RECENT COMMENTS

By Jill Woodliff on January 29, 2015 at 10:14 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Archbishop Justin Welby--On tweeting and touching

The personal interactions include facilitated (manipulated) conversations and slates of candidates of which none represent the conservative voice.  Another phenomenon is for a staged meeting for input on a bishop candidate to be held, but none of the requests made are honored.  In the interpersonal realm, the conservatives feel as if their voices are marginalized.  I do believe that is why they have gravitated to the Internet.
It has been my observation that only rarely will a progressive engage in a debate with a conservative on the Internet, at least in the Anglican blogosphere.  I don’t think the progressives want to hear another point of view.  They are very certain that they are right.  They control the levers of power.  Why risk discussing another point of view?
Much has been posted in the Anglican blogosphere in addition to discussion of church politics—Bible studies, resources, prayers, musical selections, theological reflections, poetry.



By Katherine on January 29, 2015 at 7:50 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Mona Eltahawy--Egypt’s War on Atheism

I can see Ms. Eltahawy’s point of view.  I had an officially Muslim but really atheist friend in Cairo.  There were people who hoped that when Mubarak went, they might get a western-style liberal democracy (although we in the U.S. are in danger of throwing ours away for a different, liberal-enforced orthodoxy).  My atheist friend thought that Egypt was not ready for a western-style democracy, and I am reluctantly coming to agree with him.

What Mr. al Sisi is trying to do is reform and tame Islam so it is no longer so dangerous and violent.  Atheists and gays are targeted to prove he is not irreligious.  This is not a tactic we approve of, but then, Egypt is not the U.S.  My husband and I gained considerable respect among his Muslim employees in Cairo because we attended Christian services, unlike various other expatriates who were functionally atheist.



By MichaelA on January 29, 2015 at 6:03 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Ian Paul: 300 and still standing...

Very interesting when juxtaposed with the ABC’s latest attempt to limit internet discussion of church affairs.



By MichaelA on January 29, 2015 at 6:00 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Vat Radio) Catholic archbishop responds to first woman bishop in Church of England

Yep.



By MichaelA on January 29, 2015 at 5:59 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Archbishop Justin Welby--On tweeting and touching

“The trouble is that subtleties, tone and access all get muddled up.”

Ah, but so do they also in direct communication, dear ABC.  I have seen many cases where particular habits of interaction lead to people quarrelling bitterly face-to-face, whereas when they write to each other (letters or email) they manage to avoid the quarrels and stick to the real issues. 

Internet communication is no better or worse than any other, and there are even times when it is more effective than direct conversation.

“But the best examples of disagreement and strain are dealt with personally. The Gospel of Matthew, chapter 18, sets out the pattern.”

Actually the New Testament also contains plenty of examples of dealing effectively with disagreement via written communication.  Take Paul’s letter to Philemon for example.

“Tone is equally difficult to achieve; electronic media has no volume control.”

And tone can sometimes have a negative effect on communication.  It is rather concerning that the ABC doesn’t appear to understand this.

“Love often says don’t write.”

Too bad nobody told this to the apostles Paul and John, nor the leaders of the Church at Jerusalem.  And the self-interest of the Archbishop of Canterbury wanting to limit internet discussion of his own actions is rather obvious.



By MichaelA on January 29, 2015 at 5:49 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Brown-- Justin Welby’s Twitter sermon sounds like a plea for ecclesiastical discipline

The By Line reads: “At a time of unrest for the church, it’s no wonder the Archbishop of Canterbury doesn’t want the church’s dirty linen aired online”.  Of course not, particularly because a lot of it is the ABC’s dirty linen.  In other words, he personally has been copping a lot of the criticism, and therefore its natural that he would want to limit the use of that medium.

“On the other hand, there is no doubt that the schism in the Anglican Communion would have happened much more slowly and perhaps not at all without the help of the internet. Quite possibly the Reformation would never have caught on without the printing press, either.”

Andrew Brown is not the first one to draw that analogy, and it is a very good one.  I am sure that Frank Griswold, Katie Schori, Rowan Williams and many others have cursed the internet many times, just as establishment church leaders cursed the printing press in the early 16th century.  But it is here, and it allows everyone to work out what is going on very quickly.

The other aspect is that the internet empowers everyone - not just clergy, and not just the small group of lay people that always hold influential positions in every church.  As PM rightly observes at #1, it means that even those beyond the church “elites” have the chance to know what is going on, and to comment on it.  The elites find that unsettling.



By Adam 12 on January 29, 2015 at 5:08 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A. S. Haley--Mere Anglicanism 2015 - a Report (I)

Thank you Mr. haley for blogging your experiences. We have missed your presence on Curmudgeon lately.



By driver8 on January 29, 2015 at 4:51 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Brown-- Justin Welby’s Twitter sermon sounds like a plea for ecclesiastical discipline

Dear Lord. We are such a risk averse culture, so fearful. Cultures in which robust polemic is practiced - such as significant parts of Scripture and pretty much all the Church Fathers - use polemic, in part, to demonstrate a certain sort of competence and to demand others demonstrate it too.

This sort of public demonstration of skill, could be and was entirely compatible with cultures that were vastly less individualistic and isolated than contemporary western societies.

In other words it’s not only possible, but in fact was often true of our predecessors, that they combined a robust and energetic delight in polemic with a dense and intimate communal life.

Ironically we have neither.



By priestwalter on January 29, 2015 at 4:45 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Baltimore Area Episcopal Diocese asks bishop for resignation following fatal bike crash

I agree with David.  Tom, you mentioned ‘I read that she is at a well-regarded alcoholism treatment facility’.  Unfortunately, these facilities do not have a ‘magic-wand’ and the success rates in the very best alcohol rehabs are dismal.  This is not her first rodeo.  Although relapse is often a part of recovery, I have not read that she ever began a program of recovery after her last drug/alcohol conviction. Oh, and let’s not forget she is also a druggy.  This not just about alcohol.  Bible believing denominations would never have considered her a candidate for the episcopate in the first place.  But this is TEC.



By New Reformation Advocate on January 29, 2015 at 4:17 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Baltimore Area Episcopal Diocese asks bishop for resignation following fatal bike crash

Very compassionate and pastoral of you, Tom.  But I strongly disagree.  My own reaction was a perhaps snarky, “Finally.  What took so long?”

The diocese was terribly slow in acknowledging reality and the incredible scandal that this whole bizarre set of wierd and ugly events has caused.  That scandal is many-sided.  It’s not just the multiple crimes committed by +Cook in this tragic accident: her DUI, stupidly texting while driving, and the hit-and-run killing of the hapless cyclist.  The wider set of related scandals involve for starters the total failure of the diocesan leadership to face up to Cook’s alcoholism, confront her about it, and help support her in the hard work of recovery.  But the scandals also involve the highly suspicious “companion” relationship between +Cook and Mark Hansen.  According to 1 Tim. 3 and Titus 1, a bishop is supposed to be completely above reproach, without even the appearance of impropriety or anything nearly so outrageous as has come to light since this convoluted mess began.

So while we are called to be merciful as a primary trait of God’s people (e.g., “Do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God,” from Micah, or “Blessed are the merciful…” from the Beatitudes in Matthew), the needs of Heather Cook as a hurting, wounded individual are secondary to the needs of the Christian Community, for our integrity and public reputation have beed badly damaged, and many folks disheartened by how the whole affair has been mishandled.

As with any big scandal, “It’s not the crime, it’s the cover-up” that does the most damage to the Church’s credibility.  This whole sad episode is Exhibit 789 that TEC seems to be simply incapable of imposing necessary discipline on anyone, for any reason, except, of course, for political incorrectness. 

David Handy+



By TomRightmyer on January 29, 2015 at 2:54 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Baltimore Area Episcopal Diocese asks bishop for resignation following fatal bike crash

While I think I can understand some of the social pressure felt by the Standing Committee, Bishop, and leaders in the Diocese of Maryland, as a priest ordained in that diocese in 1966 who served there until 1974 I think the call for Bishop Cook’s resignation is not wise.  I read that she is at a well-regarded alcoholism treatment facility in Harford County, not far from where I served at Joppatowne, and I hope the diocesan medical insurance is helping pay for that.  I would like to have read more public support for her from the bishop and others in the diocese, something like, “Bishop Cook appears to have made some very serious errors in judgment. We don’t condone those, and she will have to deal with the consequences, but she is one of us, a member of the clergy of this diocese, and we support her as she continues her life in Christ.”



By WestJ on January 29, 2015 at 1:22 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Brown-- Justin Welby’s Twitter sermon sounds like a plea for ecclesiastical discipline

Matthew 10:27 says ” What I tell you in darkness, speak in the daylight: and what you hear in the ear, proclaim upon the housetops”.
I take that to mean that there shall be no secrets in the Gospel of Christ.
The internet has allowed information to flow down to the everyday parishioners. While it is true there are some shrill voices on both sides, I believe that the availability of knowledge is a good thing. Who knows, if the outrages of Pike and Spong had been more widely known at the time they were new and the church more conservative, then true discipline might have occurred and we might not be in this mess. Of course, that would suppose that the House of Bishops would have shown some spine…



By Catholic Mom on January 29, 2015 at 11:06 am [comment link]
From the entry: (Vat Radio) Catholic archbishop responds to first woman bishop in Church of England

while the ordination of women presents challenges to the Anglican-Catholic dialogue, this latest development “shouldn’t affect the way in which the dialogue is continued”.

Since the dialogue is pretty much sitting around shooting the breeze, it’s hard to see what *would* affect the way in which the dialogue is continued, except maybe a severe sherry shortage.



By Jeremy Bonner on January 29, 2015 at 10:49 am [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Brown-- Justin Welby’s Twitter sermon sounds like a plea for ecclesiastical discipline

For that matter, the exchanges in the religious periodical press of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries were frequently marked by a vigour that might by some be considered uncharitable.

I’m reminded of the following exchange between Eleanor Bold and Francis Arabin in Barchester Towers:

“I never saw anything like you clergymen,” said Eleanor; “You are always thinking of fighting each other.”

“Either that,” said he, “or else supporting each other. The pity is that we cannot do the one without the other. But are we not here to fight? Is not ours a church militant? What is all our work but fighting, and hard fighting, if it be well done?”

“But not with each other.”

“That’s as it may be. The same complaint which you make of me for battling with another clergyman of our own church the Mohammedan would make against me for battling with the error of a priest of Rome. Yet, surely, you would not be inclined to say that I should be wrong to do battle with such as him. A pagan, too, with his multiplicity of gods, would think it equally odd that the Christian and the Mohammedan should disagree.

“Ah! But you wage your wars about trifles so bitterly.”

“Wars about trifles,” said he, “are always bitter, especially among neighbours. When the differences are great, and the parties comparative strangers, men quarrel with courtesy. What combatants are ever so eager as two brothers?”

“But do not such contentions bring scandal on the church?”

“More scandal would fall on the church if there were no such contentions. We have but one way to avoid them — by that of acknowledging a common head of our church, whose word on all points of doctrine shall be authoritative. Such a termination of our difficulties is alluring enough. It has charms which are irresistible to many, and all but irresistible, I own, to me.”

“You speak now of the Church of Rome?” said Eleanor.

“No,” said he, “not necessarily of the Church of Rome; but of a church with a head. Had it pleased God to vouchsafe to us such a church our path would have been easy. But easy paths have not been thought good for us.” He paused and stood silent for awhile, thinking of the time when he had so nearly sacrificed all he had, his powers of mind, his free agency, the fresh running waters of his mind’s fountain, his very inner self, for an easy path in which no fighting would be needed; and then he continued:

“What you say is partly true: our contentions do bring on us some scandal. The outer world, though it constantly reviles us for our human infirmities and throws in our teeth the fact that being clergymen we are still no more than men, demands of us that we should do our work with godlike perfection. There is nothing god-like about us: we differ from each other with the acerbity common to man; we triumph over each other with human frailty; we allow differences on subjects of divine origin to produce among us antipathies and enmities which are anything but divine. This is all true. But what would you have in place of it? There is no infallible head for a church on earth. This dream of believing man has been tried, and we see in Italy and in Spain what has come of it. Grant that there are and have been no bickerings within the pale of the Pope’s Church. Such an assumption would be utterly untrue, but let us grant it, and then let us say which church has incurred the heavier scandals.”



By Sarah1 on January 29, 2015 at 10:46 am [comment link]
From the entry: Archbishop Justin Welby--On tweeting and touching

His comments beg the question of whether the personal interaction has taken place—and of course they have.

The social media *response* to the realities of those personal interactions are the things that Welby doesn’t like—and I can certainly see why. Actions have consequences—and the gross heresy of TEC and Canada, along with the lack of ecclesial discipline for that gross heresy, means consequences for us all, including the communication of the responses via social media.

Good.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 29, 2015 at 10:27 am [comment link]
From the entry: In a Homily today, Pope Francis says No to ecclesial elites who privatize the faith

This seems slightly confused to me, although it may be in translation.

On the one hand there is the question of whether salvation by Jesus Christ is individual or corporate.  There are those who say there is no individual salvation indeed it is a heresy. The Presiding Bishop is on record stating such a view. Then there are those who say salvation is corporate and through the church gathered and membership of that particular church, a traditional Catholic view one heard up until quite recently.

Then again there are those who say no, salvation is an individual act of grace by God upon repentence and belief [John 1:12], such as that shown to the thief on the cross, and there is no need for the mediation of church or anyone other than Jesus.

Then there is the question of what that life produces, its fruit, and the admonition to do many of the things Pope Francis commends including preaching the Word and performing acts of charity to others.

Both these things are necessary, but it is confusing to meld the concepts of charity and salvation as an argument against individual salvation, though I can see from a Catholic Church point of view why he might say that.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 29, 2015 at 10:05 am [comment link]
From the entry: Andrew Brown-- Justin Welby’s Twitter sermon sounds like a plea for ecclesiastical discipline

there is no doubt that the schism in the Anglican Communion would have happened much more slowly and perhaps not at all without the help of the internet.

Probably, if you consider the slow, though no less relentless pace at which the Colenso Affair unfolded.  Consider what impact the introduction of more time might have had, for example if PB’s Griswold and Shori had had a sea voyage back from their respective Primates Meetings to reflect, instead of stepping off a plane and doing a complete about face from what they had promised their fellow Primates hours beforehand, would that enforced time for reflection upon consequences have led to less conflict?  We will never know.

What we do know is that the genie is out of the bottle.  Thanks to the internet, twitter, and youtube, a massacre in Syria, an execution in Iran or the destruction of a church in Egypt will within a few minutes be all over the world.  Elites do not like that; they are no longer able to spin events or deny them when the evidence is stored on their listeners’ phones.  The ability of the ordinary man or woman to question their leaders’ actions has never been greater, even as the technological ability to oppress the population has never been greater.

In Anglican Communion terms, if someone preaches from the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, tells an audience that the only god is that within you, or gives an interview that undermines other members of the church, or is pictured in unsuitable company then indeed it is highly likely that that will impact the Anglican Communion as word spreads pretty much instantly.  It is not necessary to engage in private admonition or correspondence about what is a matter of public policy.

I think where there is a line to be drawn is between an individual’s actions in their public work, such as a Presiding Bishop who proceeds to consecrate having just promised not to do so, and their private and family life, except so far as they themselves have put that into the public domain, and where the disparity between their private actions and public pronouncements are so marked.

But whatever I think, the scrutiny of the social media is just a fact of life now, and while ecclesiastical elites may dislike the public accountability they are now subject to it in real time; that is just the way things are and will probably remain.  I believe that accountability is a good thing, not for abuse of individuals, but for the good of the church that policy actions are subject to such scrutiny.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 29, 2015 at 9:39 am [comment link]
From the entry: Archbishop Justin Welby--On tweeting and touching

with an arm around the shoulder and tears in your eyes that can be seen by the person being rebuked


Yuk.  The last thing I would want is someone like Archbishop Welby pawing and drooling all over me like a wet spaniel.



By MichaelA on January 28, 2015 at 6:04 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The GAFCON Chairman's January 2015 Pastoral Letter

“This is especially necessary given the challenge of what Pope Francis last week described as ‘ideological colonisation’, which is the practice of tying aid and development resources to the promotion of alien understandings of gender, the family and sexual behaviour.  Money is a very powerful tool and manipulation can happen with varying degrees of subtlety.”

Its great to see the Archbishop naming the tactic for what it is.  This is precisely what they do.  He is giving CAPA a wake-up call as much as anything else.

But it is in his identification of the solution that I think the real brilliance is to be found:

“Such practices must be challenged, but the best defence is for ordinary Christians to have renewed minds that are profoundly shaped by the Bible. When each local church is able to see itself as a colony of heaven, its members will be much more resistant to being colonised by non-Christian ideologies.”

One of the key manifestations of this is planting and nurturing faithful congregations.  Its not enough simply to take a stand on biblical truth in our own particular church, diocese, parish or organisation (although that is very important).  But we must also counter-attack by nurturing new faithful Christians, and that comes from the congregation.  It is important to protect congregations against infiltration, and that in turn means securing the seminaries, since faithful clergy will secure faithful congregations.  But as a bottom line we need to plant and water many more faithful congregations, and trust them to do the work of raising up enthusiastic defenders of the faith.



By MichaelA on January 28, 2015 at 5:57 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (GR) Episcopal land wars in Maryland: is this story truly doctrine-free or not?

Sarah that makes sense (and its very sad that its happening).



By MichaelA on January 28, 2015 at 5:53 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg Busweek) The Car Windshield Is Turning Into a Computer Screen

“As weird as it sounds, projecting text and graphics onto the windshield may be less distracting to drivers than forcing them to look down at cluttered in-car screens”

Not only that, but it leaves your hands free to take extreme evasive action when an SA-16 locks on to your exhaust signature… smile



By MichaelA on January 28, 2015 at 5:50 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A lot more Photographs from Mere Anglicanism 2015 available

Os Guiness still looks like John Cleese!



By Adam 12 on January 28, 2015 at 5:16 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg Busweek) The Car Windshield Is Turning Into a Computer Screen

TV screens and projectors break—-sometimes at inconvenient times—-and then what kind of controls are we left with?



By CSeitz-ACI on January 28, 2015 at 3:32 pm [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

#30 My note was perhaps unclear. I do think there will be attrition, and that Porter gets that. But I believe he thinks he has the figures right, and that is where I believe he is misguided.
#29 You may be right about Porter referring to maintaining communion. But I believe he is terribly misguided. After all, the communion is already quite prepared to go their own way. At some point, the CofE will just be a matter of indifference.

As one can see on blogs, many liberals in the CofE don’t want there to be a communion, so it doesn’t matter to them. Has Porter got that far? I doubt it. I think he believes he can pull this psycho-dynamic thing off.



By Bookworm(God keep Snarkster) on January 28, 2015 at 2:52 pm [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

Dr. Seitz says:  “First, it misrepresents the CofE reality. Second, it is terribly wrong when it comes to the wider AC. He apparently does not grasp this. The vast majority of the GS is not going to adopt a progressive sexuality they find no scriptural warrant for. But somehow he has persuaded himself this is about temperament and interpersonal dynamics, and in addition he has the outcome dreadfully wrong.”

I think he “grasps it”, he just doesn’t care.  They’re just using flowery word soup to put lipstick on the pig it really is. They, IMHO, truly want the traditionals to either walk or acquiesce(Sarah’s point). Perhaps they do underestimate what a mess it will really be—but, as usual, all that matters is “the agenda”, and “they” or whoever will just deal with the fallout as it comes.

I agree with Pageantmaster above that the Anglican way IS looking to the words of Jesus and the teachings of the Scriptures as we approach ecclesial decision-making, but sadly that “Ship” sailed for these people a long time ago. It has long since been replaced with a manipulative free-for-all in the misnomer of “compassion” and “this is how I’m made” and “this is how I feel”. And for them it is utterly beside the point that, e.g., as a woman, I am technically “made” for 5+ husbands if I so choose, but that is not the teaching of Scripture, so thus that is not what I do nor behavior I expect blessed in the Church.

And while I am a traditional American, I am an American, born and bred all the same, and I find American behaviors, as demonstrated by TEC for YEARS, abhorrent, just for the record. Pageantmaster and Africans, etc. I am sorry re: those who have done this. As an American, it’s certainly not anything I ever wanted or believed right—especially considering the twisted, deceptive M.O. to get it where it is, and probably where it will continue to go.



By Sarah1 on January 28, 2015 at 1:24 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christ Church Anglican in Savannah, Georgia, to move into new home Feb. 1

I have immense respect for Christ Church Anglican—may they continue to flourish in their new building!



By Sarah1 on January 28, 2015 at 1:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (GR) Episcopal land wars in Maryland: is this story truly doctrine-free or not?

RE: “Small old parishes that aren’t viable in themselves will be “encouraged” to fold into others so as to release funds to plant the new churches.”

In my diocese there are “small old parishes” which have become “even smaller” because so many conservatives have left the parish and new people who are Episcopalian or even simply sacramentally and liturgically inclined Christians moving to the diocese understandably do not consider the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina an appropriate place for practicing the Christian faith.

So the question is . . . why are formerly “small” parishes becoming “smaller” and thus on the selling block?  Could the reason potentially be a doctrinal one?  In my diocese, again, “small” parishes in small town have been utterly decimated by liberal rectors arriving and driving parishioners away and thus hastening the parish’s end. 

That reality being played out in diocese after diocese kind of means there would be more bitterness than usual over a parish closing since it certainly might not have happened but for the ghastly leadership of a diocese and of parishes!

I suspect that may be what the journalist is questioning.



By Sarah1 on January 28, 2015 at 1:14 pm [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

RE: “The vast majority of the GS is not going to adopt a progressive sexuality they find no scriptural warrant for.”

I agree—but I think what Porter envisions is that 80% of the Provinces of the Anglican Communion will be okay with maintaining communion with a COE that does adopt a progressive sexuality.



By CSeitz-ACI on January 28, 2015 at 10:16 am [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

#26 I referred to Porter on purpose. I am not confident about the ABC but I don’t think he misreads the AC egregiously. He is also a ‘manager’ more than an ‘idea’ person. At issue for him will not be grandiose 80% ideas, but what he wants to manage.



By Fr. Dale on January 28, 2015 at 10:13 am [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

#26. It appears that the ABC bought into this myopic kind of thinking. There is no such animal as good disagreement. Isn’t this the same thing as “living into the tension” of days gone by?



By CSeitz-ACI on January 28, 2015 at 10:04 am [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

Is part of the problem that someone like Porter cannot see that his 80% idea is predicated on an (exaggerated) local reality, in which 10% are extreme at either end of a spectrum. First, it misrepresents the CofE reality. Second, it is terribly wrong when it comes to the wider AC. He apparently does not grasp this. The vast majority of the GS is not going to adopt a progressive sexuality they find no scriptural warrant for. But somehow he has persuaded himself this is about temperament and interpersonal dynamics, and in addition he has the outcome dreadfully wrong. The AC is not 80% OK with Porter’s vision. It is likely not 25% OK with it.



By tjmcmahon on January 28, 2015 at 8:51 am [comment link]
From the entry: David Porter Lays Out Justin Welby's Sexual Immorality Plans for the CofE

As much as I loathed those innocuous statements that used to come out of Lambeth after every similar glimpse of what was really going on, I now find it somewhat disheartening that they aren’t even bothering to deny, or claim misquote, or “clarify.”  It has been a week since this open statement on what their plans are, and as far as I can tell, neither Welby nor Porter has issued any statement referencing the meeting with Coward and Co.  Or for that matter, addressing the related issue of the meeting in New York where TEC bought signatures (assuming that any of the Primates actually signed the communique that was clearly written by TEC).

Truly disheartening in a church that self identifies as the Body of Christ on Earth.

I am convinced that the true leadership of the real Anglican Communion (ie: that portion whose aim is to be in Communion with our Lord) can be found among the consecrators of Foley Beach, the Gafcon Primates, and others in the GS.  The bureaucrats in London cannot even manage to get out a press release anymore, and are committed to compromising away whatever vestiges still exist of the Anglican Churches in the western world.



By MichaelA on January 28, 2015 at 4:05 am [comment link]
From the entry: (GR) Episcopal land wars in Maryland: is this story truly doctrine-free or not?

I found this a very frustrating article - I could not understand what the journo was trying to say.  He asked a lot of question that I could have asked myself, but no answers, even at a fairly basic level.  Perhaps its because I am a foreigner and miss the nuance that others get.

In essence he says that there is a small church that the diocese is trying to close down and sell, and its small congregation is unhappy about it.  Sure, but why is that bad, or good?  Terry gives no context for making a judgment.

Whilst I am no defender of the Episcopal Church, the fact is that healthy dioceses sometimes do need to make decisions like this.  My diocese (Sydney) is in very healthy shape by western church standards, but sometimes it closes churches, sells the building and folds the parish into another.  It happened to my church (actually we were the foldees rather than the folded , so we got to stay in our building).  That caused a lot of hurt and pain, but taking the long view it was the right decision:  We are in an old established area of Sydney and the Archdiocese is doing its best to finance church plants in the new housing estates.  Small old parishes that aren’t viable in themselves will be “encouraged” to fold into others so as to release funds to plant the new churches.  And with 600,000 people expected to move into new areas of Sydney over the next 5 years, the need is huge.

So, why is Dio Maryland’s decision in this case anything but responsible stewardship of sparse resources?



By LfxN on January 28, 2015 at 4:00 am [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg Busweek) The Car Windshield Is Turning Into a Computer Screen

I can hardly wait until I can spend the final moments of my life playing angry birds on my windshield while driving.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 27, 2015 at 11:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lent and Beyond: Prayer for South Carolina on Tuesday January 27th

It would be good to pray and fast for South Carolina during the day.



By Pageantmaster ن on January 27, 2015 at 10:37 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lent and Beyond: Prayer for South Carolina on Tuesday January 27th

When your people go to war against their enemies, wherever you send them, and when they pray to you toward this city you have chosen and the temple I have built for your Name, then hear from heaven their prayer and their plea, and uphold their cause.

When they sin against you—for there is no one who does not sin—and you become angry with them and give them over to the enemy, who takes them captive to a land far away or near; and if they have a change of heart in the land where they are held captive, and repent and plead with you in the land of their captivity and say, ‘We have sinned, we have done wrong and acted wickedly’; and if they turn back to you with all their heart and soul in the land of their captivity where they were taken, and pray toward the land you gave their ancestors, toward the city you have chosen and toward the temple I have built for your Name; then from heaven, your dwelling place, hear their prayer and their pleas, and uphold their cause. And forgive your people, who have sinned against you.

Now, my God, may your eyes be open and your ears attentive to the prayers offered in this place.

Now arise, Lord God, and come to your resting place,
you and the ark of your might.
May your priests, Lord God, be clothed with salvation,
may your faithful people rejoice in your goodness.
Solomon’s Prayer of Dedication - 2 Chronicles 6:34-41

Lord God, bless the wonderful Diocese of South Carolina who repent and welcome you; have mercy upon them, save them from their enemies and build your temple again in their midst so that your glory may shine out to the nations in this place as a beacon on a hill, in Jesus’ name we pray. Amen.



By Emerson Champion on January 27, 2015 at 9:04 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Bloomberg Busweek) The Car Windshield Is Turning Into a Computer Screen

I just purchased a Mazda 3i Sport sedan, primarily for the excellent fuel mileage rating. While this is not the top-of-the-line model, it has a 7” touchscreen through which the radio is controlled, as well as my phone via Bluetooth technology. I can play music from my phone, a USB memory stick, and the radio. Higher models & trim levels have all this plus a CD player, navigation, and a back up camera, all controlled through this touch screen, which is also controlled through a knob on the center console.

I am finding this touch screen to be a major distraction. It does have a “blank screen” setting, and that is where I tend to put it so my eyes are not constantly drawn to it. I can see how this could be a larger problem than sending texts on a smartphone.



By TomRightmyer on January 27, 2015 at 8:51 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (GR) Episcopal land wars in Maryland: is this story truly doctrine-free or not?

When I was ordained in the Diocese of Maryland in 1966 the diocese assigned us for two years to be assistants. I went to Annapolis and in 1968 was given a choice of Middle River or a new plant in Joppatowne, MD.  Middle River was marginal almost 50 years ago, prosperous and growing during the war when the Martin plant was busy, but on the decline since.  Faithful people, generous, loving, but too few of them for a viable parish.  Holy Trinity Essex, nearby, benefitted from a state requirement that churches taken for road projects received replacement value. It moved and built and now seems to be going strong, perhaps because the people of Middle River have joined it.  Joppatowne, where I went, did not grow big enough and has been served by part-time clergy in recent years.  Even the large old churches like Old St. Paul’s downtown have fallen on hard times.  I’m sorry Middle River was closed but I think many small town and even county seat churches will close in the next generation.



By tgd on January 27, 2015 at 6:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lent and Beyond: Prayer for South Carolina on Tuesday January 27th

It seems that back on December 10 each side was to submit a “proposed decision and order.”  I don’t think we’ve ever seen those.  Are they available/accessible?



By Mitchell on January 27, 2015 at 6:19 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christ Church Anglican in Savannah, Georgia, to move into new home Feb. 1

I am always excited to see congregations flourish from division.  From the chart it seems the split was good for both congregations.  The Episcopal congregation’s membership is back up to over half of what it was at the time of the split, and attendance is 2/3rds of what it was prior to the split.  That means a higher level of participation by members.  Also contributions are back up to 3/4ths of what they were prior to the split. 
It appears the departing Congregation will be taking on the membership of the Christian Revival Center, which previously occupied the church building they have acquired.  The move to a historic black church in a minority neighborhood was gutsy, and will hopefully provide new opportunities for outreach. 
I was married in Christ Church 28 years ago and my son was christened their three years later.  We moved from Savannah 20 years ago, but we try to attend services there whenever we return to visit old friends.  I was distressed by the split, but I am happy to see both sides move on. 
This may be a real story of the parts being greater than the whole.



By MichaelA on January 27, 2015 at 6:08 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (C of E) Libby Lane consecrated as Bishop at York Minster

Jeremy I should add,  I know from previous discussions that you don’t follow the current vogue in CofE and I wasn’t meaning to suggest that you do.  My question in para 2 of #6 was rhetorical, and I am sorry if it came out the wrong way.



By MichaelA on January 27, 2015 at 6:05 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Stable Elections in Nigeria Threatened by Boko Haram’s Latest Attacks

Whatever the reason for the malaise, they will have to deal with it, and quickly.  Someone with proven expertise in this area once wrote:

“A study and comprehension of the political objectives of this war and of the anti-[Japanese] front is particularly important for officers of guerrilla troops. There are some militarists who say: ‘We are not interested in politics but only in the profession of arms.’ It is vital that these simple-minded militarists be made to realize the relationship that exists between politics and military affairs. Military action is a method used to attain a political goal. While military affairs and political affairs are not identical, it is impossible to isolate one from the other.” [Mao Tse-Tung, “On Guerilla Warfare” Chap 6]



By MichaelA on January 27, 2015 at 6:02 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lent and Beyond: Prayer for South Carolina on Tuesday January 27th

Yes, you are in our prayers.  And I know that the Lord will lead you on to yet greater things, regardless of the court’s ruling.



By MichaelA on January 27, 2015 at 6:01 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Former St. Andrew's Anglican Church in Lawrencetown for sale

If its “a registered municipal heritage property built in the 1840s” why are they discussing pulling it down?  (please excuse my ignorance of Canadian planning terminology)



By MichaelA on January 27, 2015 at 5:54 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christ Church Anglican in Savannah, Georgia, to move into new home Feb. 1

Thanks Cranmerian.  I assume CC Episcopal would be happy with that - it certainly looks better than some TEC churches that you hear about.

But presumably CC Anglican is no longer concerned with what CC Episcopal may do, and is rejoicing in its own growth and witness.



By Katherine on January 27, 2015 at 5:24 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Lent and Beyond: Prayer for South Carolina on Tuesday January 27th

I have checked this website daily since early December, hoping to see a favorable ruling for the Diocese of South Carolina.  I still hope to see it, since there is no way to know what circumstances the Judge may be dealing with, whether personally or in her office.  I am praying for her, and for all of you in the Diocese.  May God be with you as you wait, as He will surely be with you no matter the outcome.



By Cranmerian on January 27, 2015 at 1:03 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christ Church Anglican in Savannah, Georgia, to move into new home Feb. 1

Christ Church ASA



By WestJ on January 27, 2015 at 12:03 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Christ Church Anglican in Savannah, Georgia, to move into new home Feb. 1

What has happened to those who stayed in the Episcopal Church. Historic buildings are expensive. What is the ASA at Christ Church Savannah?



By Pageantmaster ن on January 27, 2015 at 10:57 am [comment link]
From the entry: Stable Elections in Nigeria Threatened by Boko Haram’s Latest Attacks

Nigeria has one of the most powerful and best trained and equipped military forces in Africa, used in peacekeeping in other parts of Africa.  Yet the will seems to have been completely lacking within its own borders.  Neighbors are doing what they can to police their own borders, but the situation in Nigeria is endangering them all.

How can a nation which displayed such organisation and resolve when dealing with an Ebola outbreak be the same country unable to face up to the bigger threat to the lives of its people?



By Pageantmaster ن on January 27, 2015 at 10:52 am [comment link]
From the entry: Stable Elections in Nigeria Threatened by Boko Haram’s Latest Attacks

Prayers for Nigeria and its neighbors.  Things just seem to be getting worse with more abductions, murders and persecution.  I hope that whoever is elected has the resolve to tackle the issue.


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