RECENT COMMENTS

By Terry Tee on January 17, 2017 at 7:00 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (BBC) Church 'deeply distressed' by Koran offence, says Scottish primus

No one reading the BBC report would understand the gravity of the passage read. The vague reference to the Virgin Birth might seem a technicality to many readers, whereas in fact, as readers of this blog know, the passage cited was a direct refutation of the divinity of Our Lord.



By Undergroundpewster on January 17, 2017 at 1:20 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Isabelle Hamley licensed as Archbishop of Canterbury's Chaplain

“Isabelle is in the final stages of a PhD in Biblical studies, (Relational identity, Otherness and Victimisation: An Irigarayan Reading of Judges 19-21)”

I posted about this back in November. It is disturbing that the new chaplain to the AbofC is reading Irigaray into scripture. One wonders if she is a devotee.

“Irigaray alleges that women have been traditionally associated with matter and nature to the expense of a female subject position. While women can become subjects if they assimilate to male subjectivity, a separate subject position for women does not exist. Irigaray’s goal is to uncover the absence of a female subject position, the relegation of all things feminine to nature/matter, and, ultimately, the absence of true sexual difference in Western culture. In addition to establishing this critique, Irigaray offers suggestions for altering the situation of women in Western culture. Mimesis, strategic essentialism, utopian ideals, and employing novel language, are but some of the methods central to changing contemporary culture.”



By Marie Blocher on January 16, 2017 at 10:20 am [comment link]
From the entry: Kendall Harmon's 2017 Epiphany Sermon--Who are We anyway? Are we are Resumés? (Matthew 3:13-17)

Perhaps you meant
Are we OUR Resumés?



By Katherine on January 15, 2017 at 10:33 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Scottish Primus David Chillingworth's Statement regarding the Koran reading in St Mary’s Cathedral

In Ralph’s first link, the cathedral provost thinks it’s fine because they’ve done it before, as have others.  That really doesn’t excuse it.  He doesn’t understand the distinction between being glad that Muslims are willing to attend Christian services and inviting the recitation of a passage from the Qur’an asserting the virgin birth of Jesus but specifically denying his divinity.  Inviting Muslims to experience Christian worship and visiting Eid festivities in a neighborly way are fine.  Permitting a non-Christian, indeed, anti-Christian, reading at a Eucharist is not fine.



By Katherine on January 15, 2017 at 9:41 pm [comment link]
From the entry: "Clutching the blood-stained Bible she had with her" A local paper story on Roof Trials end

May God continue to be with this faithful woman, and may Roof repent and believe.



By Pb on January 15, 2017 at 4:57 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Scottish Primus David Chillingworth's Statement regarding the Koran reading in St Mary’s Cathedral

How about reaching out to Wicca?



By Ralph on January 15, 2017 at 4:48 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Scottish Primus David Chillingworth's Statement regarding the Koran reading in St Mary’s Cathedral

A bit of internet searching reveals that the cathedral provost knew what he was doing and is unrepentant:
http://thurible.net/2017/01/13/keeping-the-faith/

He’s no stranger to controversy:
http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13070512.Church_invites_pro_gay_Catholics_to_join_service/

He’s openly homosexual and supports same-sex ‘marriage’:
http://www.scotsman.com/news/senior-cleric-comes-out-for-gay-weddings-in-church-1-1354380



By Ralph on January 15, 2017 at 9:32 am [comment link]
From the entry: Scottish Primus David Chillingworth's Statement regarding the Koran reading in St Mary’s Cathedral

A well-written statement, as far as it goes. “Friendship, understanding and mutual respect” are well and good, as long as it’s truly mutual. The decision to read those heretical and blasphemous passages is hardly friendly, clearly does not show understanding, and goes far beyond disrespectful.



By Milton Finch on January 14, 2017 at 12:33 am [comment link]
From the entry: Qur’an in the Eucharist? The Provost of Glasgow Cathedral subverts Christian revelation

Judaism represents the written law.  Christianity writes that law on the hearts of humanity.  Islam…well…attempts to tell us that the law on the outside is worth more than the Spiritual written law on the inside.



By Ralph on January 13, 2017 at 9:02 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Qur’an in the Eucharist? The Provost of Glasgow Cathedral subverts Christian revelation

In the context of interfaith dialogue, this is the only thing that a Christian can say to a Muslim. The response will initially be, “Let’s talk about what we have in common,” but invariably the response is, “Jesus is not God.” This stuff swirls around all the time, particularly at Christmas.



By Milton Finch on January 13, 2017 at 1:17 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Qur’an in the Eucharist? The Provost of Glasgow Cathedral subverts Christian revelation

Katherine, the translation is “Jesus is God”.



By Katherine on January 12, 2017 at 7:59 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Qur’an in the Eucharist? The Provost of Glasgow Cathedral subverts Christian revelation

Ralph, can you translate that Arabic, please?



By Ralph on January 12, 2017 at 7:47 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Qur’an in the Eucharist? The Provost of Glasgow Cathedral subverts Christian revelation

يسوع هو الله



By Katherine on January 12, 2017 at 4:44 pm [comment link]
From the entry: South Carolina Jury sentences Dylann Roof to death for Emanuel AME Church massacre

I finally saw an answer to my question.  SC prosecutors did charge Roof with nine counts of murder, and scheduled trial to begin Jan. 17.  However, federal prosecutors jumped in and scheduled an earlier trial on the federal hate crimes charges, so the SC trial was postponed.  Whether it will be held is now under discussion.  This sounds backwards to me.  The primary crime is the murders.



By Luke on January 12, 2017 at 1:08 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Nunn--The Blessing of the Bells at the Cathedral in Southwark

Thank you, elves…
God’s blessings…



By Katherine on January 11, 2017 at 9:20 pm [comment link]
From the entry: South Carolina Jury sentences Dylann Roof to death for Emanuel AME Church massacre

Pageantmaster, I can see your arguments; however, Roof was determined to be competent to stand trial, and therefore had the right to refuse counsel, which he did. 

What I want to know, and no one has yet explained to me, is why he was tried first in federal court on the “hate crimes” charges.  It seems to me that the case of the murders of nine innocents in South Carolina should have been tried first.  Surely the lives themselves were more important than the hate charges.



By Terry Tee on January 11, 2017 at 8:55 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Elizaphanian) Sam Norton--What’s really wrong with the C of E House of Bishops

I think there is a problem here: What the Bishops have failed to do is articulate a coherent narrative, not about what Christianity is in general and as a whole, but what Christianity means for the English people at this point in our national life.
But what does it mean to be English? A large part of the population of multi-cultural London, for example, I would say feels British but not quite English. There is reference also here to the English nation. In the past there was a sense of the Church of England articulating the values of the English nation: the C of E epitomised the English virtues of tolerance, decency, duty, steadfastness, all of them interpreted in the light of our faith in Jesus Christ. Perhaps allied to a certain reticence.

Now we are a more complex people in many ways, and the sense of a state church as our default religious setting does not make sense in the way that it used to do. Perhaps the choice is, after all, as Martyn Percy discerned it - between a state church/folk religion on the one hand, and a more Christ-centred, evangelistic and doctrinally certain church on the other. In the latter case, it is the corps of faith and mission that holds the members, not a birthright or attempt to be all things to all people.



By MichaelA on January 11, 2017 at 4:52 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lee Gatiss--A Tribute to Mike Ovey (1958-2017)

Mike Ovey has been a quiet achiever in the rejuvenation of Anglicanism (and Christianity generally) in the UK.  Under his wise and encouraging leadership, Oak Hill has become the leading provider of ministers to bible-believing Christian churches.  He was low-key in his approach, but firmly grounded in the scriptures and common-sense.

We pray that his family will be comforted in their grief, and that the Lord will raise up another great leader to carry on his work and extend it.

Good to see Mike Gatiss giving this eulogy also - under his leadership, Church Society has worked more closely with other orthodox evangelical Anglican groups, including Oak Hill, Reform and AMiE.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 11, 2017 at 10:36 am [comment link]
From the entry: Oak Hill College Principal Mike Ovey RIP

Shockingly young - less than two years older than I am.  I am sorry to hear this news and thoughts and prayers are with his family, colleagues and friends.  He has made a remarkable impression on and left a fine legacy to the church.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 11, 2017 at 10:09 am [comment link]
From the entry: South Carolina Jury sentences Dylann Roof to death for Emanuel AME Church massacre

Mother Emmanuel has been an inspiration in the way its dear people have given a Christian response to the violence wreaked on them and their families.  May they find peace and healing knowing the presence of him who blesses those who mourn among them.

This report concerns me:

During his closing argument earlier in the day, he passed on the chance to argue for his life
...
Roof, who chose to represent himself during the penalty phase, had been an enigma through most of the trial. He spent most of his days staring at the table in front of him or shuffling papers. He didn’t cross-examine any of the government’s witnesses and chose to put on no defense of his own. He rested his case on Monday without calling a single witness or offering a shred of evidence in his behalf.

He indicated at the outset that he had taken the reins of his defense to prevent his accomplished legal team from introducing evidence about his psychological history, though he insisted he has no mental illness or anything to hide.

I read previously that Roof’s lawyers were so concerned that they wanted to put his mental state and history before the jury, something which the judge denied in the face of Roof’s opposition.

Is this a safe way of proceeding?  Shouldn’t the jury have known about the possible mental issues?

He did little in his closing argument to cast a different light on his actions, opting to address the jury with a disjointed and convoluted statement that lasted less than five minutes

Quite.  Having insisted on conducting his own defence both in relation to guilt and sentencing, he made no attempt to defend himself, and what he did do he made a complete hash of: “disjointed and convoluted” was the way it was described.

It worries me having anyone facing criminal sanction without legal representation, and this is particularly so on a capital charge.  That is independent of the strength of the case against that person.  Sometimes the mentally questionable need the protection of the law and its procedures [designed to give safe convictions], even against themselves.



By MichaelA on January 11, 2017 at 9:41 am [comment link]
From the entry: South Carolina Jury sentences Dylann Roof to death for Emanuel AME Church massacre

May God have mercy on him and turn his heart to repentance before he has to face his maker.



By MichaelA on January 10, 2017 at 4:37 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Oak Hill College Principal Mike Ovey RIP

Oak Hill has become arguably the most influential seminary in Britain. Not esteemed by the establishment, yet it turns out large numbers of committed and anointed ministers for many churches.  Under Mike Hill’s leadership, it maintained its focus on the gospel.

He will be sorely missed.  We pray for his family and ask that the Lord raise up someone with a similar anointing to carry on his work.



By MichaelA on January 10, 2017 at 4:34 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Elizaphanian) Sam Norton--What’s really wrong with the C of E House of Bishops

Thanks for the link to this article.

Mr Norton’s last paragraph encapsulates the systemic problem which the Church of England has.  He notes that the CofE needs prophetic leaders who see Christianity as of primary importance for Britain, but that:

“Such a person could never get through the selection process to become a Bishop of course. Such is the nature of the problem we face.”



By Kendall Harmon on January 10, 2017 at 10:15 am [comment link]
From the entry: (ESPN) Clemson fulfills its promise by beating its model, Alabama

What a great game and what a final quarter.



By MichaelA on January 9, 2017 at 5:41 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Greg Hillis--Cyril of Alexandria's Understanding of the Baptism of Jesus

“Cyril describes the fall, not as a descent into depravity and sinfulness, but as a loss of the Holy Spirit.”

Which is interesting, but I don’t think the scriptures ever suggest that the fall of man resulted in the loss of the Holy Spirit.  Rather, they suggest pretty clearly that it resulted in sin and death: “So then as through one transgression there resulted condemnation to all men, even so through one act of righteousness there resulted justification of life to all men. For as through the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous.” [Romans 5:18-19]

The Book of Common Prayer of course refers to baptism as marking the coming of the Holy Spirit, but relates this integrally to our sin, and our need to be delivered from it:

“...that thou wilt mercifully look upon these thy servants; wash them and sanctify them with the Holy Ghost, that they, being delivered from thy wrath, may be received into the ark of Christ’s Church; and being stedfast in faith, joyful through hope, and rooted in charity, may so pass the waves of this troublesome world, that finally they may come to the land of everlasting life”.

Baptism is indeed a renewal.  But one cannot take the references to sin out of it, at least not if we want to be true to Christian teaching.



By MichaelA on January 6, 2017 at 11:33 pm [comment link]
From the entry: An Epiphany sermon by English Abbot Ælfric of Eynsham

Glorious now behold him arise
King and God and sacrifice!



By MichaelA on January 6, 2017 at 11:31 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Harmon Family Picture for Christmas 2106/17

Happy Epiphany!



By Katherine on January 6, 2017 at 9:23 am [comment link]
From the entry: Recent Key Entries 2016

You are quite right about the natures of those sites, MichaelA.  T19 is on the same server, as I understand it, and the other two (of which I know) which are technically related have suffered serious damage from some kind of virus or hack.



By MichaelA on January 6, 2017 at 2:17 am [comment link]
From the entry: Recent Key Entries 2016

Hi Katherine, thanks, good points.

I wouldn’t call Midwest Conservative Journal an Anglican blog.  It’s a political blog done from a Christian viewpoint.  Of course it refers to matter going on in the various churches, including Anglicans, but that is just consequential to the main issue which is politics.

By contrast, an Anglican blog will be focussed mainly on church issues (and mainly but not always Anglican), but of course will cover related political issues from time to time.  Obvious examples are Virtue Online, Anglican Ink and Anglican Down Under (I am not saying I necessarily agree with each of them, but just talking about the type of blog they are).  A similar one from a reformed viewpoint is The Gospel Coalition.  Sure they cover political issues, but the primary focus is on church issues, mainly (but not always) Anglican.

Stand Firm was an Anglican blog up until after Greg Griffiths left.  Its now far more like MCJ - the articles are mainly on US political issues from a Christian perspective.  It still does some Anglican content.  The last Anglican article was back in October,

A Christian political blog like MCJ or SF is a worthy thing, but my comments above referred to an Anglican blog, which it appears to me that T19 has always been.

And I hope that the main focus of my comments, i.e. that articles on Anglican blogs could highlight the positive and practical side of Anglican growth and renewal, will not be overlooked.



By Kendall Harmon on January 5, 2017 at 9:01 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Harmon Family Picture for Christmas 2106/17

Merry last day of Christmas to all!



By Katherine on January 5, 2017 at 5:08 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Recent Key Entries 2016

At this point it appears T19 is lucky to be up and running normally.  Stand Firm is still not quite fixed, since the “recent comments” column doesn’t work, and Midwest Conservative Journal (on the same server, I think) is frozen, not being updated and not accepting comments.



By MichaelA on January 5, 2017 at 6:19 am [comment link]
From the entry: Recent Key Entries 2016

My apologies for putting this post here, its a bit off topic.  I saw an article on T19 around New Years Day, but can’t find it now.  I was in the outback of Australia and couldn’t reply at the time.  Fr Terry Tee and Pageantmaster both commented on the decline in Anglican blogs.  I will throw my two cents worth in here, if permitted:

1.  Fr Tee wrote something about the fork in the road being passed and I agree.  TEC’s decline isn’t news any more and most faithful people are out of it. 

2. But there is another story, a positive one, about the re-establishment of Anglicanism in North America, independently of TEC. Its the story of ACNA, Dio SC and the Continuum churches (apologies if I have missed out on anyone).  It is the story of pastors, new churches (often struggling), evangelists, seminaries, and difficult cultural challenges.

3. I suspect there is the potential to build just as much interest in this positive story as there was in the previous negative story.  The task after all is immense and varied - Anglicanism has practically disappeared from many areas of North America and Great Britain with the declines of TEC, ACoC and CofE, and its now missionary work to re-establish it.

4.  This is in context of my belief that Anglicanism is a vibrant denomination with a great deal to offer to Christianity today.  The intellectual and theological potential is huge, and this should be highlighted on the internet.

5. As a reminder, although Stand Firm now rarely carries Anglican articles, I can remember when an article there about Anglican doctrine and the direction in which Anglicanism should be headed could attract over 500 comments.  That is an extreme example, but its a reminder that its just a matter of finding the relevance.

6.  Titus One Nine has a separate technical issue:  It only has a single column for articles on its front page, and the articles cycle through so quickly that nobody gets time to absorb them.  They are usually gone from the front page in a day.  “Sticky posts” don’t really help because they just reduce the space available for the other articles, hence they cycle through even more quickly.  If you want comment and to build an online community, then an article should sit on the front page for several days at least.

7.  Two ways for T19 to deal with this, in my humble submission: (a) Find someone to re-configure the page, with main articles, a cache where older articles are still visible even when not recent, and side spaces or links where articles on particular interest areas can go; and (b) reduce the number of articles.

I hope this is helpful, and wherever the Lord leads each of you, may your ministry be blessed.



By Katherine on January 4, 2017 at 9:19 am [comment link]
From the entry: More Music for Christmas 2016/7--Alison Krauss, Yo-Yo Ma - The Wexford Carol

Beautiful, beautiful!  Thank you.



By oursonpolaire on January 3, 2017 at 10:55 am [comment link]
From the entry: A Prayer for the Feast Day of Samuel Azariah

It might be better if the collect celebrated Samuel Azariah as the first Anglican India-born bishop.  By 1945 there had been well over a dozen RC Indian bishops consecrated, mostly for the Syro-Malabar and Syro-Malankar Catholic churches, but also for the Latin church (e.g., Joseph Atipetty, who was made Coadjutor Archbishop of Verapoly in 1932.  Most of the Oriental Orthodox bishops had been sent out from Chaldea and Syria for 17 or 18 centuries until the 1940s—as far as I know they had no India-born bishops until around WWII.



By Katherine on January 2, 2017 at 8:54 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blessed and Happy New Year of 2017 to All Blog Readers!

A good and productive year for all, and many blessings.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 1, 2017 at 11:39 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blessed and Happy New Year of 2017 to All Blog Readers!

When a man is tired of T19, he is tired of life, Fr Tee?

[with apologies to Samuel Johnson]

Happy New Year!



By Terry Tee on January 1, 2017 at 1:59 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blessed and Happy New Year of 2017 to All Blog Readers!

Thank you Kendall, and may the blessings of God be on your and your family in the year ahead.

I have been struck as I am sure others have been, by the declining number of people commenting on entries in the blog. For instance, when you invited descriptions of how Christmas was spent, where and with whom, there were some lovely descriptions that made me feel part of an online community. This Christmas I think we only rustled up three contributions.

Some fabled figures have faded away (Statmann, for instance). I am glad to see PageantMaster from time to time. But it seems to me that the intensity of interest in the information that you put before us has diminished, no doubt because the time for choosing the fork in the road has past. One way or another, folk have decided where and how to continue their Christian pilgrimage. Let the reader understand. I shall continue to drop in to catch up with the news, and the issues that begot this site are not entirely in the past. Overall, I am grateful to Kendall and the Elves for their Christian hospitality in this place, and for their ministry of witness to the gospel truth.



By Luke on December 30, 2016 at 6:26 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christmas Bells

I don’t recall ever seeing the ending verses transiting down deep into agony and despair, then arising as our Savior did, into glory.

Thanks so much for the story and the poem.



By Terry Tee on December 26, 2016 at 2:32 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Open Thread: What does Christmas mean to you this year?

Kind comments by parishioners in their cards greatly moved me, to tears actually. But as I am on the brink of 70, I wonder how much longer I can carry on, in fact it is a question that asks itself each day. I know that Christmas has been made grossly material and indulgent and trivialized (see for example British Telecom advertizing something called Giftmas, as if there was no problem in eliding the holy name). And yet. And yet. Each year I think we glimpse something of why Christianity is so special, something that explains why ‘the heathen rage’because they envy this, a glimpse of God among us, God with us, God gently touching our heart-strings and calling us back to a simplicity and a trust.

I put a note in the church newsletter inviting anybody who would be on their own to join me at the festive table and lo, ten of us sat down to demolish turkey and the usual fare of the season. A cross-section of ages, we enjoyed each other’s company. Deo Gratias.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 25, 2016 at 7:49 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Open Thread: What does Christmas mean to you this year?

This year, there is an empty chair at the dining table, and there is a mixture of sadness and hopeful thankfulness.  This pretty much sums it up.



By Undergroundpewster on December 25, 2016 at 6:56 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Open Thread: What does Christmas mean to you this year?

Midnight mass with the small Anglican congregation in the next town. Enthusiastic congregational singing was the highlight. Today we had the neighbors and their children over for Christmas dinner.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 25, 2016 at 6:14 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Archbishop of Canterbury’s 2016 Christmas sermon

Not much Christmas cheer ‘ere.  Suicide is painless.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 25, 2016 at 6:12 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Queen's Christmas Broadcast 2016

Inspiring and focused Christian message as usual about the God of small things and small beginnings and how they can grow in His shade.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 25, 2016 at 6:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: O Magnum Mysterium - Morten Lauridsen

Lovely.



By Br. Michael on December 24, 2016 at 12:02 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A Great anecdote about General Mattis at Christmas from Mark Shields

Well, I would suggest that each church that agrees with this stop using fossil fuels immediately and all sources of energy that use those fuels.  That would include turning off all heat and electricity and getting rid of all petroleum based materials.



By Terry Tee on December 23, 2016 at 11:35 am [comment link]
From the entry: Church of England makes late bid for Christmas advert of the year with "GoggleBox Vicar"

As someone equally frazzled and exhausted at Christmas for the same reasons as her, I enjoyed this. However, Fr Terry Pedantic-Tee notes that the vicar was also too rushed to change the altar frontal from Advent purple to Christmas white or gold. Tut!



By Terry Tee on December 23, 2016 at 11:29 am [comment link]
From the entry: (BBC) The Prince of Wales offers Thought for the Day on Religious Persecution

It’s good to have high-profile support. And yet this message troubles me. Spot the missing words: Muslim, Islam, jihadist. It may be an uncomfortable truth, but if we look at the persecution mentioned by the prince, nearly all of it is at the hands of Islamist extremists. But to say this would spoil the effect of ‘“let’s all get on together”. To say this would risk charges of Islamophobia. To say this unsayable fact and to mention this unmentionable truth would be to risk charges, bizarrely, of inflaming religious tensions. Until we are prepared to acknowledge publicly what we all know privately, the persecution will increase. Only by mentioning this in public debate will we be able to encourage our own resident Muslim communities to reflect back through their own networks their anger at and repudiation of what is done in their name.



By sophy0075 on December 22, 2016 at 6:58 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg) Nobody Is Eating Out Anymore, They're Just Ordering Pizza

The reason fewer folks are eating out is that it’s too darned expensive. Contrary to what the Obama Administration would have the citizens of the US believe, the true unemployment rate is disastrous http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/susan-jones/americans-not-labor-force-participation-rate-risesdrops  And many of those who are employed are underemployed; they took low-paying jobs just to bring some money in, or have benefits. I know; my family are among them.



By David Keller on December 22, 2016 at 3:49 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg) Nobody Is Eating Out Anymore, They're Just Ordering Pizza

Can these people ever stop?  What “chilling effect of the presidential election”?  The stock market is up 1000 points since it was “chilled” off by Trump’s election.  I don’t give a rip what they think about the man—that’s their right; but don’t lie to me anymore.  It just is getting wearisome.



By Jim the Puritan on December 19, 2016 at 9:15 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A Daily Mail Article on what MAY be the next incremental step in the C of E on same-sex marriage

Nudge, nudge, wink, wink.


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