(Harvard Divinity Today) David Hempton—Religious Illiteracy Matters

Posted by Kendall Harmon

[Finally, let me say a word about]... the wider world. Peter Berger has stated that secularization, far from being an inexorable product of modernity throughout the world, is more or less confined to Western and Central Europe and what he calls “an international cultural elite.” In the rest of the world vibrant religious cultures are the default position, not the exception. I see this gap between secularized cultural elites and global religious traditions as potentially one of the most dangerous things in our world. The consequences need to be thought about, especially since research universities like ours recruit most of our faculty and students from Berger’s secularized minorities. We need to know about this gap, how it works, and what its consequences are.

Stephen Prothero has stated that “The United States is one of the most religious places on earth, but it is also a nation of shocking religious illiteracy”—even among college students. We have already paid a heavy price for this ignorance, and we dare not let it go unattended. We have serious work to do at Harvard and beyond to improve religious literacy in this country and in the wider world.

Finally, a flashback to Northern Ireland in 1969–70. That was the year I went to Queen’s University Belfast as a young undergraduate. I was a typical child of the 1960s, more interested in sport, music, and girls than understanding the religious and political dynamics of my own culture. All hell broke loose in Northern Ireland in those years, with hundreds of people a year dying in violent incidents in the early 1970s. Like Prothero’s religious illiterates, I really didn’t know what was going on. I should have. I vowed I would find out. That’s why I’m standing here today. Religious illiteracy matters; we ignore it at our peril. Let’s take it on.

Read it all.

Filed under: * Culture-WatchGlobalizationReligion & Culture* International News & CommentaryAmerica/U.S.A.England / UK--Ireland* Religion News & CommentaryOther Faiths* TheologySeminary / Theological Education

1 Comments
Posted September 27, 2012 at 7:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]



1. mbgentsch wrote:

Harvard, that “bastion of The-Halls-of-Mordred theology” made a good choice.  I hope he is a good administrator.  The profs there may not always be right about everything—what denizens of any academic institution are, particularly when populated with variant views?—but they are intrepid.  Good on ‘em.

September 28, 9:23 pm | [comment link]
Registered members must log in to comment.




Next entry (above): (The Gospel Coalition) Brian Hedges—Preachers and Their Critics

Previous entry (below): The Guardian’s interactive guide: pick your own Archbishop of Canterbury

Return to blog homepage

Return to Mobile view (headlines)