RECENT COMMENTS

By David Keller on December 9, 2016 at 9:56 am [comment link]
From the entry: South Carolina Clergyman Pete Cooper (December 6, 1944 - December 7, 2016) RIP

Pete was an unusual, but really great guy.  I was senior warden at St. John’s in Columbia when he was ordained and I was honored to be one of his presenters. My two best memories of him were when we had a camouflage chasuble made for him, and the time he and I offered to get rid of the pigeon problem overnight at St. John’s if the vestry would buy us a case of beer and a box of pellets for Pete’s pellet gun.  They, sadly, turned us down.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 9, 2016 at 9:48 am [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

[2] Katherine - thinking about your point on perhaps a new openness in the US administration in waiting, the US has some of the toughest trade negotiators in the world.  Contra the view of the President-elect, the US has used the World Trade Organisation to prise open the markets of other countries to more efficiently and more cheaply produced US produce than those countries can support themselves.  This has opened the way to bananas, grain and GM crops being introduced at the expense of for example West Indian banana exporters and local grain farmers.

That said, for the UK, the Commission is organising a collective approach to freeze out the UK, unless we agree and pay virtually what we do as members.  It is not a matter of trade negotiation for the Commission, but of political survival.  The commission has appointed a former French foreign minister as its lead negotiator, so you can see where this is going.

There is little prospect without us being a lot tougher and cracking the whip in terms of our European defence commitment to the East European and Baltic countries in the EU, who have been going along with Brussels.  Britain spends the same per capita on its military as the US does and it is Britain’s military along with the US which keeps these countries safe.  We will also have to threaten hikes in import duties on German cars and French wine and produce if our financial services area is not to be frozen out.

Still things are moving fast in Euroland, and as I mentioned above in some senses we would be advised to let things develop and see what happens politically in France, Holland and Germany, not to mention Italy, as reality bites.

The UK certainly needs as many friends as it can and the change of tone from the President-elect from that of the President is a welcome and encouraging one, and for that we should be grateful and seize the opportunity for a fresh start in our already considerable trans Atlantic relationship.  Mrs May might be better advised to concentrate on this rather than schmoozing the Gulf Arabs, and I would not suggest that she sends Boris Johnson to the US.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 9, 2016 at 9:31 am [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

It is certainly true [4] Canon Harmon that this was not simply an anti-EU vote, and part of the reason was a coalition of those like Monti and Berlusconi joining those who were just against Renzi and the potential for a dominant party state emerging. [Italy perhaps has its reasons for caution about opening the way for this again, even at the expense of continuation of its characteristic political chaos].

However, dismay at the way that the EU has failed to share the burden of the migrant crisis on its shores and the problems with the Euro which CEBR predicts will restrict economic growth while Italy remains in the Euro remains a driving force; CEBR also predicts that there is a less than 30% chance of Italy being in the Euro in 5 years time: that is before the restrictions on state aid for Italy’s banks is factored in deriving from Italy’s membership of the EU and Euro.

Certainly in the aftermath of the Italian decision, I heard a former EU Commissioner state that the decision was nothing to do with a rejection of the EU or Euro and all about a rejection of the changes Renzi was pushing through, together with a rejection of Renzi’s record, and this European Commission view was then picked up by the US papers and some of their centrist Italian commenters.  All is well, we are told in Euroland.

However, the Italians on an extremely high turn out, voted by 60 percent to reject the proposals, almost 10 percent more than voted for Brexit.  Notwithstanding that in Brexit too, voters were also rejecting domestic political leadership as well as European and with both the 5 star movement and Northern League in Italy pushing for leaving the Euro and going back to an earlier and less centrist relationship within Europe, the Italians have not finished yet.

It is worth remembering that it was a small political party with only one MP in the UK [UKIP] which forced the government to open the way for a referendum and Brexit.  The groundswell in Italy is far stronger than what we had in the UK within mainstream politics, and the parties far to the right of anything we have in parliament.

The Italians have not finished yet.  So we will have to see what happens.  Will they follow us with a move to Itaxit or Euroxit, or will they follow the Austrian rejection of the right in their mainly symbolic election of a President?



By Kevin Maney+ on December 9, 2016 at 1:22 am [comment link]
From the entry: Methodist Theologian Thomas Oden 1931-2016, RIP, Champion of Christian Orthodoxy

Breaks my heart. Oden was one of my heroes who helped keep me from falling into the abyss. Rest eternal grant unto him, O Lord, and let light perpetual shine on him. My his soul, with the rest of the faithful departed, rest in peace and rise (with his body) in glory.



By Kendall Harmon on December 7, 2016 at 6:45 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Remembering Pearl Harbor 75 years later today

Thanks #1 i have amended it accordingly



By Jeff Walton on December 7, 2016 at 5:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Nepal: A Historic and Memorable Episcopal Visit by Bp Rennis Ponniah and Abp Foley Beach

An encouraging account of the visit. I’m amazed by what has transpired in Nepal.



By Katherine on December 7, 2016 at 2:37 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Remembering Pearl Harbor 75 years later today

This link contains an auto-play audio.



By Pb on December 7, 2016 at 12:29 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Globe and Mail) David Haskell--How to grow a church: some church leaders might not like the answer

A member of my neighborhood parish visited a growing church and asked his rector if they could try some things he observed. He was told that the mainline church is dying and there was nothing that could be done about it. I do not go there.



By MichaelA on December 7, 2016 at 5:10 am [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

Thank you Canon Harmon - astute observations.



By tired on December 6, 2016 at 1:37 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Globe and Mail) David Haskell--How to grow a church: some church leaders might not like the answer

20 Woe to those who call evil good
  and good evil,
who put darkness for light
  and light for darkness,
who put bitter for sweet
  and sweet for bitter!
21 Woe to those who are wise in their own eyes,
  and shrewd in their own sight!

Isa 5



By David Keller on December 6, 2016 at 9:55 am [comment link]
From the entry: Doctors of the World Christmas cards combine nativity scenes with images from war zones

And the point is…?



By Kendall Harmon on December 5, 2016 at 7:41 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

It is important to note that Italy is oversimplified if it is thought to be simply an anti-EU vote.  There were many pro Eu people who voted no and lobbied no, perhaps most notably Mario Monti.  SOME of the vote was very much against the quite substantial change to the sytem that mr Renzi requested. To an extent, then, this was an anti Renzi and anti aggressive fundamental systemic change vote, so the parallels to Brexit are not exact.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 5, 2016 at 5:42 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

Well, I expect we will all end up just trading with Taiwan, Katherine. grin



By Katherine on December 5, 2016 at 4:58 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

It’s going to be an interesting ride, Pageantmaster.  I note that our president-elect does not want to put the UK “at the back of the queue,” as Mr. Obama put it.



By MichaelA on December 5, 2016 at 6:19 am [comment link]
From the entry: Whos on Which Side of the Lunch Counter? Civil Rights, Religious Accommodation+Diversity Challenges

In the end, the only thing that will change this, in all western countries, is the establishment of many soundly based congregations throughout the country.



By MichaelA on December 5, 2016 at 6:17 am [comment link]
From the entry: [Canon Phil Ashey] Growth Occurs When Vision and Values Match

“I guess I thought the revolution against TEC was more widespread, larger.”

In fact its smaller than that, because many in ACNA were never part of TEC in the first place. 

But it is what it is.  ACNA on its web-site claims that it unites “112,000 Anglicans in nearly 1,000 congregations across the United States, Canada, and Mexico”.  In one sense, that is a lot.  But if you think about the way TEC and ACoC churches are disappearing, that means whole swathes of North America lack any Anglican witness.

Hence the call for planting viable churches.  ACNA will only survive if it conquers.  That means not conquering TEC, but rather nurturing many new faithful congregations across the continent.



By MichaelA on December 5, 2016 at 5:51 am [comment link]
From the entry: Gafcon UK--Secretary-General’s letter shows why GAFCON UK is needed

“The question to ask, then, is not “what will happen if the Church of England crosses the line and accepts same sex relationships”. It has already crossed that line in practice if not in the increasingly irrelevant official doctrine.”

It was pretty obvious that Gafcon UK had reached this conclusion two months ago, when its mission arm, the Anglican Mission in England (AMIE) announced its intention to plant 25 new independent Anglican churches in England by 2025, and 250 by 2050.

There is little that CofE can do or say about this.  The real question is, will they succeed in planting so many new churches?



By MichaelA on December 5, 2016 at 5:39 am [comment link]
From the entry: CROSSING THE RUBICON: Lambeth Resolution I.10, the Church of England, and the Anglican Communion

“Ironically,  as a group (though not as individuals) [Gafcon] lacks the most essential attribute of holy love for the marginal…”

Since this accusation was made without a shred of reasoning or fact to support it, nothing more need be said.



By Pageantmaster ن on December 5, 2016 at 12:11 am [comment link]
From the entry: Renzi goes down to Defeat in Italian Referendum

Every so often, it appears that there is a year or several years of revolutions.  1848 is usually called the year of revolutions, but around 1919 there was the fall of the German, Austrian, Russian and Chinese Empires, and in 1989 there was the extraordinary and unforeseen fall of the communist dictatorships of Eastern Europe and Russia.

The aftermath of war or the hardship of famine, austerity or the poverty of globalisation seems to precipitate these revolutions.  Now in 2016-17 almost a hundred years after the Russian Revolution, we have seen Brexit, the US election, and now Italy with liberal but increasingly dictatorial governments being rejected, and we haven’t even heard from France yet where revolting is a historical national pastime; though along with Germany and the Netherlands we may hear from the French later in the new year.

Like David Cameron’s project fear-mongering, I watched Renzi’s arrogance as he informed us that Britain would pay a high price for Brexit and he and the European Union were going to ensure that we were given no quarter.  Now like Cameron he has been swept away by the deplorables at his palace gates.

Hubris and nemesis.

Meanwhile in its glass and marble EU palaces, the grey suited frightful old socialist politicians of France and Belgium, the last remaining relics from the 60’s who believe in world government, continue on in blithe but fearful paralysis believing that the solution is more of what has failed already, more Europe and a Eurozone which condemns Southern Europe to poverty and uncompetiveness in a system tied to and only benefiting the German economy.

Ah well.  Perhaps Britain should not be in too much of a hurry to invoke Article 50 but sit back and watch what happens in what may turn out to be another year of revolutions. 

Que sera sera.  Viva la revolucion!



By Fr. Dale on December 4, 2016 at 1:52 pm [comment link]
From the entry: CROSSING THE RUBICON: Lambeth Resolution I.10, the Church of England, and the Anglican Communion

“They have a Wesley-Whitfield size track record of redemptive ministry to the lost and sexually broken…” Do you have supporting evidence of this?



By Pb on December 4, 2016 at 9:48 am [comment link]
From the entry: [Canon Phil Ashey] Growth Occurs When Vision and Values Match

DSC has not yet joined ACNA. There are a number of options for those who leave TEC.



By Marie Blocher on December 3, 2016 at 11:06 am [comment link]
From the entry: [Canon Phil Ashey] Growth Occurs When Vision and Values Match

” I am reminded by our actual numbers that we can fit every ACNA Anglican that worships on Sunday into a college football stadium.”
Struck me right in my chest, knocking the wind right out of me. I had pictured us as much larger than that, what with the whole dioceses of Quincy, Fort Worth, SC, Christ Church and hundreds of smaller churches that have left TEC. I guess I thought the revolution against TEC was more widespread, larger. I know some clergy left because they wanted to be out from under authority of the Bishop, only to find they were assigned another Bishop to have authority over them. But, those that left because of sincere conviction they could no longer be part of the blasphemous, destructive behavior of TEC seem to have grown, ie.  vision = values.



By tired on December 2, 2016 at 5:15 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Whos on Which Side of the Lunch Counter? Civil Rights, Religious Accommodation+Diversity Challenges

#2 I concur generally, and most frequently use the second of your list - as vague as it might be.



By sophy0075 on December 2, 2016 at 3:35 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Whos on Which Side of the Lunch Counter? Civil Rights, Religious Accommodation+Diversity Challenges

I respectfully submit that these social engineers intent upon up-ending morality should not be given the positive-sounding appellation “progressive,” but rather referred to as immoral, leftist, or socialist.



By tired on December 2, 2016 at 3:06 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Whos on Which Side of the Lunch Counter? Civil Rights, Religious Accommodation+Diversity Challenges

“...the Christian florist and photographer and marriage counselor are still free to retain their private religious convictions about marriage. They simply cannot act on those convictions while carrying on the business…”

I have heard some “progressives” argue this. However, I do not think it is an accurate/honest description.  One need only observe the attacks on Brendan Eich of Mozilla, Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty, or more currently, the campaign against the Gaines of “Fixer Upper.”  In each of these examples, it was never a case of a private belief intruding into public business. 

To coin an overused term, the progressive movement is nothing less than eliminationism.



By Pb on December 2, 2016 at 10:16 am [comment link]
From the entry: (JE) Todd Ousley--The Episcopal Bishop of Eastern Michigan Warns Against Culture of Fear

One of the hallmarks of the liberal/progressive movement is the total lack of accountability. Failure is always due to factors beyond one’s control. Ignorance and fear (phobia) cause people to flee their church. If you disagree with a liberal, there is something wrong with you. This is classic stuff.



By Kendall Harmon on December 1, 2016 at 8:15 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (New Statesman) Rowan Williams--Mass democracy has failed – it's time to seek a humane alternative

From AB

Rowan Williams’ “thoughts” are an excellent example of something C.S. Lewis warned against:

“But, of course, when they ask for a lead from the Church most people mean they want the clergy to put
out a political programme. That is silly. The clergy are those particular people within the whole
Church who have been specially trained and set aside to look after what concerns us as creatures who
are going to live forever: and we are asking them to do a quite different job for which they have not
been trained.”  - Mere Christianity



By Terry Tee on November 30, 2016 at 12:12 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Church Times) Fresh Expressions shakes off critics

Sounds like an explosion of creativity, which is impressive. Even more impressive is the clear desire to draw others into the life offered us by Christ. So credit where credit is due. And yet. As I have commented before in connection with Fresh Expressions: where are the figures to show growth in numbers? Does Fresh Expressions draw from the already existing pool of Anglican Christians, or does it draw in the unchurched? The stats continue to show average weekly attendance and usual Sunday attendance as falling. I also have the impression that sometimes already existing activities are born again with the new title of Fresh Expressions tacked on to them.



By Tory on November 29, 2016 at 11:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: CROSSING THE RUBICON: Lambeth Resolution I.10, the Church of England, and the Anglican Communion

I agree with Steve Noll, Special Advisor to GAFCON, on most of his contextual analysis of Lambeth 1.10 and more importantly, I absolutely agree that there is no scriptural or theological warrant for sanctioning sexual relations outside of marriage, which is the life long Union of husband and wife. However, I disagree with the parallel he constructs between the CofE and TEC.  They are culturally and historically very different churches in the Communion and their approach to their same-sex attracted members is also very different.  The deliberative and open way they have discussed the theological and pastoral issues surrounding same sex relations is miles apart from what happened in TEC.
My deeper disagreement is that somehow GAFCON is the guardian of AC orthodoxy in Faith and morals, especially on same sex matters. It cannot guard that which is does not actually posses within itself.  As I have discussed with Steve (and other GAFCON leaders) in other contexts, GAFCON’s leadership is too spiritually and morally compromised in this area to be an effective bulwark against the sexual nihilism sweeping over the West.  Ironically,  as a group (though not as individuals) it lacks the most essential attribute of holy love for the marginal that Archbishop Welby and his colleagues at HTB actually possess and demonstrate abundantly: They have a Wesley-Whitfield size track record of redemptive ministry to the lost and sexually broken, symptomatic of the multiple alienations currently crippling our culture in the Western hemisphere.  They posses a proven missional strategy, memorably encapsulated in Pope Francis’ concept of “accompaniment” demonstrated, in part, in the beautiful domestic church movement known as “Mistero Grande.”  This is one reason, among many, that the RCC has joined Archbishop Welby and HTB in mission in the re-evangelization of the West.  This cannot be said for GAFCON.

There is much more of relevance to this crisis than Mr. Nye’s letter, and its context in our current struggle, than my friend Steve Noll’s essay presents. Archbishop Welby and the CofE may make mistakes, even grievous ones, but they are not the ones in danger of barreling over the Niagara.



By jpt175 on November 27, 2016 at 5:35 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Perspective from the Pages of History (I)

I showed this to my five year old…...Can we get one of those Daddy?



By Terry Tee on November 25, 2016 at 5:30 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Perspective from the Pages of History (I)

My first thought was (tongue in cheek) why did no one contact the Human Society (for UK readers: = RSPCA).  But then I wondered, could those birds really pull that loaded wagon? I think not and that it is posed for effect. Farming readers might want to advise me on whether this is feasible or not.

BTW: visiting Western Michigan I drove past a large turkey farm several times. The stench was unbelievable. I thought that for the family living in the farm house they earned every penny they made by putting up with that appalling smell.



By Already Gone on November 21, 2016 at 6:23 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (RI) Rob Sturdy--The Social Reformation

The claim that the Catholic Church did not care about the poor or social justice at the time of the Reformation is not shared by all Protestants.  “The monasteries were thus the beginning of many of the essential elements of capitalism, particularly the reinvestment of profits to increase production, motivated by a Biblical understanding of work and the image of God.  The unintended effect of all this was to raise the amount of goods available to people and therefore raise the standard of living in Europe across the board through the central Middle Ages. This also produced important social changes, including most notably the conversion of the vast majority of European serfs to free peasants….  In the sixteenth century, cities began to see care for their own poor as a civic responsibility. The Reformation heightened this trend, since without the Catholic organizations, someone had to pick up the slack in caring for the poor…. For example, when the city of Geneva converted to Protestantism in 1535, it replaced all of the Catholic relief organizations with a single “General Hospital.”  The Colson Center at http://www.colsoncenter.org/the-center/columns/call-response/16881-the-church-and-the-poor-historical-perspectives.  Interestingly, indulgences were sold (a practice the Catholic Church abolished at the Council of Trent) on an an ability to pay basis with the poor paying much less.  “The going rate for an indulgence depended on one’s station, and ranged from 25 gold florins for Kings and queens and archbishops down to three florins for merchants and just one quarter florin for the poorest of believers.”  See http://www.law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/luther/lutherindulgences.html



By Pageantmaster ن on November 21, 2016 at 2:48 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Music for his Feast Day--Sing Joyfully, by William Byrd (1540-1623)

Now, where did I put my timbrel?



By Pageantmaster ن on November 21, 2016 at 12:27 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Lateline) Dying in the comfort in your own home

Not enough people get the chance to have this care at home, but it can be helpful if they can.  It is a difficult thing to provide, but very rewarding.  God bless them.



By Timothy Fountain on November 21, 2016 at 12:22 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Choose one chair--Wisdom from the father of Luciano Pavarotti (1935-2007)

Thank you for this.  It moved me to reflection and prayer.



By Pageantmaster ن on November 21, 2016 at 12:19 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A Prayer to begin the day from Uppingham School

A wholesome prayer to start the day.  Now for a cold shower after my run.



By Pageantmaster ن on November 21, 2016 at 11:41 am [comment link]
From the entry: Music For his Feast Day--Thomas Tallis: Spem In Alium

It gives perhaps an inkling of how wonderful and beautiful God is.



By Pageantmaster ن on November 21, 2016 at 11:34 am [comment link]
From the entry: Music For his Feast Day--Thomas Tallis: Spem In Alium

Put the headphones on, turn up the quality and volume, close your eyes and swim in it.

One of life’s pleasures.  Thank you.



By dwstroudmd+ on November 19, 2016 at 10:31 am [comment link]
From the entry: The Washington Post has a terrifying interview with a Facebook fake-news writer

I remember false stories promulgated by the ABC about events in Africa over the impress of authority that were latter totally discredited.  So, hairy lefties should make sure of their facts as well.  But the general observation that “people are dumber” is an egalitarian statement and applies without prejudice to all, including liberals and progressives et alia, not just the one WaPo would like.



By Katherine on November 18, 2016 at 6:35 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Washington Post has a terrifying interview with a Facebook fake-news writer

With all due respect to the “news” scams this writer cites, the tendency to believe viral false stories is by no means confined to the right.  By no means.  Some degree of self-inspection would benefit the left.



By Br. Michael on November 18, 2016 at 10:13 am [comment link]
From the entry: (Time) Denver Becomes First City to Allow Marijuana Use in Bars and Restaurants

My question too.



By pastorchuckie on November 17, 2016 at 3:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (Time) Denver Becomes First City to Allow Marijuana Use in Bars and Restaurants

How many of these bars and restaurants have banned tobacco smoking?



By Jim the Puritan on November 16, 2016 at 9:01 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (NYT) Social Media’s Globe-Shaking Power

Hence, the present move by Google, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to ban “fake news” from their services.  “Fake news” being anything that challenges the liberal establishment’s bullet points.



By Undergroundpewster on November 16, 2016 at 5:18 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (JE) Jeff Walton--Shuttering Episcopal Divinity School Burning Cash

#2 Jeff Walton, She is bound to surface once Trump announces his nominee for Supreme Court Justice.



By Jeff Walton on November 16, 2016 at 5:08 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (JE) Jeff Walton--Shuttering Episcopal Divinity School Burning Cash

I’m straining to find out what Ragsdale has been up to since departing EDS. Her spouse—Canon Mally Lloyd—was elected to the Episcopal Church Executive Council, but I can’t find anything current for Ragsdale herself. Last I heard, Ragsdale was serving as interim senior fellow in Religious Literacy & Interfaith Leadership at the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, but that was set to conclude in May of 2016.



By Undergroundpewster on November 15, 2016 at 4:16 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (JE) Jeff Walton--Shuttering Episcopal Divinity School Burning Cash

A tale of from Ragsdale to rags.



By Kendall Harmon on November 14, 2016 at 9:36 am [comment link]
From the entry: Jeffrey Miller's Sunday Sermon at St Philips Charleston "What Does The Future Hold" (Luke 21:5-19)

This includes a courageous, and I think correctly targeted, section on the recent Presidential campaign.



By Vatican Watcher on November 13, 2016 at 11:20 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Veterans Day Remarks--Try to Guess the Speaker and the Date

Kennedy and his speechwriters were the last true rhetoricians to occupy the White House.  Maybe someone and his team will come again.



By Pb on November 11, 2016 at 11:47 am [comment link]
From the entry: (Wash Po) Charles Camosy--Trump won because college-educated Americans are out of touch

I read some time ago that liberals tend to believe that people who disagree with them have character flaws. Here they are ignorant. But Trump supporters/voters are also homophobic, Islamophobic, sexists, and racists. So much for ideas.



By Marie Blocher on November 11, 2016 at 11:38 am [comment link]
From the entry: Salena Zito--Trump’s voters were ‘hidden’ in plain sight

They weren’t so much hidden as IGNORED.


Page 1 of 4235 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »

Return to blog homepage

Return to Mobile view (headlines)