RECENT COMMENTS

By Pageantmaster ن [Pray for +John Ellison] on July 30, 2015 at 12:30 am [comment link]
From the entry: Smithsonian Science News: Jamestown skeletons identified as colony leaders

It looks like a tobacco or snuff box to me.  Catholic reliquary my foot.

And a bit of checking around reveals:

The Dutch, who named the ground powdered tobacco “snuff” (snuif), were using the product by 1560.[2] By the early 1600s, snuff had become an expensive luxury commodity.[2] In 1611, commercially manufactured snuff made its way to North America by way of John Rolfe, the husband of Pocahontas, who introduced a sweeter Spanish variety of tobacco to North America.



By Ralph Webb on July 29, 2015 at 11:39 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I’m currently reading Bishop (and former Nashotah dean) Donald Parsons’ A Lifetime Road to God, republished a few years back by The Parish Press. It’s a well-worth-reading overview of the Christian life. My wife Sharon is going down the rabbit hole to a book I read nearly a decade ago: Roman Catholic Bishop Fulton J. Sheen’s magnificent Life of Christ.



By tjmcmahon on July 29, 2015 at 7:07 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Porter: Shared Conversations will lead to CofE Synod Same Sex Legislation Change in February 2017

This is certainly consistent with Coward’s earlier report on meeting with Porter ( http://www.kendallharmon.net/t19/index.php/t19/article/58467 - you will need to use the “googlecached.pdf” link as the others have mysteriously disappeared)

“The intention is to change the tone of the conversation and take some of the toxicity out of it, acknowledging that there is no agreement between, say, us and Reform. David assumes there will be a fracture and when it happens, it will be small and done with profound sadness, with a measure of grace, disagreeing well. The Conversations are a process in which it is hoped to find grace in each other where there are profound disagreements. Maybe 80% of the C of E will hold together with
fractures at either end of the spectrum.”

Porter apparently assumes that most people in CoE, even most nominal conservatives, will accept formal SSB’s in church, just as nominal conservatives in TEC accepted them in 2009 (as long as “not in my backyard”).  I think Porter and Welby hope that the diehard progressives will ally themselves with TEC and start an “Episcopal Church in England”  while expecting the remaining traditionalists to opt for the AMiE.



By Luke on July 29, 2015 at 3:58 pm [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

5. Oh, yes, there’s no lack of creativity…Bottom line, though, was that DioUSC still didn’t get the $40M. And, as you tell it, it was a DioUSC decision to deprive the Camp of funding, no matter how they might rationalize it.



By David Keller on July 29, 2015 at 12:28 pm [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

#4—In Upper SC Christ Church withheld roughly $40K in 2004-5 which was NOT supposed to go to TEC. The 2006 Diocesan budget put the CC $40K into the budget of the Diocesan Camp and Conference Center.  One little problem—they cut the Diocesan contribution to the budget of Camp Gravatt by $40K and sent that $40K to TEC.  How creative.



By Robert Lundy on July 29, 2015 at 10:25 am [comment link]
From the entry: Porter: Shared Conversations will lead to CofE Synod Same Sex Legislation Change in February 2017

So just to be clear here, the leader of an alternative sexuality pressure group claims Justin Welby will push the gay agenda as far as possible in the CofE in February, 2017. IF THIS IS TRUE, the Primates of the Anglican Communion should know and appropriately respond. Also, IF THIS IS TRUE, every Christian in the Church of England should do everything possible to hold Justin Welby accountable.



By Luke on July 29, 2015 at 10:17 am [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

When we first tangled with this mindset at our old, ECUSA, parish, our initial step, personally and for the parish, was to stop sending any $$ to the Diocese.

This inflamed bishop Sauls to the point of wild accusations and reckless actions; it all culminated in St. Luke’s Anglican Church…see: stlukesmaysville.org



By IchabodKunkleberry on July 28, 2015 at 11:35 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Financial stuff. Anything authored or co-authored by Benjamin Graham.
These are :
  “Security Analysis” (with David Dodd)

  “The Intelligent Investor”

    “The Interpretation of Financial Statements” (with Spencer
Meredith).

None of them recent, Graham having died in 1976. All are classic.



By CSeitz-ACI on July 28, 2015 at 4:55 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Porter: Shared Conversations will lead to CofE Synod Same Sex Legislation Change in February 2017

It’s quite clear Mr Coward is fully opposed to anything like what David Porter is suggesting. He wants full equality in all realms, much as TEC will shortly have it (Advent 2015). It is important to grasp this if one is a conservative Christian. Any concession will be seen as a sign of second-class treatment. So one wonders what the point of Porter’s suggestion genuinely is? It breaks trust with the traditional position and also alienates those he believes, presumably, he is aiding. What he is offering they reject.



By Undergroundpewster on July 28, 2015 at 1:48 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Light reading. Just breezed through “The End of Eternity” by Asimov. Wonderfully politically incorrect in so many ways.



By CSeitz-ACI on July 28, 2015 at 12:31 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Archbishop Fisher: Same-Sex ‘Marriage': Evolution or Deconstruction of Marriage and the Family?

Very well done and with charity.



By Capt. Father Warren on July 28, 2015 at 11:13 am [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

There is one thing, and one thing only, holding the vestige of TEC together; the credible threat of devastating lawsuits funded with dead people’s money they still have on hand.

Plus, the money which parishes & then dioceses supply to the national church to finance the threat.

Bishops who bleat about biblical authority, worship in the faith once delivered to the saints BUT still send money to the national church are talking out of both sides of their mouths.



By David Keller on July 28, 2015 at 10:59 am [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

Underground—There is clearly a vibrant Anglican Communion, it just isn’t headquartered in Anglia/England anymore. I never really realized how insidious TEC was until I heard the story of a Rwandan bishop being told by TEC representatives to “tow the line” or be cut off financially, to which he replied “So; you actually think you can threaten me with poverty.” Things have worked out just fine for Rwanda and we in PEARUSA are working on a project to make them permanently self-funded.  That said, in thinking about a cleric who has stayed in TEC all this time and will now leave because of gay marriage, I am reminded of a story told to me a few years ago by an orthodox Anglo Catholic priest:  Two priests are standing in the back of the church and the rector comes to the pulpit and announces that General Convention has mandated human sacrifices and a baby will be sacrificed on the altar.  One priest turns to the other and says “One more thing and I’m outta here.”



By Undergroundpewster on July 28, 2015 at 10:20 am [comment link]
From the entry: [ACI] The New Episcopal Church: What Hath General Convention 2015 Wrought?

As members of the Communion have less and less in common with each other, guess what the result will be. Either a NAC (New Anglican Communion) or a dying Anglican Conglomeration of churches that are not truly in communion with each other. An Anglican Reconciliation seems unlikely.



By Karen B. on July 28, 2015 at 10:16 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Speaking of books, I just happened to notice that the Kindle version of one of my favorite books of all time is on sale today at Amazon - Joni Eareckson Tada’s A Place of Healing: Wrestling with the Mysteries of Suffering and God’s Sovereignty.

Can’t beat this for $0.99.  Really.  Highly Highly recommended.

http://www.amazon.com/Place-Healing-Wrestling-Mysteries-Sovereignty-ebook/dp/B005MT8U3S/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1438092543&sr=8-2&keywords=A+Place+of+Healing



By SC blu cat lady on July 27, 2015 at 2:52 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth: Judgment concludes trial-court phase

I am very glad that this judgement has been for Bishop Iker and the real diocese of Ft. Worth. It is no surprise that TEC is appealing. That is their strategy. I wonder if they will take this all the way to the Supreme Court of Texas. If they do, is TEC prepared for another beating? That could be devastating if the SC Supreme Court in Sept. rules in favor of the diocese and against the TEC rump group.



By Katherine on July 27, 2015 at 12:54 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Standard Kenya: Presidents Barack Obama and Uhuru Kenyatta differ over gay rights

It is sad to see how culturally insensitive Mr. Obama has been, while claiming to “respect” other cultures.  It’s the same here at home, of course; what the progressive left believes in is defined as the “correct” belief and others are condemned out of hand.



By Katherine on July 27, 2015 at 12:49 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth: Judgment concludes trial-court phase

They say another appeal is expected, although not likely to be successful, so it may take most of another year for this to be finally put to bed.



By magnolia on July 27, 2015 at 12:09 am [comment link]
From the entry: Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis

one of my all time faves. thanks elves!



By magnolia on July 27, 2015 at 12:08 am [comment link]
From the entry: Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth: Judgment concludes trial-court phase

yay! PTL!



By Ad Orientem on July 26, 2015 at 8:02 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Just some light reading…

“The Ancien Regime in Europe:Government and Society in the Major States 1648-1789”
- E. N. Williams



By CBH on July 26, 2015 at 3:07 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

My first summer reading was a result of the post: John Lennox Lecture, Against the Flow.  I read again the Book of Daniel in the KJV and studied it from the lecture’s perspective .  After the events of Charleston, I decided to read again To Kill a Mockingbird.  It has such significance at this time.  I have also read The Shepherd’s Life (James Rebanks) and loved it.  I read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Jonathan Fry which was a good follow up since my mind was still in England with James Rebanks.  Now, my book club is completing two volumes by Sir Kenneth Clark, his self portrait.  I am also working on The Road to Character by David Brooks to see if it is something my older grandchildren would like.



By Capt. Father Warren on July 26, 2015 at 10:18 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Reading Ken Follet’s trilogy of history from WWI to the election of Obama.  Extremely well done with a look at all that history through the lives of fictional characters living in the history.  The scenes move back and forth between Europe and the US so that you get the feeling of really being there.



By Terry Tee on July 25, 2015 at 7:24 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Diocese of London: Buildings on Sure Foundations: stories of opened churches

I write as you know from an RC perspective.

I was moved by the description of formerly empty, shuttered churches, semi-derelict, being brought back to life.  But I wondered what to make of the stories of churches installing coffee bars, post offices and the like.  The idea put forward here is that by drawing in the local community, links will be made, people will recognise the church in their midst as a spiritual resource, and start making use of it.  Really?  I submit that it is equally likely that the idea of sacred space could be lost, and with it, an important aspect of our faith, namely that while God can be found anywhere and any time, to set aside space to reflect away from the pressures and images of everyday life allows us to enter into a deeper communion with God.

The bottom line is always:  have attendances increased?  I know that the Diocese of London bucks the English trend in being the only diocese with growing numbers.  But it is difficult to know the balance of the various forces at work, eg HTB church planting, immigration, and so on.



By Brian Vander Wel on July 25, 2015 at 10:15 am [comment link]
From the entry: A keep things in Perspective Dept Entry--A 1966 futurists quote on online shopping

I find it interesting that the assumption is that remote shopping will only affect women: “because [they] like to get out of the house.”



By sophy0075 on July 24, 2015 at 8:51 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I have been armchair travelling this year while moving house. Escapist? Yes, but all of these are evocations of their locales and the problems and issues concerning them:
1. Two by Sara Wheeler - “Travels in Antarctica” and “The Magnetic North.” Wonderful descriptions of scientific research, how scientists deal with isolation and local challenges (don’t go out without a gun if you are in polar bear country), and word pictures of cold (if you are summering in the South, you will understand)
2. Simon Schama - The Story of the Jews - This is an amazing, partially chronological account of Jewish history/culture/religion (all are bound up together in ways modern Westerners don’t comprehend) from earliest times to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. If you ever entertain notions of proselytising to Jewish people, you must absorb this book - then you may start to understand why your conversion targets often view your efforts with a mix of fear, suspicion, hostility and disbelief.
3. Alexander McCall Smith’s series “The Ladies No. 1 Detective Agency” -  I have just finished the third book in the series and find each more delightful. His portrayals of his heroines are realistic and sympathetic, their “old Botswana morality” is the old morality I wish would return to the West (in lieu of the “whatever I think right” viewpoint of the “me” culture), the heat, dust, and brotherhood of this African nation is liberally mixed with humour and affection.
4. Edmund Crispin - “The Moving Toyshop” - Decidedly not a children’s book, but a detective story set amongst pre-World War II Oxford’s dreaming spires. Be prepared for lots of literary illusions and Latin and French quotes.
5. Tom Standage - “An Edible History of Humanity” - a thought-provoking series of hypotheses regarding how the foods humans have eaten from the Stone Age onward have made and reshaped their societies.



By Katherine on July 24, 2015 at 8:43 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A keep things in Perspective Dept Entry--A 1966 futurists quote on online shopping

I see lots of people pulling up to the lane to pick up their online grocery orders.  Very popular option.  Saltmarsh Gal, you must be (lucky you!) of a normal height.  I almost never buy clothing in real stores, and am approaching panic on what to do for myself and my younger daughter for an upcoming family wedding.



By Luke on July 24, 2015 at 1:51 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Yes, Canon Harmon, that’s the Lewis biography I meant.

Mitford series…I’ve always enjoyed them. But, they’re becoming less and less real as history happens in the Anglican Communion.



By Saltmarsh Gal on July 24, 2015 at 12:22 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A keep things in Perspective Dept Entry--A 1966 futurists quote on online shopping

Definitely true for the grocery store and local farmers’ markets, furniture, and clothing but am certainly fond of online shopping for lots of other things.



By Saltmarsh Gal on July 24, 2015 at 12:18 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Just finished The Shepherd’s Life - Modern Dispatches from an Ancient Landscape by James Rebanks..set in the Lake District.  A superb read and made me rethink the oft repeated notion of the “low-lifeness” of the shepherds of Jesus’ time. Rebank has gotten me going on Wordsworth.  The big summer project has been re-reading the seven mystical novels of Charles Williams - my fav is the first - In the Place of the Lion.  For escapist mystery detective reading - The Inspector Gamache series of Louise Penny - it takes about the first fifth of the first book for her to find her proper voice but she found it and they have been entertaining.  Starting now on Fool’s Talk by Os Guiness and eagerly awaiting the arrival of How to Raise an Adult by Julie Lythcott-Haims - the former Dean of Students of Stanford U.



By Pb on July 24, 2015 at 11:22 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I just read Crazy by Pete Earley. The author’s son’s mental illness brought Earley into the mental health/legal system. The decision to dispense mental health care on an out patient basis and the constitutional right to be mentally ill and refuse treatment are highlighted by his personal and journalistic experiences. The most recent theater shooting seems to be one of these cases.



By Karen B. on July 24, 2015 at 10:24 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

And slightly off topic…. a future book I’m eagerly awaiting.  I thought I’d mention this in case there are other Mitford lovers here who don’t yet know the great news.  Jan Karon’s got a new Mitford book due out in September!! 
Come Rain or Come Shine
due out 22 Sept.  I can’t wait!!

You can read all about it on her facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/JanKaron

Let’s just say it features a wedding…. grin

May Jan Karon live long and continue to write many more Mitford books!  I can read each book over & over again and always find new spiritual encouragement & truth.



By Karen B. on July 24, 2015 at 10:19 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Here’s another fiction recommendation, especially for dog lovers.  In June before several plane trips, I was looking for some light reading.  Through my library’s ebook lending program (what a blessing!) I borrowed: The Mountaintop School for Dogs and Other Second Chances, by Ellen Cooney

It could probably be classified young adult fiction… it’s a coming of age story about a troubled young woman who gets a job working at an unconventional dog rescue facility.  Truly a sweet and moving story. 

Also on that same trip in June, I read the newest book (# 11) in the Maisie Dobb detective series.  A Dangerous Place, by Jacqueline Winspear.  I had not really enjoyed books 9 and 10 in the series too much, the series was getting a bit “stuck,” it seemed.  But #11 was much more interesting, and had a fascinating setting in Gibraltar during the Spanish Civil War in the lead up to World War II.

And finally rounding out the fiction books I’ve read recently, again, for “plane reading” I picked up a short novel by well known pastor and author Max LucadoMiracle at the Higher Grounds Cafe.  It’s a bit syrupy and predictable.  But it was still a fun read with quite an interesting premise, and it was encouraging to be reminded of God’s love for us as a Father who delights in communicating with His children.



By Karen B. on July 24, 2015 at 10:03 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I read All the Light We Cannot See back in January.  LOVED IT.  Recommend it very highly.  Beautiful writing, powerful story, interesting history.



By CSeitz-ACI on July 24, 2015 at 8:47 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Kendall—It’s the kind of book you hate to read too quickly knowing the story must end at some point. I have German relatives who lived through Werner’s story as told here, and St Malo is a fascinating part of France to set the action for the blind protagonist.



By Kendall Harmon on July 24, 2015 at 8:22 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

#11, just in case you hadn’t seen it, I posted “Exploring the Thought of Gifted Writer Anthony Doerr” back in March

http://www.kendallharmon.net/t19/index.php/t19/print_w_comments/59467/

Note his undergraduate major!



By Kendall Harmon on July 24, 2015 at 8:20 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Just so I am staying with you #12, on the last entry do you mean Alister McGrath’s?



By Luke on July 24, 2015 at 7:58 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

G. K. Chesterton’s Life of St. Francis…not easy, but compelling.

Gave our priest/rector a copy for a birthday gift - he seemed very pleased.

Also read the the recent C. S. Lewis bio.



By montanan on July 23, 2015 at 10:06 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Being Mortal by Atule Gawande - remarkable insight; should probably be read once a decade starting at 25 years of age.  Just got The Anglican Way by Thomas McKenzie.  I think I’ll look into All the Light We Cannot See mentioned above - I had looked at that, but didn’t pick it up.  Now I’m curious.



By Kendall Harmon on July 23, 2015 at 8:00 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

CSeitz in #9, that first one is by a Bowdoin grad. which is how it made my radar screen.  I haven’t gotten to it yet so appreciate the comment.



By Kendall Harmon on July 23, 2015 at 7:54 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

We have decided to try Arnaldur Indridason’s books which we never had a chance to get to—Jar City: A Reykjavi­k Thriller, Silence of the Grave, and Voices.  It will be interesting to enter the world of Icelandic mystery.



By Terry Tee on July 23, 2015 at 7:05 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

A friend insisted that I read the memoir of Richard Coles, former pop star turned Church of England vicar.  I resisted.  I do not like celebrity clergy, and he has quite a high profile on radio and tv.  In the end my friend bought the book and gave it to me.  It turned out to be compelling reading:  Unfathomable Riches.  There were some wonderfully humorous passages that got me laughing, some thought-provoking cultural references and above all, a conversion story.  Anglicans should love it, even if not everybody agrees with everything in the book.



By Vatican Watcher on July 23, 2015 at 6:06 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Last week I read _The Disaster Artist_ by Greg Sestero.  It is about Greg’s friendship with Tommy Wiseau, an enigmatic figure attempting to break into acting, and Greg’s experiences assisting Tommy in making Tommy’s independently financed _The Room_, regarded by many as the “Citizen Kane” of bad movies.  Moved right along; I finished it in two days.  Great read if you are into learning about how movies are made (or in this case, how they shouldn’t be made).



By Richard A. Menees on July 23, 2015 at 6:04 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I have enjoyed I Will Have Vengeance: The Summer of Commisario Ricciardi by Maurizio de Giovanni.  Now reading de Giovanni’s L’Omicidio Carosino: Le Prime Indagini del Commissario Ricciardi by the same author.  These murder mysteries set in Naples during Italy’s fascist period are dark but decent and exceptionally well told.  I am delighted that my parishioner Dr. Tony Perelli-Minetti, a retired psychiatrist, acts as my lending library for these “gialli” by one of Italy’s premier “giallisti”.  You might say “pulp fiction” but I think a higher rank is in order.



By CSeitz-ACI on July 23, 2015 at 5:19 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Fiction: All the Light We Cannot See, Anthony Doerr. Sheer genius.

Non-fiction: The War that Ended Peace, Margaret McMillan. Paris 1919 was her previous offering.



By Langley Granbery on July 23, 2015 at 4:37 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

I’ve started Rebel Yell by S.C. Gwynne. It’s a biography of Stonewall Jackson. He was a complicated person and multi-faceted. I didn’t know that he was a physics professor at VMI before the civil war, and an unpopular one at that. (The course itself was called something else.) His rise to prominence is fascinating.
The author is the older brother of The Rev. Geoff Gwynne. Geoff started at Trinity but finished seminary at Yale. A few years ago at Trinity, Geoff told me his brother had written a bestseller on the Comanche Empire called Empire of the Summer Moon. I read that and really enjoyed it. S.C. Gwynne is a great writer.



By Karen B. on July 23, 2015 at 2:06 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Been working my way slowly through Tim Keller’s book “Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God” 

Lots of challenging stuff to think through / apply and so I’ve needed time to digest it so that it doesn’t just stay at the level of interesting head knowledge. 

I love how he incorporates and reflects on the writings of Augustine, Luther & Calvin on prayer.  It’s really meaty in that sense.  Keller is not trying to reinvent the wheel, rather perhaps to synthesize and harmonize some of the excellent writings on prayer from notable saints of the past.  One of the best books on prayer I’ve ever read.  Highly recommended.

I’ve got other books I’d love to share about, but am exhausted from a very stressful day right now, so will wait until tomorrow or Sat. to write more… 

I do hope folks will include some fiction recommendations here.  I’ll have a few weeks “stay-cation” in August and am looking forward to the opportunity to relax and read a few novels in the coming weeks.  Always open to good new authors!



By Richard A. Menees on July 23, 2015 at 12:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: NR Zimbabwe: Pastor goes berserk, destroys Anglican church property

Thank you for this post.  We served for six years in Zimbabwe in the Diocese of Harare.  The sad episode of the bishop who was removed for cause still leaves this kind of negative fallout.  But it is helpful to hear even the bad news as it directs our prayers.  We believe that the Church in Zimbabwe is seeing a new day of Godly leadership.  We pray for its people, clergy and bishops for continued faithfulness and growth.

Richard and Martha Menees



By Knapsack on July 23, 2015 at 10:39 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Just finished “Go Set A Watchman,” and while I think the second half shows that it’s still in need of an editorial workover, I can see it as an interesting . . . well, both a predecessor and successor to the author’s one notable work, “To Kill a Mockingbird.” And while the part in need of some editing is not quite what it could be, it can provide (maybe even more effectively given that it’s not *quite* a finished work) a basis for some very interesting conversations. I commend it without any substantial reservations.



By APB on July 23, 2015 at 7:18 am [comment link]
From the entry: Blog Open Thread--What Book(s) are you Reading this Summer?

Currently reading “Winston S. Churchill- The Prophet of Truth, 1922-1939.”  Understanding history allows you to place current events in context.  Something today’s generation who believe the world began the day they were born do poorly.  This particular volume of the official Churchill biography obviously covers the events which brought about the Second World War.  The similarities to today are troubling, and in some cases the differences are more so.


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