(Telegraph) Twitter users invited to help choose the new Archbishop of Canterbury

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Having wrestled with the best way to choose a new leader, the Church of England has decided to use the social networking site Twitter. It will also seek the views of people of all faiths and none, from the Chief Rabbi to Professor Richard Dawkins.

For the first time in history, the long and usually private process will begin with a widespread public consultation, to be finished by the end of May.

The Crown Nominations Commission, which must present the Prime Minister with two possible successors to Dr Rowan Williams, will also ask for contributions from “senior figures in other faiths, the secular world and the life of the nation”.

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Filed under: * Anglican - EpiscopalArchbishop of Canterbury Anglican ProvincesChurch of England (CoE)* Culture-WatchBlogging & the Internet--Social Networking

3 Comments
Posted March 27, 2012 at 5:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]



1. robroy wrote:

I don’t tweet, but can I put ++ Greg Venable’s on the hat?

March 27, 11:22 am | [comment link]
2. billqs wrote:

This is particularly cynical, especially if there is any claim to the tweets as “representative of the public opinion at large.”  Tweets are no more representative than online polls that anyone can participate in.  They are easily hijacked by motivated partisans and as a result these partisan views appear to have more validity than they should be granted.

March 28, 10:41 am | [comment link]
3. BlueOntario wrote:

It will also seek the views of people of all faiths and none, from the Chief Rabbi to Professor Richard Dawkins.

...will also ask for contributions from “senior figures in other faiths, the secular world and the life of the nation”.

What a very, um, “tolerant” method to pick the leader of a Christian church.

So bizarre.

March 28, 8:38 pm | [comment link]
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