RECENT COMMENTS

By MichaelA on April 23, 2014 at 12:49 am [comment link]
From the entry: Damien Thompson--Same-Sex Marriage: the silence of the Archbishop of Canterbury

Damien Thompson presciently writes:

“That Archbishop Welby does not say this implies that, like vast numbers of Anglicans, he regards homosexual marriage as a plausible “development of doctrine”.”

That seems likely.  If so, it would explain why he was selected as ABC by the CofE establishment.  And Damien’s next comment is right on the money:

“Sooner or later Justin Welby will have to tell us exactly where he stands on gay marriage, and then face the consequences.”

True - like his fellow bishops, ++Welby has failed to stand up to the self-proclaimed “Christian Prime Minister” David Cameron behind closed doors (by pointing out the impossible situation the PM puts them in with these law changes), so now he is indeed going to be forced to state his position.  But whether there are any “consequences” worth speaking of will depend upon Anglican Christians in England.

I suggest however that Damien misses the mark on the issue of the Communion:

“For decades, every Archbishop of Canterbury has tried to combine primacy of England’s established Church with leadership of an Anglican Communion that is not really a communion at all, since it is held together by history and sentiment rather than by doctrine and teaching authority”

If that was all there was to it, then ++Welby wouldn’t have a problem.  He could do whatever he liked (more accurately, whatever the CofE establishment liked) without any complaint. 

Rather, his problem arises from the fact that there are many, many people in the Anglican Communion who DO think it is held together by doctrine and teaching authority.  Or perhaps it would be better to say that they think it is only worth keeping INSOFAR AS it is held together by doctrine and teaching authority.  ++Welby is proving himself no more suited to deal with that majority of the Anglican Communion than was his predecessor.



By montanan on April 23, 2014 at 12:46 am [comment link]
From the entry: We Realize we need to Play Catch up thanks to the end of Holy Week Break

What about those parishes that are not worthy of sharing…?  wink



By MichaelA on April 23, 2014 at 12:37 am [comment link]
From the entry: Damien Thompson--Same-Sex Marriage: the silence of the Archbishop of Canterbury

“He could smell dead bodies in the cathedral – surely a unique experience for an Archbishop of Canterbury.”

Well, unique in the last few hundred years…



By MichaelA on April 23, 2014 at 12:20 am [comment link]
From the entry: Jim Trainor on Easter--I believe the story and that is why I know that I will see my mother again

Thank you for this, God bless you.



By MichaelA on April 23, 2014 at 12:14 am [comment link]
From the entry: Easter Song, 2nd Chapter of Acts

Thanks Karen, some great music there.



By Jeff Walton on April 22, 2014 at 5:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (BBC) South Sudan conflict: Bentiu 'ethnic slaughter' condemned

This is troubling. Thank you for sharing it, however—we need to know this information, and the people of South Sudan covet our prayers.



By New Reformation Advocate on April 22, 2014 at 4:03 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Damien Thompson--Same-Sex Marriage: the silence of the Archbishop of Canterbury

Yes, Katherine.  Another disappointing case of a missed opportunity.  By not speaking more clearly and forcefully, ++Welby leaves himself open to being interpreted as Damien Thompson does in this acidic editorial.  It can appear as if the archbishop is just opposed to the CoE going “too far” or especially “too fast.”  When it reality it should not, and must not go there at all.  Ever.

Alas, while ++Welby’s is (or appears to be) personally opposed to gay marriage, whereas Rowan Williams privately supported it, both men are futilely seeking to preserve a superficial institutional unity that masks an irreconcilable internal division.  That tiresome charade is looking ever more silly.  And Damian rightly calls him on it.  In the end, the truth will out.  “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”  And it won’t, no matter what the ABoC does or doesn’t do.

David Handy+



By New Reformation Advocate on April 22, 2014 at 3:41 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The recent NY Times Article on ACNA priest Tory Baucum and TEC Bishop Shannon Johnston

I went to Truro during Holy Week for a clergy gathering of my ACNA diocese (Mid-Atlantic, under +John Guernsey).  The parish is actively seeking to find a new home, but it’s really difficult when there is no virgin land in Fairfax County and moving anywhere is super-expensive.  But Truro will eventually find a new home.  The agreement just buys them a little more time.

Thanks, Jeff, for the link.  Yes, there are lots of aspects to this controversial relationship that are conveniently left out of this somewhat misleading article.  I know that Sarah Hey and a lot of other bloggers won’t agree with me, but I will simply testify, again, that Tory Baucom has won my trust.  And he’s been unfairly criticized by some conservative Anglican bloggers.

Daviod Handy+



By New Reformation Advocate on April 22, 2014 at 3:15 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (BBC) South Sudan conflict: Bentiu 'ethnic slaughter' condemned

Heartbreaking news.  Such horrific atrocities in a land that has already suffered so much.  But that’s part of the grim dynamic: violence breeds violence.  As the old sardonic adage goes:  “An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth, and the whole world ends up eyeless and toothless.”

When the genocide took place 20 years ago in Rwanda, many of the world’s leaders swore, “Never again.”  But just look at the eastern Congo.  Just look at the tragedy unfolding in South Sudan.  It may actually be easier to rid the world of polio or smallpox than of genocide.  In the end, only the inifinite, unconditional, transforming love of Jesus Christ can heal the human heart enough that we can love our enemies, as He did.

Lord, have mercy.

David Handy+



By Jackie Keenan on April 22, 2014 at 1:22 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The recent NY Times Article on ACNA priest Tory Baucum and TEC Bishop Shannon Johnston

I am ten minutes from Truro, although I attend Christ the Redeemer, which was originally a mission of Truro.  I noticed that they redid the lease to last until after the next election of a Presiding Bishop.  +Johnston can’t settle as long as Schori is in charge, but it would be beneficial for Truro to be able to stay where it is, and +Johnston has no congregation for the building.  He will want to sell it, and they will want to buy it.



By Chris on April 22, 2014 at 11:53 am [comment link]
From the entry: The recent NY Times Article on ACNA priest Tory Baucum and TEC Bishop Shannon Johnston

I think the relationship between these two will continue as long as the agreement to use the property does (and what does it say about Dio Va’s finances that they don’t want it for their own purposes?).  I think in the long term it would be better for them to find a new place to worship (or +Johnston agrees to sell it) then you have more clarity.



By Jeff Walton on April 22, 2014 at 10:55 am [comment link]
From the entry: The recent NY Times Article on ACNA priest Tory Baucum and TEC Bishop Shannon Johnston

I had several questions after reading this piece. Over at Get Religion, Terry Mattingly asks many of them: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/getreligion/2014/04/a-nice-but-at-times-confusing-story-on-virginia-anglican-wars/



By William Witt on April 22, 2014 at 9:07 am [comment link]
From the entry: (RNS) Can you question the Resurrection and still be a Christian?

I heard two sermons preached in Episcopal churches that (in both cases) were the last sermons I ever heard preached in those churches because I did not return.

On Palm Sunday, I heard a priest begin his sermon with the words: “The single idea that has caused more suffering and evil than any other idea in the history of humanity is the idea that Jesus died for our sins.” There followed a twenty minute diatribe in which everything from the Inquisition to the Nazi holocaust to the genocide in Bosnia were said to be the consequence of people believing that Jesus had died for their sins. The congregation then rose and read the words from the Nicene Creed.

The second was preached on Easter Sunday and the topic of the sermon was that the good news of Easter is that we do not have to believe that Jesus rose bodily from the grave. We were assured that lots of NT scholars were not making that clear. So if you have trouble believing in that resurrection stuff, don’t feel bad, the priest continued. This church is the place for you.



By Capt. Father Warren on April 22, 2014 at 8:34 am [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

#4, my strategy exactly this time of year [repeated at Christmas of course]



By William Witt on April 22, 2014 at 8:00 am [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

The PB makes no distinction between the body of Christ as the actually resurrected humanity of the actually dead Jesus, and the body of Christ as the church—the community of those who are in fellowship with the risen Christ.

KJS asserts that the risen Christ is NOT identical to the Jesus who died: “Clearly the risen body is not identical to the Jesus who was crucified.” Clearly, if you read the texts, the gospel writers are asserting that the risen body IS indeed identical to the Jesus who was crucified: “See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me, and see. For a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.” (Luke 24:39)

This sermon is Bultmann’s “Christ is risen into the kerygma.” It is difficult to read this as saying more than “Jesus is dead, but we’re not doing so badly ourselves. Thanks for asking.”



By APB on April 22, 2014 at 7:57 am [comment link]
From the entry: The recent NY Times Article on ACNA priest Tory Baucum and TEC Bishop Shannon Johnston

In Washington, they would say that Bacun+ is “growing” in office.



By Katherine on April 22, 2014 at 6:59 am [comment link]
From the entry: Damien Thompson--Same-Sex Marriage: the silence of the Archbishop of Canterbury

By not commenting or taking action the Archbishop is making his choice.



By Scatcatpdx on April 22, 2014 at 12:02 am [comment link]
From the entry: (RNS) Can you question the Resurrection and still be a Christian?

1 Cor 15”: 1-19
15 Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, 2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain.

3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, 4 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, 5 and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. 6 Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. 7 Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. 8 Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. 9 For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. 10 But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me. 11 Whether then it was I or they, so we preach and so you believed.

The Resurrection of the Dead

12 Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. 19 If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.
There is you anwer



By Milton Finch on April 21, 2014 at 11:36 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

“The Body of Christ is rising today”  (if)

A good recipe for liberal Christianity!  Bake that Bread!



By Karen B. on April 21, 2014 at 9:19 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Easter Song, 2nd Chapter of Acts

By the way, the original recording of Easter Song by 2nd Chapter of Acts appeared on their very first album “With Footnotes”, in 1974, which happened to be the very first Christian album I ever purchased (in 1975 - I was 12, and a new Christian).  Matthew Ward was only about 15 when that first album was released.  His vocals standout more on this live version.  I love his voice.  So distinctive!

The back of the album contains either part or all of the text of Acts Chapter 2.  The song titles were the “footnotes” annotating certain verses.

front cover:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/de/With-Footnotes-cover.JPG

back cover:
http://www.rootdownrecords.jp/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/2nd-chapter-of-acts-with-footnotes02.jpg



By Karen B. on April 21, 2014 at 9:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Easter Song, 2nd Chapter of Acts

For more classic CCM Easter music, you’ll want to visit Lent & Beyond this week.  I’m posting a bunch of CCM songs for Easter from the 1970s and 1980s.  The Imperials, Benny Hester, Steve Green, Glad, DeGarmo & Key, John Michael & Terry Talbot, Larnelle Harris & Sandi Patty…. and so so much more!

Here’s the link for the CCM Classics series:
http://anglicanprayer.wordpress.com/category/church-seasons/easter/easter-music-easter/ccm-classics-for-easter/

We’ll also be posting traditional hymns and classical music as well.  All our Easter music posts can be found here:
http://anglicanprayer.wordpress.com/category/church-seasons/easter/easter-music-easter/

He is Risen, Hallelujah!



By Luke on April 21, 2014 at 8:56 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

Ad O, I’m with you, skipping the message.



By Ad Orientem on April 21, 2014 at 8:49 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

I thought I’d take a look at the comments to see if I really wanted to read the message. Glad I did. Moving on…



By Archer_of_the_Forest on April 21, 2014 at 8:25 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

Broiled fish? What, were the disciples using a Foreman grill?



By Archer_of_the_Forest on April 21, 2014 at 8:24 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

Passing through walls? Teleportation? What?



By Archer_of_the_Forest on April 21, 2014 at 8:23 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop's Easter Message 2014

Lettuce fields? What?



By Christopher Johnson on April 21, 2014 at 8:20 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (RNS) Can you question the Resurrection and still be a Christian?

I third the motion.  Gotta go with no here, Kendall.



By Publius on April 21, 2014 at 5:01 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (RNS) Can you question the Resurrection and still be a Christian?

Short answer: No.



By Ad Orientem on April 21, 2014 at 3:57 pm [comment link]
From the entry: (RNS) Can you question the Resurrection and still be a Christian?

No.



By Capt. Father Warren on April 21, 2014 at 1:25 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Tom Wright—The Church must stop trivialising Easter

Good solid article, especially the part about first century Jews backing Messiah’s who got killed by the authorities “which means you backed the wrong guy”.  Jesus rose from the dead and so the disciples realized they had not backed the wrong guy.

But Wright fails to mention that Jesus told His followers this was exactly what was to happen, Mk. 8:31-33 being an excellent example after Peter declared Him to be the Messiah.



By sophy0075 on April 21, 2014 at 12:46 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Dean of Durham's 2014 Easter Sermon--The Truth by Which we Live and Die – and Live.

Easter Joy.

Thank you for posting the link to this.



By sophy0075 on April 21, 2014 at 11:55 am [comment link]
From the entry: Peter Moore--A Review of the feature film: “God is (not) Dead”

My husband loved it (I was busy that night and haven’t seen it). Unfortunately, even schools with formerly-Christian associations now have atheist, or at least agnostic professors, in biology, philosophy, and religion classes. Our daughter will be taking a course in New Testament theology next year at Furman; I just pray her professor is not one of those who will persuasively sway her away from her faith, which has already been under assault by most of her fellow students.



By Milton on April 21, 2014 at 10:55 am [comment link]
From the entry: Good Friday--A Five Year Old Gives Just a Glimpse of What the Cross Really Means

Thank you so much for posting this.  Not having read Chicken Soup For the Soul or checking the blog since Thursday, I am reading this for the first time and still cannot quite catch my breath or see clearly for the tears!  For the heart and courage of a child…



By Scatcatpdx on April 20, 2014 at 12:02 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Easter 2014 Blog Open Thread (I): Where and with Whom are you Spending this Easter?

I will go to church St Mathews Anglian then relax at home by myself. Had an outing with friends yesterday. I have a prime rib dinner and watch light movie.



By Already Gone on April 20, 2014 at 10:04 am [comment link]
From the entry: Easter 2014 Blog Open Thread (I): Where and with Whom are you Spending this Easter?

My wife and I are attending the 1030 Mass at Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Annandale, VA, where I will be serving as a Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion for the first time.  She is serving in the choir again, after singing for three hours last night at the Great Easter Vigil.



By Rosalind on April 20, 2014 at 8:03 am [comment link]
From the entry: Easter 2014 Blog Open Thread (I): Where and with Whom are you Spending this Easter?

I am in Wheaton Illinois for the baptism of my first grandchild at Easter Vigil last night. She was baptized at Church of the Resurrection, and they really celebrate their feast day!



By Karen B. on April 19, 2014 at 5:07 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Kendall Harmon on Holy Saturday 2014--This day Really Does Matter

Kendall, thanks for the wealth of resources you’ve posted today to help us stop and pause and reflect.

In case it’s of interest, it seemed like I should create a compilation listing of all you’ve posted for Holy Saturday to share with all our readers at Lent & Beyond.  It’s here:

http://anglicanprayer.wordpress.com/2014/04/19/kendall-harmons-wealth-of-holy-saturday-entries/



By Kendall Harmon on April 19, 2014 at 3:52 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A Kendall Harmon Sermon for Good Friday-- The Cross gives life over death (John 10:7-18)

The subject is Good Friday



By IchabodKunkleberry on April 19, 2014 at 2:02 am [comment link]
From the entry: All generations shall lament and bewail themselves more than him

1546, actually.



By Dan Crawford on April 18, 2014 at 10:13 pm [comment link]
From the entry: Failure, Rejection, and Ineffectualness

Endo deserves to be more widely read and appreciated by western Christians, “Silence” and Endo’s “Life of Christ” especially.



By jhp on April 18, 2014 at 8:33 pm [comment link]
From the entry: J.S. Bach: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" (Choir of King's College, Cambridge)

Thank you for posting this ... just lovely!
And thanks for the comments as well.
A perfect meditation for this Good Friday.

Anyone looking to visit the great sites associated with Bach’s life and music (and eager to draw on John Eliot Gardner’s lifetime of musical scholarship!) might want to see the wonderful BBC documentary, Bach: A Passionate Life.  It’s available on YouTube, it’s in HiDef (so glorious on the Big Screen if your TV does YouTube) and it’s a wonderful introduction to the kind of insight JHG offers in his new book on Bach.

Gardner goes to the great German locales, we hear some selections (too few alas) and the interviews are really really insightful.  I highly recommend it!



By Karen B. on April 18, 2014 at 6:36 pm [comment link]
From the entry: For I the Lord have slain

P.S. persistance pays off.  It was *REALLY* bothering me to have posted a totally anonymous download at Lent & Beyond.  I very much wanted to credit the artist…  I kept searching a bit more, and finally found out the singer of the nice version of this hymn I posted at L&B.  The artist is a singer-songwriter from Indiana named Phil Kirk. 

You can find the track here:
https://soundcloud.com/phil-kirk/in-evil-long-i-took-delight

And more hymns and worship songs from him here. 
https://soundcloud.com/phil-kirk



By Karen B. on April 18, 2014 at 5:11 pm [comment link]
From the entry: A Kendall Harmon Sermon for Good Friday-- The Cross gives life over death (John 10:7-18)

Kendall, it appears the link is for your Palm Sunday sermon?



By Karen B. on April 18, 2014 at 3:38 pm [comment link]
From the entry: For I the Lord have slain

Hi Kendall, thanks for posting this.  It’s such a wonderful testimony of the transformation in John Newton’s life.  I also posted this hymn by John Newton at L&B today, including a link to a modern adaptation of the bymn by Bob Kauflin of Sovereign Grace Music, as well as a sung recording of Newton’s hymn that I dug up in the bowels of the internet.  I have no idea who the artist is, but it’s quite a good quality recording and it brings Newton’s words alive.

Here’s the entry:
Good Friday Hymn #4:  In Evil Long I Took Delight

It’s quite striking that there are virtually NO recordings of this hymn online anywhere or for purchase at iTunes, etc.  If any T19 reader knows of a good recording of the hymn, I’d love to know of it.  Please leave a comment on the post at Lent & Beyond linked above.

Praise God that He is able to transform us!

A blessed Triduum and Easter to you, Kendall!



By New Reformation Advocate on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 pm [comment link]
From the entry: The Sacrifice

Very apt selection.  Thanks, Kendall.

The poem, with its refrain taken from a familiar text from Lamentations 1, is by George Herbert, the saintly English priest and poet, and one of the most beloved “Caroline divines” (he died in 1633).

David Handy+



By CSeitz-ACI on April 18, 2014 at 12:26 pm [comment link]
From the entry: J.S. Bach: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" (Choir of King's College, Cambridge)

Herzliebster Jesu is Choral No. 3 and several more and interspersed precede ‘O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden’, and only then the single ‘Be near me Lord when dying’ (‘Wenn ich einmal soll scheiden’).

To have been in Leipzig when this was performed. The congregation must have left transfixed and transformed. The recent John Eliot Gardiner book on Bach is sheer genius. My wife and I visited Eisenach last summer. Bach’s house is there, as is the house where Luther attended Latin school, and of course the famous Wartburg Castle.



By CSeitz-ACI on April 18, 2014 at 12:17 pm [comment link]
From the entry: J.S. Bach: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" (Choir of King's College, Cambridge)

My error. I just checked the libretto. Two stanzas (‘O sacred head’ and ‘Thy beauty long desired’ in English translation) are at Matthew 27:27-30, the mocking and spitting scene.

‘Be near me Lord when dying’ is the single stanza following Christ’s death.



By CSeitz-ACI on April 18, 2014 at 12:09 pm [comment link]
From the entry: J.S. Bach: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" (Choir of King's College, Cambridge)

These two stanzas are after the death, but the others are scattered throughout the first movements.



By New Reformation Advocate on April 18, 2014 at 9:29 am [comment link]
From the entry: His Damnation our Liberation, His Defeat our Victory

If you don’t have the time or interest to plow all the way through the thirteen volumes of Barth’s massive systematic theology, the justly famous Church Dogmatics, this brief excerpt gets to the heart of Barth’s deep devotion to Christ and illustrates his fundamental orthodoxy.  Underneath all that sophisticated theologizing we see an ardent Christ-centered piety, a child-like faith. 

It may be worth pointing out that we owe a big debt of gratitude to two prominent Anglican scholars for helping to translate Barth’s most important works into English.  It was the great Cambridge NT scholar, Edwyn Hoskyns, who translated Barth’s early masterpiece, his influential commentary on Romans.  And it was Fuller Seminary’s Geoffrey Bromiiey (an English priest) who, along with the leading Scottish Presbyterian theologian T. F. Torrance, rendered the multi-volume systematic theology into English.  Moreover, the fact that both Hoskyns and Bromiley were motivated to do this shows the breadth of Barth’s appeal among orthodox Christians, for Hoskyns was an Anglo-Catholic whereas Bromiley was an evangelical.  But both great Anglican scholars resonated with Barth’s emphatic criticism of the dominant Liberal Protestantism of the early 20th century theology.

David Handy+



By New Reformation Advocate on April 18, 2014 at 9:11 am [comment link]
From the entry: J.S. Bach: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" (Choir of King's College, Cambridge)

Superb performance (back in 1973).  This is the way this tender chorale should be sung, quietly, with deep reverence and hushed wonder at the unfathomable mystery of divine redemption through the cross.  For those who don’t know or remember the musical context, it’s highly significant that within the long St. Matthew Passion, Bach placed this famous piece right after the point where Jesus dies.  That context makes its impact all the more powerful.

Thanks for posting this moving rendition, Kendall.
David Handy+


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