(NYT) Not ‘Lone Wolves’ After All: How ISIS Is Guiding Terror Plots From Afar

Posted by Kendall Harmon

Until just moments before the arrest of the Indian cell, here last June, the Islamic State’s cyberplanners kept in near-constant touch with the men, according to the interrogation records of three of the eight suspects obtained by The New York Times.

As officials around the world have faced a confusing barrage of attacks dedicated to the Islamic State, cases like Mr. [Mohammed Ibrahim] Yazdani’s offer troubling examples of what counterterrorism experts are calling enabled or remote-controlled attacks: violence conceived and guided by operatives in areas controlled by the Islamic State whose only connection to the would-be attacker is the internet.

In the most basic enabled attacks, Islamic State handlers acted as confidants and coaches, coaxing recruits to embrace violence. In the Hyderabad plot, among the most involved found so far, the terrorist group reached deep into a country with strict gun laws in order to arrange for pistols and ammunition to be left in a bag swinging from the branches of a tree.

For the most part, the operatives who are conceiving and guiding such attacks are doing so from behind a wall of anonymity.

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Filed under: * Culture-WatchBlogging & the InternetScience & TechnologyViolence* Economics, PoliticsDefense, National Security, MilitaryTerrorism* TheologyAnthropologyEthics / Moral Theology

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Posted February 4, 2017 at 10:00 am [Printer Friendly] [Print w/ comments]
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