A New Diplomatic Order in Pakistan

Posted by Kendall Harmon

If it was not yet clear to Washington that a new political order prevailed here, the three-day visit this week by America’s chief diplomat dealing with Pakistan should put any doubt to rest.

The visit by Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte turned out to be series of indignities and chilly, almost hostile, receptions as he bore the brunt of the full range of complaints that Pakistanis now feel freer to air with the end of military rule by Washington’s favored ally, President Pervez Musharraf.

Faced with a new democratic lineup that is demanding talks, not force, in the fight against terrorism, Mr. Negroponte publicly swallowed a bitter pill at his final news conference on Thursday, acknowledging that there would now be some real differences in strategy between the United States and Pakistan.

He was upbraided at an American Embassy residence during a reception in his honor by lawyers furious that the Bush administration had refused to support the restoration of the dismissed judiciary by Mr. Musharraf last year.

Mr. Negroponte once told Congress that Mr. Musharraf was an “indispensable” ally, but the diplomat was finally forced to set some distance after months of standing stolidly by his friend. Mr. Musharraf’s future, he said, would be settled by Pakistan’s new democratic government.

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Filed under: * International News & CommentaryAsiaPakistan

1 Comments
Posted March 28, 2008 at 7:28 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]



1. Alice Linsley wrote:

I do hope that Washington gets its act together in regards to Pakistan.  Meanwhile serious persecution of Pakistani Christians continues and it doesn’t help that Pakistanis perceive of Christians as aligned with the West.

March 29, 4:10 pm | [comment link]
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