’t think so.

The struggle of this current generation will be to wrestle with a liturgy that portrays a catholic appearance but lack a catholic substance behind it. It’s not that the substance can’t be there—it’s that it’s not.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch HistoryLiturgy, Music, Worship* TheologyEcclesiologySacramental Theology

4 Comments
Posted August 6, 2013 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Christians in these circumstances are facing a dangerous backlash, Church leaders having supported the ousting of Mr Morsi. Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Orthodox Church – at whose enthronement last November in Cairo the Archbishop of Dublin acted as a representative of the former Archbishop of Canterbury – was critical of Mr Morsi’s pro-Islamist approach and attended the ceremony at which the army’s commander, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, announced the suspension of the country’s constitution. The killing of a Coptic priest and attacks on Christians’ homes have shown very clearly how vulnerable the approximately 10 per cent minority is in the situation.

The Church must heed the call of Bishop Anis and pray at this time for healing in a very troubled nation, and for all Christians in Egypt who are suffering real personal dangers.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesThe Episcopal Church of Jerusalem and the Middle East* International News & CommentaryMiddle EastEgypt

0 Comments
Posted August 2, 2013 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

To compare the mentality of a brother bishop to school shooters (see here), or to call him and presumably those close to him "petty deciders or wolves who masquerade as sheep" is incredibly inappropriate for any Christian, not to mention bizarre. I truly have never before heard or read such a spiteful and hate-fueled speech on either side of our present unpleasantness. This type of hateful and over the top language is even worse coming from a leader who claims to speak for the "national Church" and all Episcopalians. Let me be clear: I am an Episcopal priest and the Presiding Bishop does not speak for me. I have no delusion that I share in any ownership of anything outside of my parish and my diocese. The idea that one person, even if one agrees with the present incumbent, can speak for all Episcopalians is sheer lunacy.

To be fair, this centralization of power and influence certainly did not start with the present Presiding Bishop, but we do well to consider the state in which we find ourselves. Power corrupts, and the Presiding Bishop rightly notes that when one figure assumes the power it often leads to abuse, tyranny and corruption. She apparently fails to see how this truth has been demonstrated in her term as Presiding Bishop. Fast tracking bishops to "renounce their orders" rather than letting the House of Bishops speak, inhibiting without the consent of the three most senior active bishops (which the new Title IV conveniently does not require), and setting up new dioceses (which TEC has every right to do) while violating the canons of TEC all point to an office that has overgrown its canonical bounds and is running unchecked.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SchoriTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Polity & Canons--Aggressive Title IV Action Against Multiple Bishops on Eve of Gen. Con. 2012* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

2 Comments
Posted July 13, 2013 at 6:26 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There is clearly a division among faiths occurring, which is based on a similar division among cultures. The Anglican Communion, such as it was, was a brave attempt to bridge cultures under the banner of one faith, ultimately stemming from the Church of England. But with that Church now splintering over the issue of women in the episcopate, and the majority's treating the issue as one of straightforward "civil rights," can the admission of openly noncelibate gays and lesbians to the Church's episcopate be far behind? After all, that issue will be debated in the Church on that same ground of "civil rights," which the English Archbishops recently cited in Parliament to support the measure allowing same-sex civil marriages.

And there you have it. For America, Canada, Britain, and many other European countries, it all boils down to "equal civil rights" for all, regardless of gender or sexual orientation, and their country's churches feel bound to mirror, and thus to honor, in their own structures that which the legislatures (or judges, as in America) have decreed.

But for traditional Anglicans, including those in GAFCON, the Church is the keeper and guardian of the faith, and is not free to jettison Holy Scripture in an effort to accommodate the society in which it finds itself.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

5 Comments
Posted July 9, 2013 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves


Thanks to Kevin Kallsen and Fr George Conger at Anglican TV

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

1 Comments
Posted June 24, 2013 at 9:23 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There’s been a lot of nonsense written about what the statement from the Bishop of Leicester following the Second Reading in the Lords of the Same-Sex Marriage Bill actually means, chiefly down to the spin that the Telegraph put on it. However, if you read the statement carefully you can see that the Church of England has not surrendered on the Bill and in fact may very well continue to oppose it in Committee stage and at a Third Reading.

Let’s read what the Bishop actually wrote, not what others are implying he wrote.

Both Houses of Parliament have now expressed a clear view by large majorities on the principle that there should be legislation to enable same-sex marriages to take place in England and Wales.

It is now the duty and responsibility of the Bishops who sit in the House of Lords to recognise the implications of this decision and to join with other Members in the task of considering how this legislation can “.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesMarriage & FamilyReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

29 Comments
Posted June 12, 2013 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Essentially, what is at issue on the motion to remand is whether or not the Court can fairly read the Lawrence State court complaint to state a "claim or controversy" under the laws of the United States, so that the case could have been brought initially in the federal Court. One would think that a complaint based only upon State trademark law would be left to the State courts to decide, but ECUSA and its Potemkin diocese saw things differently. ECUSA has not done well in the South Carolina State courts, and so they wanted desperately to have the federal courts take jurisdiction of the dispute over who owns the rights to the name "Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina."

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South Carolina* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues

0 Comments
Posted June 8, 2013 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Peter Catt (“Scripture, Science, and the Big Story”) is the oddest piece, arguing that we should reject the biblical storyline since it created the oppressive “Christendom narrative” and opt instead for a meta-narrative based on quantum physics and evolution.

I would aver that the central contention of this book is that Scripture is safe for progressive Christians because it is not normative but is negotiable. I would even argue that the primary aim is to reject the notion that Scripture is the “norming norm” as tradition has often put it, thus freeing us to either cherry pick its contents, or to disregard it entirely. The book, for reasons well-motivated given the context, is about liberty from biblical authority and imagining an Anglican future where the Bible has no more authority than archived copies of the church bulletin.

Let me say that I understand the dilemma of grappling with difficult passages (difficult theologically, historically, and ethically) and trying to show the relevance of a book that includes pre-scientific creation accounts, ancient near eastern law codes, Jewish poetry, Graeco-Roman biographies, lengthy letters with heavily didactic content, and an Apocalypse, all written in times and places very foreign to our own time and place.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary* Culture-WatchBooks* TheologyTheology: Scripture

0 Comments
Posted May 29, 2013 at 10:29 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Goddard had fewer than four months to research and write the book and acknowledges that his conclusions and judgments are “initial [and] tentative” (p. 8). Each chapter provides a summary of Williams’s speeches, interviews, and sermons relevant to the topic at hand, along with commentary from Goddard and a handful of other individuals whom he interviewed. At times, the chapters feel like little more than lengthy quotations from Williams’s own writing. This is no bad thing, however. To read Williams’s original words in the context in which they were first delivered is refreshing. In any event, their complexity and depth defy easy summation. (At least two other books on Williams, Rupert Shortt’s Rowan’s Rule and Mike Higton’s Difficult Gospel, similarly rely on lengthy quotations.)

Goddard’s tight writing schedule presents other problems, as it causes him occasionally to pass over significant moments too briefly. For instance, he mentions Williams’s “historic meeting with [Zimbabwean President Robert] Mugabe” (p. 144) but provides no additional information on what made it historic or why it was significant to Williams’s ministry. These are judgments that a tight publishing deadline likely cannot accommodate.

A larger disappointment is that the people Goddard interviewed to inform his judgments seem a limited lot. They are overwhelmingly male and from the Euro-Atlantic world.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams* Culture-WatchBooks

0 Comments
Posted May 12, 2013 at 1:01 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

So, Christmas Christians are on the up.

And the number of christenings increased by 4.3%, which was accompanied by a rise of just over 5% in adult baptisms with a combined total of 139,751 baptisms – meaning that the Church of England conducted an average of over 2,600 baptisms each week during 2011. Thanksgivings for the birth of a child also rose - an 11.9% increase, taking numbers to 6,582....

The bad news?

Sunday attendance has declined over the decade, and this is particularly noticeable with child attendance:

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Christian Life / Church LifeLiturgy, Music, WorshipParish Ministry* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted May 8, 2013 at 8:08 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The Court says that Virginia is a State that follows and applies "neutral principles of law," but don't let that fool you. What exactly is so "neutral" about (a) judges creating a trust out of whole cloth that the parties themselves never formalized, so that (b) a church like ECUSA can secure a windfall for the unjust enrichment of one of its dioceses?

Justice Powell's result rests entirely upon her finding that a "fiduciary relationship" existed between The Falls Church and the national Church. But she spends no time whatsoever in examining the particulars of such a relationship, or deciding just when and how it actually came into being.

Fiduciary relationships are very special in the eyes of the law. A fiduciary is a person or entity in whom one confides (such as a client with his attorney, a patient with his psychiatrist, or a penitent with his priest) -- or it can also be a person or entity to whom one entrusts money or property, such as a client with his stockbroker or banker. Or it can simply be the trustee who holds certain property in trust for what the law calls the beneficiary of that trust -- the person for whose benefit the trust was established.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: Virginia* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues

1 Comments
Posted April 22, 2013 at 6:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

...One hundred or 150 years from today, the generations then may look back at ours and wonder about how unenlightened we were in some spheres of life.

Take Church leadership: they will wonder about how come a people who lived in the age of air travel, the Internet, and pinhole surgery, had for long been so blind to the obvious – that the strength of the Church, across its main denominations – Catholicism, Anglicanism, Pentecostalism (CAP) – in the late 20th and through the 21st Centuries lay in the Global South, and that is where its leadership should come from...

Read it all

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary

2 Comments
Posted March 19, 2013 at 9:51 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

From a letter to the editor in the local paper:
I was saddened and appalled, but not surprised, by the vindictive and mean-spirited language Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori used in her sermon on Saturday.

Alluding to Bishop Mark Lawrence as a "tyrant" and comparing him to "citizens' militias deciding to patrol ... the Mexican border for unwelcome visitors" was unconscionable.

And to say, "It's not terribly far from the state of mind evidenced in school shootings, or in those who want to arm school children, or the terrorism that takes oil workers hostage," was despicable.

That any Christian, much less a presiding bishop, would use such invective and incendiary words says more about the speaker than the person she is attempting to vilify.

However, she is the same person who has spent over $22 million to sue churches over their property, who refused to sell a church back to its congregation and instead sold it to a Muslim organization, and who sued beloved, retired bishops because they challenged her authority.

It is not surprising that the fruits of Bishop Jefferts Schori's leadership of TEC are a significant decline in members, controversy and confrontation with the majority of the Anglican Communion, and financial problems resulting in the need to sell prized land in Manhattan.

"They Will Know We Are Christians by Our Love" has been a favorite hymn of mine for over 50 years.

It is also a good barometer of a person's Christian character. The language used by Jefferts Schori from the pulpit is as unloving and un-Christian as it gets.

Still, as one who believes in a forgiving God and in spiritual transformation, I will continue to pray that TEC and Jefferts Schori may be inspired and imbued with the Holy Spirit and in the process may rise above petty name-calling and invective and embrace the love of Christ in what they say and do.

Dr. Peter T. Mitchell

Broad Street

Georgetown

I will take comments on this submitted by email only to at KSHarmon[at]mindspring[dot]com.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South Carolina* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryAdult EducationMinistry of the OrdainedPreaching / Homiletics* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues* South Carolina* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology


Posted February 1, 2013 at 7:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In our supposedly "secular" culture, the Church of England seems to have succumbed to the idea that theological ideas do not matter very much, and this may bespeak a deeper malaise even than the current crisis itself. Young people are turning back to the Church, longing for spiritual and intellectual bread; by and large stones await them, even despite a most promising new generation of young priest-scholars (women and men) who are beginning to rise through the ecclesial ranks. Perhaps in a generation things will be different.

But for the moment the Church has in effect signed its own theological death warrant. At the end of this summer, amid a new storm of fury about a confused conservative amendment to the Measure (astonishingly backed by both Archbishops to placate the defectors), I was invited to address the House of Bishops on "the theology of women bishops." I made the following three points, and stand by them:
we cannot compromise on the historic theology of the bishop as locus of unity;
we must return afresh to our distinctively Anglican notions of reason and tradition to solve this crisis, not lapse into rational incoherence; and
we must resist in the Church the supervenience of bureaucratic thinking (with all its busy political pragmatism) over theological and spiritual seriousness.
I offer here just a brief further expansion on each of these points.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops* Culture-WatchWomen* Theology

22 Comments
Posted January 30, 2013 at 6:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

What has caused the rust? The easy answer: the church lost the gospel. Waves of pragmatism, liberalism, and "Anglo-Catholicism" (a blend of Roman Catholicism and Anglicanism) have swept through the church, leaving wreckage in their wake.

But the actual cause is slightly more subtle. Anglicans still talk about the gospel, a lot. And mission. And even about being evangelical---the new archbishop self-identifies as an evangelical, though he certainly wouldn't recognize the definition of the term Don Carson and Tim Keller give in TGC's Gospel-Centered Ministry booklet.

The denomination never lost the words. But it lost the biblical content. In order to keep unity among people who differ over essentials, Anglicanism has increasingly emptied key concepts of their content. So you can sit in a room with 10 Anglican ministers and talk for half an hour about "the gospel" without ever defining the term and always knowing there are probably ten (or eleven!) different views.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* TheologyAnthropologyChristologySoteriology

3 Comments
Posted December 23, 2012 at 6:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori doesn't play by the rules. Specifically, she and her Council of Advice decided that the Bishop of South Carolina had renounced his orders as a bishop without following the canons, or laws, of the church. For example, the church's canons state that in order to renounce your orders, one must do so "in writing." The Bishop of South Carolina never wrote the Presiding Bishop, or any one for that matter, claiming to renounce his orders. This is just one example of the current state of lawlessness in The Episcopal Church. Canon Phil Ashey reflects on these recent events in this week's Anglican Perspective.

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SchoriTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Polity & Canons* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

2 Comments
Posted December 10, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

After the General Synod failed to give Final Approval to the draft legislation on the ordination of women to the episcopate, I had hoped for a period of calm, prayer and reflection all round; and perhaps some sense of regret, on the part of the proponents of the Measure, that they had not got the legislation right. Of course, as we now know, this was very far from the case: instead, a media furore, and a sense from some quarters that those who had voted against the Measure need to be punished in the future for daring to step out of line.

We need to say very clearly, that we understand, and deeply regret, the pain, hurt and anger felt on the part of many women clergy and their supporters; that we value the huge contribution of ordained women to the life of the Church of England; and that we recognise the gifts which God has given in and through their ministries.

However, we also need to challenge some errors and misunderstandings which have been widespread since the vote was taken....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops* Culture-WatchWomen

1 Comments
Posted December 6, 2012 at 3:59 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Diocesan Conventions/Diocesan Councils* South Carolina

5 Comments
Posted November 18, 2012 at 5:55 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

During my career that included being president of two church-related liberal arts colleges, an insightful faculty member at one of the colleges called the relativist philosophy sweeping across campuses as a “diverse like me” mind-set. Diversity is great as long as it includes all those who agree with a certain postmodern worldview....

Where is diversity with fellowship and communion? Where is affirming the image of God in persons who disagree? Where is welcoming with abundant and radical hospitality? Where is the church broad enough to embrace within its communion every living soul? Where is the tiny space we worked so hard to find so that we could remain in TEC?

That tiny space to stand on principle and belief has become a razor’s edge of hypocrisy, severing a tie that should have remained. That tiny space has been eliminated by a “diverse like me” mind-set in a dysfunctional polity. And the Episcopal Church, the original and legitimate Diocese of South Carolina, the Anglican Communion and God’s kingdom on Earth will be the worse for it.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Diocesan Conventions/Diocesan Councils* South Carolina* Theology

2 Comments
Posted November 18, 2012 at 5:48 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At an uncongenial hour, I find myself on Radio 4’s excellent Sunday programme, telling Ed Stourton that I can’t imagine that Justin Welby has ever thrown a bread roll in a restaurant in his life. Others were discussing the new Archbishop of Canterbury’s churchmanship, but there isn’t a serious issue that I’m not prepared to overlook when I’m at the BBC – just call me George “Entwistle” Pitcher.

What I was really trying to say is that Archbishop-elect Welby isn’t an Old Etonian in the Boris Johnson and David Cameron tradition. He’s about as far from the Bullingdon Club of Boorish Hoorays as it’s possible to be. Well, as far as Cambridge is from Oxford, anyway.

But it made me wonder, in the early hours of Sunday on national radio, if I was indulging in a gratuitous and offensive stereotype of Etonians.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops

1 Comments
Posted November 16, 2012 at 9:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Why in the world, then, would the "remain Episcopal" group, consisting of some twelve parishes in the Diocese, want to get off on such a wrong foot under South Carolina law? The answer is plain, no matter how much they may try to disavow it, and play the innocent: they are wholly subservient to their captain, and that captain is Katharine Jefferts Schori, the Chief Outlaw of the Episcopal Church (USA).

It is only with her recognition, aid and support that these others could go down such a lawless path of their own. Inspired by her example, they have impersonated the Diocesan office in two emails, misused the corporate seal, and pretended to be who they are not under South Carolina law. This is, of course, all pursuant to, and in order to further yet again, 815's Grand Strategy for dealing with dissident dioceses, as spelled out by 815 itself and discussed in this earlier post.

As the ACI article carefully explains, the ...[Presiding] Bishop's outlaw strategy in South Carolina is not just invented from day to day; it is self-contradictory, and will result in embarrassment in the courts. On the one hand, 815 is acting as though the Diocese has not left, but has only had all of its positions suddenly become vacant -- and it is going about the process of filling them with new people.

But on the other hand, the actions in South Carolina being taken by the Presiding Bishop are canonical only if there is no longer a Diocese there, but only patches of raw territory waiting to be organized as a new diocese. So which is it?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SchoriTEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Polity & Canons* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

0 Comments
Posted November 13, 2012 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAlternative Primatial Oversight (APO)Anglican ProvincesAnglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

0 Comments
Posted November 6, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I am in Auckland, NZ, at the 15th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC15). The agenda moved into high gear today with presentations on "The Bible in the Life of the Church" (BILC), the Network for Interfaith Concerns (NIFCON) Report "Promised Land?", an Anglican Communion resource for addressing Israeli-Palestinian relations, and the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order (IASCUFO) report on The Instruments of Unity.

I believe that the discussion on BILC revealed an important major conclusion that tips the hand of the ACC's leadership: that the process of how Anglicans interpret scripture is as important as the substance of scripture. Two conclusions will follow from this premise: (1) Context reigns supreme in how people interpret, and in the diversity of interpretations that flow from diversity of contexts NO interpretation is better than another (a point made by the preselected TEC leader of one of the small groups), and (2) There are no "limits" on faithful interpretation (point made by the preselected Church of England rep from another reflection group).

In this discussion, initial enthusiasm for the affirmation of Bible study gave way to sharp differences over the language in the proposed resolution, and then to frustration that there was not enough time to consider the resolution.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Consultative Council* International News & CommentaryMiddle EastIsrael* TheologyTheology: Scripture

5 Comments
Posted November 3, 2012 at 2:29 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Williams did however say in his interview that, because of growing demands, “I suspect it will be necessary, in the next 10 to 15 years, to think about how that load is spread; to think whether in addition to the Archbishop of Canterbury there needs to be some more presidential figure who can travel more readily”, who “has the support of the primates of the Anglican Communion” and “would have an executive role to implement what they decide”.

There are echoes of the controversial Covenant he had pushed for which would have bolstered the power of the primates over provinces other than their own, threatening “relational consequences” for those which failed to obey. This was rejected by the majority of dioceses in the Church of England and elsewhere, but it would appear that another drive for 'unity' is planned.

However, most of the overseas archbishops who have pushed hardest for disciplinary structures would be highly resistant to any interference in their own provinces, a recipe for further splits if any 'president' did not entirely do their bidding. Having an international leader could also be disastrous for the Church of England, already facing a sizeable drop in involvement in recent decades.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan WilliamsAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Sexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted October 10, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The last 12 months has seen a significant development in the Anglican Communion. National Anglican Churches (Provinces is the technical term) have begun to hold significant large gatherings of all Anglicans in their area along with international guests from other parts of the Communion.

This is part of the “celebration” level of church gatherings which can be classed as “cell” – or home groups, “congregation” – what most of us experience on Sundays and “celebration” – everyone getting together in an area or region. Churches in Oxford have done this for the last seven years with “Love Oxford” when many churches shut their doors on one Sunday and all meet together in a central outdoor location. English dioceses have occasionally done this by taking over a football stadium. Gatherings such as Word Alive, Bible by the Beach, Spring Harvest, New Wine and Keswick are also such celebrations....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary* Culture-WatchGlobalization

2 Comments
Posted August 27, 2012 at 4:09 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Not a week goes by (even in August) when the Unscripted team can't dig up some interesting news. Kevin and George discuss the...(recent developments) with AMiA and the turmoil at Pawley's Island. They also reveal some Crown Commission secrets, Anglican Job Postings and Affinity Dioceses. Peter Ould talks about an Englishman trying to sell more books and Allan gives some interesting history about leaving and staying in TEC at the same time.

Watch it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary- Anglican: Latest NewsAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)Episcopal Church (TEC)

0 Comments
Posted August 22, 2012 at 8:01 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

While a decline in the size of the church is unfortunate, I’m fairly certain that truly liberal Christians are unconcerned.

Many liberal churches, even conservative churches that fall under traditional denominational labels (Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, Lutheran) have seen declines in membership. Bloggers and commentators are scrambling to figure it out. Can we blame the sexual revolution? Busy, two-career families that have no time for church? Consumerism, materialism, multiculturalism and relativism? Mega-churches?
But in decline, and perhaps only in decline, can churches re-discover the true ministry and mission of Jesus, which was to be radically tolerant and helpful to those who are poor, sick, outcast and marginalized.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012TEC Data* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry

9 Comments
Posted August 20, 2012 at 3:54 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012

3 Comments
Posted August 14, 2012 at 5:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Whilst the British Government seem to be considering easing some sanctions against Mr Mugabe and his personal allies, I am not convinced that the time has come to weaken international opposition to the President of Zimbabwe’s irresponsible, undemocratic, lawless, and at times brutal regime. I certainly won’t be placing an order for a new clerical collar at Wippells just yet.

We cannot allow Robert Mugabe off the hook. When I cut up my clerical collar, I said I would not put it on again until Mr Mugabe had gone from office – we need to stand in solidarity with the people of Zimbabwe and not forget the abuses and exploitation they have suffered at the hands of that administration.

The reason given by Her Majesty’s Government for this ‘step change’ in relations with Zimbabwe is the work going in to drafting a new constitution for that country. The recent meeting of European Union foreign ministers, which agreed to lift these restrictions on Mr Mugabe’s colleagues, have made this decision dependent only upon whether a ‘credible’ referendum is held on the new constitution. Perhaps if they had read the draft constitution they might have taken a different view.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of York John Sentamu* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesViolence* Economics, PoliticsForeign RelationsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryAfricaZimbabwe

1 Comments
Posted August 12, 2012 at 4:00 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Bishop Seabury Church]...is not alone in its decision to withdraw from the Episcopal fold. For decades there have been increasingly impassioned and heartfelt disagreements within the Episcopal community with respect to Christianity and the proper interpretation of the Bible.

The rip in the fabric of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America began tearing at least as far back as the 1960s when California Bishop James Pike decided the Holy Trinity did not exist and there was no Virgin Birth. Heresy charges were invoked against Bishop Pike but there was no will to move forward. For whatever reason (perhaps Pike’s beliefs were quietly shared) the church failed to reprimand the obstinate bishop....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch History* TheologyChristologyEthics / Moral TheologyTheology: Scripture

5 Comments
Posted August 8, 2012 at 7:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesChurch/State MattersReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

8 Comments
Posted August 3, 2012 at 4:38 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal IssuesChurch/State MattersReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted August 3, 2012 at 4:20 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

While I tend toward the progressive side in this controversy, I am not persuaded by either analysis. My own sense is that we face a crisis of credibility. For those especially under 40, the Episcopal Church (and its companion churches and faith traditions) no longer seems a credible place in which to engage God, learn to pray or to give ourselves in ministry. We seem, to those outside us, exclusive and opaque.

Those of us who love the traditions (and habits) of institutional Christianity might feel somewhat wounded by the seeming disinterest in the practices we have come to live by. But if the Episcopal Church is to thrive in the 21st century, it must do three things. It must develop a clear, missional identity. It must project that identity outward and invite people into it. And it must take seriously the needs and concerns of those who come toward us and adapt to the new life and energy they bring.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* Theology

8 Comments
Posted August 2, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012* Culture-WatchHistoryMediaReligion & Culture* Religion News & CommentaryOther FaithsSecularism* Theology

1 Comments
Posted July 30, 2012 at 5:31 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I experienced profound pride as my bishop was interviewed on CNN and gently explained the position of the Church and some of the pastoral implications of a decision that Convention had taken that would have a direct impact on me. I watched as a democratic deliberative body wrestled with deep theological and pastoral issues on the nature of the Church, its sacraments, and its mission. I watched in awe as members of the official youth presence, including our own David Kilp, stood to address the House of Deputies and Convention commissions and committees with passion, conviction, carefully crafted arguments, and all with aplomb. At their age, I could NEVER have done what I watched them do. And they did it with love for the Church. It gave me hope.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012

0 Comments
Posted July 27, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

How could anyone attend General Convention, where soaring worship, beautiful music and uplifting preaching marked daily worship, and note only the size of the Presiding Bishop’s crozier? And to pick two pieces of legislation out of more than 400 pieces presented (and then to mischaracterize one of them) is grossly unfair.

At this convention we decided to embark upon significant changes in our Church’s structure, agreed to trial use of a same-sex blessing policy and passed substantive resolutions in a variety of areas of our common life. Failing to address any of these key topics is to have missed the lede.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012TEC Bishops* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture

3 Comments
Posted July 25, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

...as a Christian theologian, I believe that the soundness of theological teaching does indeed manifest itself over the long run. That doesn’t imply that the churches should teach only what has been handed down from long ago; the church has changed its mind, and the church has erred, not only in their living and manner of ceremonies, but also in matters of faith. There is no way to guarantee that you’re not off-base. On the other and, if you adhere to what millennia of the saints have taught and believed, you’re a least somewhat less likely to be found in error than if you decide that you’re going to think it all up on your own, taking as fundamental a set of political and philosophical ideas developed over the last couple hundred years. The Enlightenment wasn’t A Bad Thing, but neither was it the dawning of the messianic era. If there’s something you want to identify with Jesus, or Christianity, then your argument is stronger if you can actually give numerous reasons for making that identification; and the more such reasons that you can provide, the stronger the theological argument. And if you want to repudiate a great deal of what is plausibly associated with Jesus and Christianity, it’s not unreasonable for people to question the extent to which your enterprise is still ‘Christian’.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012

1 Comments
Posted July 25, 2012 at 5:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Earlier generations of liberal Christianity, according to Gary Dorrien at Union Theological Seminary, were led by men who had a "deep grounding in Bible study, family devotions, personal prayer and worship." Their calls for reform were made in the context of a belief in "a personal transcendent God . . . the divinity of Christ, the need of personal redemption and the importance of Christian missions."

That's the liberal Christianity that helped produce the civil rights movement, for example. We owe this tradition a debt.

So what are we - especially we evangelicals - to make of the decline of the mainline churches? Dr. Timothy George, Chairman of the Board here at the Colson Center and Dean at Beeson Divinity School, has written an excellent article about this and we have it for you at BreakPoint.org. He issues a powerful call to spiritual vitality, theological integrity, humilty, and most of all, prayer.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)* Christian Life / Church LifeChurch History* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.

0 Comments
Posted July 24, 2012 at 4:02 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In a sense, this was probably to expected. Just view the language now used around issues of sexual identity. Whereas gay and lesbian — or even just gay — was once considered fine it is now necessary to add a whole bunch more of sexual identities.

The simplest is LGBT — lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender — but it is not uncommon to see LGBTTIQ — lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, two-spirited, intersex, queer and questioning.

Use these terms enough and no longer is it right question why these various groups are being jammed together — even though being transgender has nothing to do with being gay and I still have no idea how two spirited became a category. The decision that they are related comes from interest groups and not common sense. And now politicians, journalists and social scientist feel obliged to repeat this litany as if it was the law of the land.

This is nothing to do with liberalism but with group-think.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012* International News & CommentaryCanada

9 Comments
Posted July 24, 2012 at 6:59 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by The_Elves

Last updated 6th August 2012 at 7:30 p.m. EST [This post will be remaining 'sticky' at the head of this page - new posts are below sticky posts]
[For a Quick Guide and continued posts on Same Sex Liturgy as well as posts on Communion without Baptism and Transgender Resolutions see below]
SAME SEX LITURGY RESOLUTION A049 PASSED

Latest Developments [Updated 6th August 2012]
A prayer for the bishop and clergy of the Diocese of South Carolina who met on 25th July 2012 is here. Bishop Lawrence's report of that meeting is here. A parish letter sent to Bishop Lawrence during General Convention is here

On 6th August 2012 a Member of the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion, charged with overseeing the operation of the Anglican Communion Covenant, Bishop Ian Douglas approved the holding of gay weddings and blessings by clergy in the Diocese of Connecticut in solidarity with the Bishop of New York.

more below in the Quick Guide

Latest Posts
[*NEW] *Bishop Ian Douglas, Communion Standing Committee Member, Undertakes Same Sex Marriages [6th August 2012]
[*NEW] *(Moultrie, Georgia, Observer) St. John’s leaves Episcopal Church over theological rift [6th August 2012]
[full list of posts is now continued below the fold and is being updated regularly]

Responses from South Carolina
[*NEW] *Kendall Harmon—In an age of Angst and Anxiety, Be Mindful that The Lord will Provide [6th August 2012]
*What one South Carolina Parish Wrote Bishop Mark Lawrence During General Convention 2012 [2nd August 2012]
*Bishop Lawrence Meets with Clergy of the Diocese of South Carolina Following General Convention [31st July 2012]

[*NEW] *(Local Paper Faith and Values Section) Mark Lawrence—Church needs to be clear in its teaching [29th July 2012]
*[Lent & Beyond] A Prayer for the Diocese of South Carolina [25th July 2012]
*Bucking National Trend, Diocese of South Carolina Experiences Growth in 2011 [18th July 2012]
*On Short notice, Bishop Mark Lawrence Summons South Carolina Clergy to Talk about Gen. Con. 2012 [18th July 2012]
*Bishop Mark Lawrence’s Letter to the Diocese of S.C. to be read in all parishes Sunday morning [15th July 2012]
*Kendall Harmon Interviewed by The World Today about the recent General Convention [15th July 2012]
*South Carolina Differentiates Itself from Actions of 77th General Convention [12th July 2012]
*The deputation of South Carolina have released a statement this afternoon [11th July 2012]
*Kendall Harmon’s response to the GC 2012 Passage of Rites of Blessing for Same Sex Unions [10th July 2012]
*The South Carolina Deputation Statement on Passage of Rites of Blessing for Same Sex Unions[10th July 2012]

Quick Guide to Same Sex Liturgy Resolution AO49 [Regularly Updated]
Passed by the House of Bishops on 9th July 2012 with 111 for, 41 against, 3 abstentions. The Resolution in this final form was sent to the House of Deputies for consideration. Doubts about the procedure for approving these 'provisional' rites have been expressed by commenters Allan Haley here, The Living Church here, Anglican Ink here and Professor Seitz here and here and in this Christianity Today article

On 10th July 2012 the House of Deputies also passed the resolution voting by orders - Laity: 78% [86 yes, 19 no, 5 divided] and Clergy: 76% [85 yes, 22 no, 4 divided]. The final conformed resolution is here, a pdf of the official version is here and the resulting approved Liturgy for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships is here.

Protests have followed by 12+ bishops in the Indianapolis Statement, 30 deputies supported a statement read to the House of Deputies, and there have been further statements by the South Carolina delegation, Canon Theologian Kendall Harmon, and on 11th July 2012 the bishop and most of the deputation departed, and this Statement was issued. On 13th July 2012 the Standing Committee of the diocese of Central Florida issued this Statement and the Albany Bishops and Deputation this Statement.

On Sunday 15th July 2012, Bishop Mark Lawrence issued a pastoral letter to be read in Diocese of South Carolina churches reported in The State and Allan Haley comments here and there is a prayer here

On 19th July 2012, Bishop Mark Sisk of New York authorized clergy to officiate at same-sex marriages both in a religious capacity and as agents of New York State. On 20th July ACI released an analysis that Resolution A049 is legally, theologically and constitutionally flawed and made outside the constitutional authority of General Convention. On the same day the Global South Primates released a Communiqué noting with great sadness the passing of Resolution A049 authorizing 'a liturgy for blessing same-sex unions' and confirming their 'disappointment that The Episcopal Church has no regard for the concerns and convictions of the vast majority of Anglicans worldwide'.

Among those issuing pastoral letters or other statements saying they will not approve or permit Same Sex Blessings under Resolution AO49 in those dioceses are the bishops of South Carolina, Albany, Central Florida, Dallas, Florida, South Dakota, Springfield, Tennessee, Western Louisiana, and [with qualification] Northern Indiana who has made alternative arrangements and Alabama who nevertheless voted for them, and it is not clear where Upper South Carolina stands [please advise us of any updates on your bishops]

A prayer for the bishop and clergy of the Diocese of South Carolina who met on 25th July 2012 is here. Bishop Lawrence's report of that meeting is here. A parish letter sent to Bishop Lawrence during General Convention is here

On 6th August 2012 a Member of the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion, charged with overseeing the operation of the Anglican Communion Covenant, Bishop Ian Douglas approved the holding of gay weddings and blessings by clergy in the Diocese of Connecticut in solidarity with the Bishop of New York.


Posts on Same Sex Liturgy Resolution AO49 Continued from Latest Posts above
*Saint Francis in the Fields, Harrods Creek, Kentucky, responds to General Convention [2nd August 2012]
*An interview with Bishop “Holly” Hollerith (Southern Virginia) regarding blessing same sex unions [1st August 2012]
*Christopher Benson—Toward A Better Conversation about Same-Sex Unions among Christians [1st August 2012]
*Peter Moore on the Importance of How we Treat and Describe Other Christians [1st August 2012]
*Rector and Vestry Resign at Saint John’s in Moultrie, Georgia [31st July 2012]
*Alex Sanders and Peter Moore Debate the Inevitability of Same Sex Marriage (I) [29th July 2012]
*Communion Partner Participants Report on the Global South Mission Conference in Bangkok [26th July 2012]
*Bishop Howard: Same Sex Blessings not to be Authorized in the Diocese of Florida [26th July 2012]
*Dr Timothy George: Beware the Well Worn Path [26th July 2012]
*A Letter from Bishop Scott Benhase to the Diocese of Georgia [26th July 2012]
*Bishop John Bauerschmidt: no plans to authorize same sex blessings in the Diocese of Tennessee [25th July 2012]
*Bishop Duncan Gray: Same-sex blessings not to be held in the Diocese of Mississippi [25th July 2012]
*Bishop Jake Owensby reports to the Diocese of Western Louisiana on General Convention [25th July 2012]
*Dean Limehouse of Advent Cathedral Alabama responds to General Convention [23rd July 2012]
*[Birmingham News] Episcopal bishop says yes to same-sex blessings, but not in Alabama [23rd July 2012]
*Bishop Greg Brewer’s Pastoral Letter to the Diocese of Central Florida [22nd July 2012]
*Bishop Ed Little’s Pastoral Letter to the Diocese of Northern Indiana [22nd July 2012]
*Communiqué of the Global South Primates Bangkok, Thailand, 20 July 2012 [20th July 2012]
*[ACI] Same Sex Blessings: What Did General Convention Do? [20th July 2012]
*Bishop Mark Sisk: Gay Marriage Authorized ignoring Constitution and The Book of Common Prayer [20th July 2012]
*(ABC Religion and Ethics Report) America’s most influential church on the brink of collapse [20th July 2012]
*(CEN) The Episcopal Church endorses temporary local option on same-sex blessings [20th July 2012]
*(NBC News) Is liberal Christianity signing its own death warrant? [20th July 2012]
*(The State) Talks continue as potential split in SC Episcopal diocese looms [19th July 2012]
*Bishop Stanton’s Pastoral Letter to the Diocese of Dallas [19th July 2012]
*Anglican Unscripted Episode 45 [19th July 2012]
*The Bishop of Upper South Carolina Writes about General Convention [18th July 2012]
*Bishop who leads Central Gulf Coast Episcopal diocese will bless gay unions [18th July 2012]
*Beaufort County Episcopal church reactions vary to bishop’s letter on same-sex blessings [18th July 2012]
*(CNS) General Convention 2012 Decisions “a huge obstacle on the path to Christian unity” [17th July 2012]
*Western Mass. Episcopal clergy to bless, but not wed, same-sex couples [16th July 2012]
*Fort Worth parish protest over GC Indianapolis [16th July 2012]
*Diocese of Missouri Deputation—Telling our story [15th July 2012]
*Key Page for Finding out the Final Wording and Status of All General Convention 2012 Resolutions [15th July 2012]
*(RNS) Reaction mixed to Episcopal Church’s approval of same-sex rites [15th July 2012]
*An Article on the situation on the ground in East Tennessee after General Convention 2012 [15th July 2012]
*The Presiding Bishop Visits La Crosse, Wisconsin [15th July 2012]
*A Look Back to 2009: Philip Jenkins on TEC and the Communion—Their Separate Ways [15th July 2012]
*The Bishop of Fond Du Lac on General Convention 2012—Same Sex Blessings [15th July 2012]
*(Local Paper Faith and Values Section) Episcopal diocese officials object to recent church actions [15th July 2012]
*Allan Haley—Bishop Mark Lawrence Addresses His Diocese Following General Convention [15th July 2012]
*(Diocese of Albany) Chip Strickland on the last day of General Convention 2012 [15th July 2012]
*(The State) South Carolina Episcopal bishop blasts national church [15th July 2012]
*Ross Douthat—Can Reappraising Christianity [especially as practiced in Mainline Churches] Be Saved? [15th July 2012]
*(Orangeburg, S.C. Times and Democrat) S.C. Episcopal representatives denounce same-sex blessing rite [15th July 2012]
*Ryan Anderson reviews Debating Same-Sex Marriage by John Corvino and Maggie Gallagher [15th July 2012]
*(Tulsa World) Oklahoma Episcopal bishop will consult with diocese on same-sex unions [15th July 2012]
*The Episcopal Church: Liturgy for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships [14th July 2012]
*[Christianity Today] Episcopal Church Approves Same-Sex Blessing Rites [14th July 2012]
*The Bishop of Arizona responds to the WSJ Article on General Convention Posted below [13th July 2012]
*A Letter from the Rector of Truro Anglican Church on General Convention 2012 [13th July 2012]
*Statement of the Albany Bishops and Deputation in response to General Convention 2012 [13th July 2012]
*(WSJ) Jay Akasie on General Convention 2012—What Ails the Episcopalians [13th July 2012]
*A Statement from the Deputation of the Diocese of Central Florida on General Convention 2012 [13th July 2012]
*(Living Church) An Action of Solidarity in the House of Deputies [12th July 2012]
*Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island Statement on the Blessing of Same-Sex Relationships [12th July 2012]
*(ENS) South Carolinians have ‘grievous concern,’ over General Convention actions [12th July 2012]
*Episcopal Church passes same-sex blessings, Houston area church to offer new rite [12th July 2012]
*(KQED) What the Episcopal Same-Sex Union and Transgender Resolutions Mean for Californians [12th July 2012]
*Todd Wetzel’s Anglicans United Report on the House of Bishops debate on Same Sex Blessings [12th July 2012]
*(York Daily Record) Local pastors respond to Episcopal church approving same-sex unions [12th July 2012]
*Allan Haley—Diocese of South Carolina Fed up with General Convention [11th July 2012]
*(RNS) Reaction mixed to Episcopal Church’s approval of same-sex rites [11th July 2012]
*(CSM) Episcopal approval of same-sex blessings: Will it hurt church’s global ties? [11th July 2012]
*(Anglican Ink) 12 bishops say no to Same Sex Blessings [11th July 2012]
*(Seattle PI) It’s official: Episcopalians ratify same-sex “covenants” [11th July 2012]
*The Episcopal Bishop of Texas on Same Gender Blessings Vote(s) at GC 2012 [11th July 2012]
*Bishop Christopher Epting on Recent General Convention Developments [11th July 2012]
*(ENS) Same Sex Union Blessing rite authorized for provisional use from First Advent [11th July 2012]
*(USA Today) Episcopal Church approves same-sex blessing rite [11th July 2012]
*(BBC) US Episcopal Church approves same-sex blessing service [11th July 2012]
*(NY Times) Episcopalians Approve Rite to Bless Same-Sex Unions [11th July 2012]
*The Bishop of Bethlehem on Today’s Decision—Same Gender Blessings Resolution [10th July 2012]
*Statement of Integrity on Today’s Decision—Episcopal Church Authorizes Same-Sex Blessings [10th July 2012]
*Friends calling for prayer regarding The Episcopal Church and General Convention - Lent and Beyond
*Kendall Harmon: About Today and How to Receive the [Same Sex Liturgy] Resolution that will Pass [10th July 2012]
*Allan Haley Analyzes the Bishops Vote Yesterday, Showing its Violations of their own Governing Rules [10th July 2012]
*A Living Church Article on Yesterday’s Debate and Vote in the House of Bishops on Same Sex Liturgies [10th July 2012]
*(Reuters) Episcopalians set to be first big US church to bless Same-Sex marriage [10th July 2012]
*(ENS) Bishops vote to approve resources for same-gender blessings [10th July 2012]
*(Anglican Ink) House of Bishops endorses “provisional” same-sex blessing rites [9th July 2012]
*Finally Tweaked Version of Same Sex Liturgy Resolution A049 as Passed by the House of Bishops Today [9th July 2012]
*ENS Article pre Bishops Vote—‘Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant’ recommended for provisional use [9th July 2012]
*(AP) Episcopal bishops OK trial same sex blessing service; full church backs transgender ordination [9th July 2012]
*Episcopal Bishops Pass Same Sex Union Blessing Liturgy Authorization Overwhelmingly [9th July 2012]
*Live Twitter Feed (one of them) on the current House of Bishops debate on Same Sex Liturgies [9th July 2012]
*(SF) Sarah Hey—Why The Same Sex Trial Liturgy Will [Very Very Likely] Pass [9th July 2012]
***Important*** New Text Version of Same Sex Blessing Resolution A049 (as Amended in Commitee) [9th July 2012]
*Chicago Consultation—Nightly Update for General Convention 2012 on July 7 [9th July 2012]
*(ENS) General Convention PBLCM Committee hears testimony on same-gender blessings liturgies [8th July 2012]
*Hearing Tonight on Res. A049: Authorize Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Gender Relationships [7th July 2012]
*(Detroit Free Press) Episcopal Church losing members as it strives for inclusion [7th July 2012]
*(Indianapolis Star) Sexuality among key issues Episcopalians will confront at General Convention [7th July 2012]
*(Boston Globe) Episcopalians review a new rite for Same Sex unions [7th July 2012]
*Upper South Carolina Episcopal bishop not ready to endorse same-sex blessings [5th July 2012]
*(Phil. Inquirer) Episcopal Church leaders set to consider blessing rite for same-sex couples [5th July 2012]
*The Bishop of Milwaukee’s Thinkpiece on Same-Gender Unions on the Eve of GC 2012 [5th July 2012]
*NW Penna. Bishop Will Bless Same Sex Unions if General Convention 2012 gives the Go Ahead [5th July 2012]


COMMUNION WITHOUT BAPTISM RESOLUTION [CO29]
*An Important Anglican Ink Article on the House of Bishops Communion w/o Baptism Discussion [13th July 2012]
*New Text of Communion Without Baptism Resolution [C029] as Amended and Sent Back to HoD [12th July 2012]
*Resolution C029 on Communion for the Unbaptized Passes House of Deputies on a vote by orders [11th July 2012]
*Whats Happening with the Communion of the UnBaptized? [10th July 2012]
*(Diocese of Texas) William Treadwell on Communion w/o Baptism: Pastoral Theology vs. Doctrine [8th July 2012]
*TEC Gen. Con. 2012 Evangelism Commission rejects Communion of the Unbaptized outright [7th July 2012]
*An Interesting Blog Post from July 2007—How widespread is Communion Without Baptism? [7th July 2012]
*(ENS) ‘Water first, or table?’ Committee hears ‘open table’ testimony [7th July 2012]
*Res. C040, Called “Open table” resolution, but really Communion for Unbaptized, Has Hearing Today [7th July 2012]


TRANSGENDER RESOLUTIONS [D019] and [D002]
*(World) Expressing themselves—Episcopal Church votes to allow transgendered clergy and church ldrs [14th July 2012]
*Mark Tooley—A Transgendered Episcopal Church [11th July 2012]
*Living Church on the gender Identity Resolutions Debate in the H of Deputies Yesterday [10th July 2012]
*Jeffrey Walton—Activists for TEC’s New Theology Hail Victories at Episcopal Convention [10th July 2012]
*(AP) Episcopal bishops OK trial same sex blessing service; full church backs transgender ordination [9th July 2012]
*A Living Church Article on Yesterday’s Debate in the House of Bishops on Gender Identity [9th July 2012]
*(Reuters) U.S. Episcopalians move closer to allowing transgender ministers [8th July 2012]
*Both Transgender Resolutions Pass House of Bishops, Both South Carolina Bishops Speak Against [8th July 2012]
*Resolutions D002 and D019 Pass the House of Bishops [8th July 2012]
*Chicago Consultation (II)-Transgender People and the Church’s Transformative Mission [7th July 2012]
*Chicago Consultation (I)—Nightly Update for General Convention 2012 on July 6 [7th July 2012]
*(Reuters) Episcopalians debate transgender issue in Ministry [6th July 2012]
*Sarah Lawton offers Reflections on Resolutions D002 and D019 for General Convention 2012 [5th July 2012]
*The TransEpiscopal Blog on General Convention 2012 [5th July 2012]
[*NEW] * [6th August 2012]

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Commentary- Anglican: Latest NewsEpiscopal Church (TEC)* AdminFeatured (Sticky)* Culture-Watch* Religion News & Commentary* Resources & Links* Theology

17 Comments
Posted July 22, 2012 at 9:55 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012

2 Comments
Posted July 20, 2012 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Things at the General Convention, from a certain perspective, certainly didn't look good. My fellow deputies — I admit to serving as an elected member of this naughty assemblage — endorsed pretty much the same menu that hooked Episcopal appetites during the wild and woolly '60s. We're a church whose worship and formularies presuppose the ancient Christian truths; except the way we have come lately to express these truths often makes it seem our principal interests are "social justice," cultural diversity and the liberalization of sexual norms.

We slammed "colonialism," patted the Palestinians on the head, urged new government programs to create jobs, called for a carbon-unfriendly energy policy and instructed priests desirous of doing so to confer the church's blessing upon same-sex unions. I mean, are we the churchy version of The New York Times editorial page or what? Can't you see millions of Americans beating our doors down to hear us address the worst of modern anxieties — family disintegration, the loss of meaning in life, the burgeoning of government supervision and control over daily existence?

Actually, that's not what the church itself, at a slightly less exalted level, was saying. A report by the Standing Commission on the Mission and Evangelism of the Episcopal Church noted bleakly....

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012

8 Comments
Posted July 20, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You can find it over here. The segment begins about 1 minute and 45 seconds in and lasts around six minutes.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)Global South Churches & Primates* South Carolina* TheologyAnthropologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral TheologyTheology: Scripture

1 Comments
Posted July 15, 2012 at 4:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

"Shaw, MA: Our diocese has had significant growth recently, in thanks to including all people. ‪#gc77‬" I was listening and it is certainly an accurate paraphrase, though not an exact quote.

Here are the figures--Massachusetts' 2007 to 2010 ASA [average Sunday attendance]

20,121
19,351
18,130
17,903

Perhaps there are 2011 figures that show a [small?] increase, but still, there is a large disconnection here--KSH.

Update: You can find some of these statistics here and you can find a great deal more over there.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012TEC BishopsTEC Data

21 Comments
Posted July 10, 2012 at 5:10 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

There have been a number of occasions over the years in TEC like this where a key document or statement has come out, and the response has been, shall we say, less than satisfactory. Therefore there needs to be some preparation on our part so as to try to react in a Christian manner. Herewith some suggestions:

(1) Please try to read the actual text of the resolution itself and concentrate on the language used. I am sorry if this seems obvious but my Mom was an English teacher--you would be amazed at how little it actually occurs. Who are the worst people to do a Bible study with? Seminarians. Why? Because they have the most deep seated ideas of what the text says before they read it. It is vital that the text be heard on its own terms.

(2) Try to draw conclusions yourself FROM THE TEXT before getting your head clouded with what others think. Be aware that some of the early reactions will be wrong.

(3) When you consider others reactions, read from a variety of sources. You should regularly be visiting reappraiser and reasserter sites, writers you agree with and authors who drive you crazy.

(4) Make your early evaluations tentatively. "It seems to be saying that," "what I hear the statement saying is," are the kinds of things I would prefer to hear.

(5) Be aware that every statement like this goes through a process of sifting. Give it at least three days. There is an earthquake, there are aftershocks, and then things settle down.

(6) Expect the discernment to be a corporate activity. We still seek to be part of the Church of Jesus Christ, and we need one another. We are. as Ephesians says (4:15), to speak the truth in love. May the way we respond demonstrate this--KSH.


By the way--anyone recognize most of the language here? It is from something I wrote in 2007. Nick Knisely wrote [now Bishop-elect of Rhode Island] at the time that he found himself "pretty much full agreement with [my]suggestions"

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention --Gen. Con. 2012TEC BishopsTEC House of DeputiesTEC Polity & CanonsSexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessings* By Kendall* Culture-WatchMarriage & FamilyMediaReligion & CultureSexuality--Civil Unions & Partnerships* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral TheologyTheology: Scripture

6 Comments
Posted July 10, 2012 at 4:58 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Any Anglican theology of law is bound to use both pre- and post-Reformation authors such as Gratian, Aquinas, and Hooker. At the beginning of his Decretum, Gratian offers two important definitions: “What is put in writing is called enactment or law, while what is not collected in writing is called by the general term ‘custom.’” Aquinas used this distinction to posit a difference between divine law and natural law, both of which are unchanging, and human or positive law, which can be revised. Following Aquinas, Hooker maintained the same. Canon law is human law and insofar as it achieves a good end, the law itself is good. Should canon law fail in this, it must be revised. It is precisely here in a discussion of the good that canon law invokes other canons, namely, the canon of Scripture. If Scripture contains “all things necessary to salvation,” then canon law should be written to aid the Church in attaining these same divinely revealed ends.

Canon law is thus evangelical through and through. A church’s witness to the wider society begins with its own, internal witness. In this way, canon law is constructive, even in its punitive functions. The purpose of ecclesiastical discipline is never to punish but always to restore. The violation of canon law is a matter of no small importance in the Church, just as the violation of civil law is a matter of importance in the State. Only the arbitrary use of authority allows law to be violated in an ad hoc fashion. In the State this is called tyranny; in the Church it is called abuse. A church that cares nothing for canonical infractions also cares nothing for restoration. A church without confession is a church without repentance, and such a church is also without forgiveness, for it stands in need of lawful and righteous judgment. How can there be justice if there is no law?

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC Polity & Canons

2 Comments
Posted June 6, 2012 at 6:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

We believe the past General Convention structure has slavishly copied in ecclesial ink the politics and legislative processes of American culture. Episcopalians are fond of saying that the men who wrote the U.S. Constitution also created the church’s Constitution and Canons. It is an exaggeration but a telling one: General Convention looks and acts too much like Congress and not enough like a council of the Church.

Joseph D. Small, longtime director of theology, worship and education ministries for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), wrote in the March issue of First Things about what he called his church’s “democratic captivity” — its reliance on secular democratic procedure rather than proper theological discernment to order its common life. This, he argues, has been a key factor in aggravating his church’s divisions. To such observations, we can only concur.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)General Convention * Culture-WatchHistory* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* TheologyEcclesiology

15 Comments
Posted May 30, 2012 at 9:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

From here:
And, if you’re following what’s happening, what you’re seeing is the conservatives who have left, now that they’re out, and their identity was defined in part by what they were against as well as the Gospel they were for, trying to figure out how to live together, and how they should live, has actually been harder than they thought, and they’ve actually started to divide among themselves. And so, one of the current tragedies is the group that has left looks very American and very Protestant and very chaotic. And that just has to owned on the front end. I wish it were different, but they are having a hard time cohering and working together. And that is a problem not simply for them, but also for the other conservatives in the Episcopal Church, because they have said, essentially, “this is the faithful way to do this and you need to come join us.” And I just need to tell you that, in all sorts of ways, and I say this with a very sad heart, it’s not attractive. They’re really struggling. So that’s one side.


Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Episcopal Church (TEC)TEC ConflictsTEC Departing Parishes* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* TheologyEcclesiologyPastoral Theology

28 Comments
Posted May 2, 2012 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

You may find the link and comment thread here.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Episcopal Church (TEC)Global South Churches & PrimatesFCA Meeting in London April 2012* South Carolina

0 Comments
Posted May 2, 2012 at 6:06 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At the end of 2012 when he retires to Magdalene College, Cambridge Rowan Williams will have been Primate of All England for a decade. He did not need to retire until June 14, 2020. Various commentators after the announcement of his return to academe in a prestigious but largely honorary role described the post of Archbishop of Canterbury, primus inter pares of the Anglican Communion, as an “impossible job”. But, sadly, it is Rowan whose tenure of the job has made it seem so.

His term of office has been in many ways disastrous, and it is important to consider why that should be so. In different ways both he and his predecessor George Carey have destabilized rather than stimulated the Church of England. Carey’s poorly conceived and insensitive managerial reform of the central church institutions added to the bureaucratic governance and undermined the existing representative structures, while Williams’s search for a new control mechanism to over-ride the existing auto-cephalous provincial authority would have created more problems than it solved. Neither archbishop seemed to possess a well-grounded vision of where the established Church of England was or should be going. But Carey and Williams were outsiders with little or no experience as diocesan bishops in the CofE or of the political aspects of “establishment”.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

2 Comments
Posted April 29, 2012 at 12:25 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

If you believe, as most Americans do, that the upper reaches of the church don’t have much to do with the ground floor, the next Archbishop of Canterbury will have mostly trivial interest to you. Perhaps it will be John Sentamu, and the ECUSA is in for the deep-freeze. Perhaps it will be a conciliator or a caretaker. Perhaps it will be someone with an even more lush and vigorous patch of Muppet fur insulating his brows from the slings and arrows of church leadership. Who’s to say? But Easter will come, just as it did this year. There will be babies to baptize, teens to confirm, crappy church coffee to be drunk (maybe good sherry if you’re in the right congregation), and ministry to be done, regardless of who fills Williams’ seat.

But if you believe, as many Americans do, that it is of the utmost importance to speak with one voice on women in ministry, or the place of gays and lesbians in the church—if you believe that without a common creed and ethics and way of reading scripture, there’s no point in calling it a “church”—well then, you’re in for a very interesting six months or so. It’s unlikely that you’ll get a champion of orthodoxy like Benedict, and probably not such a fierce champion of unity-at-all-costs as Williams. You may have to face the same uncomfortable ideas that the rest of us are confronted with: that there is no single voice for Christianity, that Christ’s prayer “that they may all be one” is and always has been a fond wish and ardent desire but never a fact on the ground, that Christianity as a world movement has not produced a standard culture but has shaped and been shaped by many different cultures in many different ways, to the detriment of its coherence. But at this point, who the hell knows? You may find somebody who can bring it all back together, or (more likely), you may find another weak leader committed to togetherness in principle but unable to do much about it in practice. Either way, good luck, and definitely let us know if you find somebody with bigger eyebrows than Rowan Williams. We’ll want to be warned about that right away.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.* Religion News & CommentaryOther ChurchesUnited Church of Christ* TheologyEcclesiology

2 Comments
Posted April 23, 2012 at 5:34 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, the leader of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion, recently announced that he would step down by year’s end. A few days later, the Church of England rejected a Williams-backed unity plan for global Anglicanism, a church fractured by issues of gender and sexual identity. The timing of the resignation and the defeat are probably not coincidental. These events signal Anglicans’ institutional failure.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams* Christian Life / Church LifeSpirituality/Prayer* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture

5 Comments
Posted April 17, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Saying that he hopes that his successor has the constitution of an ox and the skin of a rhinoceros. Rowan Williams, the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury, will resign at the end of this year and return to academics. He will become the Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge where he can meander along the River Cam and take tea at the Orchard Garden in Grantchester far away from the turbulence of the 85-million member Communion he leaves behind. When an archbishop retires at the usual age of 70, no one bats an eyelash. But when he resigns in good health nearly a decade before normal retirement age, people sit up and take notice. It evokes the image of a battle weary pugilist whose “sponger” looks at the condition of his man and tosses his sponge in the air. The fight is over. We might as well declare defeat.

The battle, of course, was his to lose. Anyone with half an eye could see the turbulence that lay ahead for someone assuming the role of leader of the world’s second largest Communion. The same year he took office an openly gay man, Gene Robinson, was consecrated bishop of New Hampshire despite public assurances from Frank Griswold, the Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church, that he would not participate in the consecration. Griswold went right ahead and did just that. With one part of his Communion going its own way, and thumbing its noses at the rest, while the vast majority were profoundly upset, Williams was forced to choose. Either he would take a self-imposed mediatorial role, and desperately try to keep all parties at the table. Or he would take sides, and do what he could to bring the truculent back in line.

He chose the former, with the result that no one was satisfied. Privately he held to a liberal position on sexuality, as enunciated in his well-known, though highly inscrutable, paper entitled The Body’s Grace. Publicly, he towed the line that was spelled out by Lambeth Resolution 1:10, which stated as the official position of the Communion that “homosexuality was imcompatible with Scripture.”

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams

3 Comments
Posted April 15, 2012 at 2:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

I can support both the Jerusalem Declaration and an Anglican Covenant. The reason for this is not that I want to be accepted by two Anglican constituencies that seem to be dividing along supporting one or the other. Rather, they are both useful and valid in their proper context. The Declaration is a creedal statement to which I can subscribe as a clear articulation of what I believe and what I think is the Scriptural stance proper for the Church. As a matter of witness to the world and the Church, it is necessary to state publically one’s belief and be willing to be held accountable to that stated belief. One could argue that the fatal disease of the contemporary (as in present day and not style) church is that as a community it is unwilling to be seen as odd or is afraid of being accused of intolerance. An objective statement of belief is essential to any credible identity as a church.

The problem that I have with the Jerusalem Declaration is not to be found in its substance, but in its use. A creed does not unify, it solidifies. In other words, creeds help those who subscribe to them to coalesce around the creed, but ends any conversation with those who do not. If Jesus Christ is our foundation, then the creeds are the anchor bolts that hold our house to the foundation. They are not doors and windows through which we can talk to our neighbors. Historically, the creeds have demonstrated this property quite amply. The great ecumenical councils of the early Church were called to deal with false teachings, or at least to establish a benchmark for orthodoxy. The creeds that resulted were therefore reactions to specific problems rather than instruments that prospered relationships. It follows that a new creed has to be composed or the old one amended every time a novel idea enters the arena.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican CovenantEpiscopal Church (TEC)Global South Churches & PrimatesGAFCON I 2008* TheologyEcclesiology

0 Comments
Posted March 31, 2012 at 2:31 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury --Rowan Williams

5 Comments
Posted March 27, 2012 at 3:05 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Diocesan synods voted against the covenant, often in the face of great pressure from the vast majority of English bishops, who frequently made sure that the case for the covenant dominated proceedings. The bishops also exerted a certain amount of emotional blackmail, suggesting that if the scheme didn't pass, it would be very upsetting for the archbishop of Canterbury (cue for synod members to watch a podcast from said archbishop, looking sad even while commending the covenant).

Well, it didn't work, and now those particular bishops need to consider their position, as the saying goes. Principally, they need to consider a killer statistic: as the voting has taken place in the dioceses (and there are still a few to go), the pattern has been consistent. Around 80% of the bishops have voted in favour of the covenant, but the clergy and laity votes have split around 50-50 for and against, with votes against nudging ahead among the clergy. That suggests an episcopate that is seriously out of touch, not just with the nation as a whole (we knew that already), but even with faithful Anglican churchgoers and clergy in England.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican CovenantAnglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)CoE Bishops

29 Comments
Posted March 25, 2012 at 4:27 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

In my opinion, there have been three instances when Rowan Williams had an opportunity to do something about The Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada and chose not to. Number one was at the gathering of archbishops of the Anglican Communion in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in 2007 where the archbishops agreed that some discipline needed to be taken against these rogue churches. However, Rowan Williams took matters into his own hands, didn’t do what his fellow archbishops asked him to do and as a result, many of them decided not to come to future gatherings. They seemed to be thinking, “what’s the point in going if the Archbishop of Canterbury is going to overturn our decisions and take matters into his own hands anyway?”

Secondly, in a gathering of Anglican leaders, bishops, clergy and laity, in Jamaica, 2009, Rowan Williams intervened in the debate about the Anglican Covenant. The Covenant was designed to try and hold the Communion together around some kind of a confession of faith and discipline. His interventions during that debate, which I was present for, were bewildering. He seemed to undermine the very Anglican Covenant he’d been championing and cast doubts about his own leadership behind it.

Thirdly, in response to the crisis in the Communion, instead of giving more authority to those archbishops who were faithful to the Gospel, the Archbishop of Canterbury attempted to centralize power in his own Anglican Communion office and in the creation of the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion. These actions undermined the legitimacy and respectability of the other existing instruments of communion, unity and governance-and especially the Primates’ meetings.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Episcopal Church (TEC)

2 Comments
Posted March 23, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Much of what Rowan Williams writes and says carries the air of a man who has grown accustomed to being received seriously regardless of the soundness of his ideas, and who is used to having even the most incomprehensible of his pronouncements met by the irritating acquiescence common to other “bearded lefties.” But sounding profound is not the same thing as being profound, and we should not let the man’s spiritual standing distract us from the reality that he is wholly dangerous to the power of Western ideas.

Documenting his many missteps is a little like cataloguing the utterances of Prince Phillip, but without the compensation of the consort’s dry sense of humor. An example: In response to protesters whose actions were steadily destroying the income, and thus upkeep, of London’s St. Paul’s cathedral, Williams claimed that Jesus Christ would have been an Occupier. Former Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey took a different view, noting that the protesters were “opportunistic and cynical,” and questioning the way in which senior clergy “mismanaged” the situation; his skepticism was vindicated when protesters began to defecate inside the cathedral and spray-paint graffiti — including “666” — on its walls.

With all of this in mind, Rowan Williams will, no doubt, fit in nicely in his new post as master of Magdalene College at the University of Cambridge

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in General* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

3 Comments
Posted March 22, 2012 at 5:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

My...reaction is that though everyone is being very complimentary about his time at Canterbury — “As a man of great learning and humility,” said David Cameron, “he has guided the church through times of challenge and change. He has sought to unite different communities and offer a profoundly humane sense of moral leadership that was respected by people of all faiths and none” — despite all that, actually he has been a much greater disaster than was actually necessary. He hasn’t “guided” the Church of England at all. He has lurched, with it, from one crisis to another, as often as not making things a lot worse. He is supposed to be a distinguished theologian (a proposition about which there is, to say the least, more than one view) and also a man of integrity: but he has consistently failed to handle crises with any theological coherence (theology, incidentally, is supposed to clarify complex problems, not make them more obscure than they need be); and, as for integrity, instead of remaining true to his beliefs, he has sought to avoid conflict between opposing views in his Church not by attempting to convince those he believes are wrong but by retreating in the face of internal political pressure, sometimes changing direction in mid-stream.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryEngland / UK

0 Comments
Posted March 21, 2012 at 6:30 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Against the background of increased anticipation of a black Archbishop of Canterbury, a backlash appears to be in full swing to deny Sentamu this appointment. Put simply, will the British Crown follow due process and Episcopal order and allow a Blackman head the Church?

Seven years ago, a black Catholic priest, Nigerian-born Cardinal Francis Arinze, was shortlisted as a possible successor of the late Pope John Paul II. But after the emission of an inexplicable black and white smoke, Arinze was dropped and the present Pope, Pope Benedict VI, was (s)elected as the pope.

According to theweek.co.uk, insiders regard the Ugandan-born Archbishop as too old, too undiplomatic and too ill. His.. [traditional] posture though applauded by the larger church, may also count against him.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* International News & CommentaryAfrica

6 Comments
Posted March 21, 2012 at 6:15 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Not everyone had the capacity of the willingness to suffer through the audio, and now through the kindness of some very hard working individuals you can read a transcript if you are interested.

You may find part one there and part two is here.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Analysis- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Episcopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Departing ParishesTEC Parishes* By KendallSermons & Teachings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish Ministry* TheologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral TheologyTheology: Scripture

1 Comments
Posted March 20, 2012 at 5:45 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Part one is here and part two is there. You are encouraged to take the time to listen to (suffer through?) it all.

Please note--these are both audio files. The time begins with a short Q and A to introduce me to those present before the questions shift to the subject at hand. Note, too that Bishop Kee Sloan of Alabama was invited by the Dean, Frank Limehouse, to come, which he (graciously) chose to do. During the time, Dean Limehouse invited Bishop Sloan to speak, and he chose to do so. This covers a wide range of recent events/developments and will be of broad interest to many blog readers--KSH.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Analysis- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican Church in North America (ACNA)Episcopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC Data* By KendallSermons & Teachings* Christian Life / Church LifeParish MinistryAdult EducationMinistry of the LaityMinistry of the OrdainedStewardship* Culture-WatchLaw & Legal Issues* TheologyChristologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral Theology

5 Comments
Posted February 27, 2012 at 6:32 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Take the time to go through them all as your schedule permits.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: Analysis- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)* South Carolina* Theology

5 Comments
Posted January 24, 2012 at 10:37 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

unfortunately, there is another issue that has been made public; it is now part of the historical record: Chuck Murphy and eight AMIA bishops have removed themselves from Rwandan oversight, having done so for no particular theological or biblical reason. The issues are both personal and ecstatic. By personal, I mean personality conflicts. By ecstatic, I mean that the only spiritual reason given for the departure was Chuck Murphy’s sense that the Lord had told him personally that he was like Moses leading people out of Egypt: “I must now say … that I believe that the Lord’s present word to me (and to us) now directs me to look beyond Genesis chapters 39-45, and on into the Book of Exodus…. that Africa (Egypt) could no longer be viewed as [AMIA’s] lasting home…. Things have now been made very clear to me” [letter of Dec. 5, 2011 to Archbishop Rwaje].

I think it critical in such times that we say what a thing is–only the truth will set us free. And this thing that happened has a name: schism. All the AMIA bishops who have resigned are schismatics.

This is a hard sentence to write and to read, because these are otherwise godly men, whose leadership we have admired. Some we call friends and colleagues. But there is no other word to describe what they’ve done other than the word schism.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of Rwanda* Religion News & CommentaryOther Churches* TheologyEcclesiologyEthics / Moral TheologyPastoral Theology

4 Comments
Posted December 22, 2011 at 6:35 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

At this point it is hard to know what to make of this - well, let's call it what it is, a spiritual mess - and to know exactly how to unring the many bells that have now already been rung. I will note for the record that I am a bishop of CANA/Nigeria and of the ACNA, and that as President of the AAC, my organization is comprised of AMiA and non-AMiA members, and I will further note that at GAFCON, MaryAnne and I chose to ride on the bus that had all AMiA (except us) members on board, because we enjoy their company. When AMiA decided to move from ACNA member status to "mission partner" status, I was disappointed in the distancing that I felt.

With all of this said, I first sensed alarm when the letter of the Washington, DC AMiA members was posted publicly, as it gave evidence that all was not well in the Anglican Mission, as it is currently called. Then additional letters, most of which have been posted on Stand Firm in Faith or TitusOneNine websites began to come in, some from Rwanda, and some from Chairman Murphy in response. There has been a communications train wreck unfolding in slow motion. It would seem that Rwanda is not pleased with the new direction that +Chuck Murphy wishes to take the Mission, and in taking it out of Rwanda proper. They told him to stop his action and repent or resign from the AMiA chairmanship.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican ProvincesChurch of Rwanda* Religion News & CommentaryOther Churches

11 Comments
Posted December 12, 2011 at 12:11 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

But matters are proceeding apace. The world is changing. The Global South objected to the consecration of a gay bishop with a partner, but Gene Robinson is no longer alone in that category even in the US House of Bishops (If he ever really was...). They objected to the idea of bestowing a blessing on a same-sex couple, and yet now in many states of this Union, including our own, the church is not only bestowing its blessing, but either seriously considering or already solemnizing the civil status of marriage.

In short, the process of organic development is afoot, it is not going to stop, and reception is or isn’t happening as I speak. In the meantime, the mainstream via media of the Episcopal Church is steadily reasserting our understanding of our authority to vary— to live out the variety of rites in our own context, which is very different from that in much of the Global South. As I learned intimately and personally at the conversation I attended in South Africa just a few weeks ago. The people in those places represented at that conference are free to maintain their various rules and traditions, suitable as they are for their contexts. I will say more in the open discussion about the extent to which the friction between the North and South has been exacerbated by misunderstanding and misinformation. But it is my sincere hope that corrections to those misunderstandings, and better information, through the mandated listening process and the Continuing Indaba — in both of which I have been involved — will assist to lessen the friction and perhaps even help calm the storms that have swept through our beloved Anglican Communion — not just the issue, but the issues behind the issues of Anglican disunion.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryAnglican CovenantAnglican IdentityEpiscopal Church (TEC)Global South Churches & PrimatesInstruments of UnitySexuality Debate (in Anglican Communion)Same-sex blessingsWindsor Report / Process* TheologyEcclesiology

16 Comments
Posted November 16, 2011 at 4:17 pm [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]

Posted by Kendall Harmon

The developing impasse between the diocese and the canonical instruments of General Convention is a tragedy in the making. It is very possible that the result will be the unnecessary loss of dozens of parishes and tens of thousands of Episcopalians. It is a moment to take stock and to recall the purpose of the canon law of the church. The canon law of the church has the peace of the church as its ultimate aim. The course of justice will be perverted if this new and arguably unconstitutional canon is used as an instrument by those of a majority opinion to gain the upper hand over those with whom they disagree. These proceedings threaten to reduce to the vanishing point the ground from which any future reconciliation might grow.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Anglican - Episcopal- Anglican: CommentaryEpiscopal Church (TEC)TEC BishopsTEC ConflictsTEC Conflicts: South CarolinaTEC Diocesan Conventions/Diocesan CouncilsTEC Polity & Canons

1 Comments
Posted October 27, 2011 at 5:19 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]




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