Study cited for health-cost cuts overstated Its Upside, critics say

Posted by Kendall Harmon

(Please note that the title above is from the print edition--KSH)

But while the research compiled in the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care has been widely interpreted as showing the country’s best and worst care, the Dartmouth researchers themselves acknowledged in interviews that in fact it mainly shows the varying costs of care in the government’s Medicare program. Measures of the quality of care are not part of the formula.

For all anyone knows, patients could be dying in far greater numbers in hospitals in the beige regions than hospitals in the brown ones, and Dartmouth’s maps would not pick up that difference. As any shopper knows, cheaper does not always mean better.

Even Dartmouth’s claims about which hospitals and regions are cheapest may be suspect. The principal argument behind Dartmouth’s research is that doctors in the Upper Midwest offer consistently better and cheaper care than their counterparts in the South and in big cities, and if Southern and urban doctors would be less greedy and act more like ones in Minnesota, the country would be both healthier and wealthier.

Read it all from Thursday's New York Times.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchEducationHealth & Medicine--The 2009 American Health Care Reform Debate* Economics, PoliticsPolitics in GeneralHouse of RepresentativesOffice of the PresidentPresident Barack ObamaSenate

1 Comments
Posted June 4, 2010 at 8:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]



1. Dale Rye wrote:

In fact, there is a pretty high correlation between the areas with the unhealthiest residents and those with the highest health costs. Imagine that!

June 4, 10:51 am | [comment link]
Registered members must log in to comment.




Next entry (above): Church Times—Some Church of England Clergy face forging of papers and fake brides

Previous entry (below): Canadian Anglicans aim to defuse gay-marriage issue

Return to blog homepage

Return to Mobile view (headlines)